The Briefly for November 24 – 26, 2020 – The “Staten Island is a Problem” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Governor Cuomo’s Covid-19 announcement, Astor Place Hairstylists saved, 2020’s Thanksgiving parade, apartment lust, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 48˚
Clear throughout the day.

RIP David Dinkins, NYC’s first Black mayor. (Robert D. McFadden for NY Times)

What you should know before getting testing for Covid-19. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Here’s what to expect from the Thanksgiving Day parade this year. (Gas Saltonstall for Patch)

5 places to get a vegetarian Thanksgiving meal. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

Tracy Morgan joined the non-profit Food Bank For New York City and Councilman Robert Cornegy in giving away 1,000 turkeys outside the Sumner Houses in Bed-Stuy. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

On Central Park’s Pilgrim Hill stands a statue “to commemorate the landing of the Pilgrim fathers on Plymouth Rock.” On the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ landing, how appropriate that we’re about to all give each other disease while giving thanks. (Ephemeral New York)

Upper Manhattan and Staten Island are now Covid-19 yellow and orange zones. Staten Island is, in the words of Governor Cuomo, “a problem.” (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The state is reopening an emergency COVID-19 field hospital on Staten Island in South Beach to accommodate the uptick in hospitalizations. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The governor is in some hot water after letting it out that he had invited his mother and daughters over for Thanksgiving while telling the rest of us to stay distanced from each other. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

Cuomo isn’t the only elected official making idiotic moves this week. Mayoral hopeful Eric Adams decided that the middle of a pandemic is the perfect time to host an indoor fundraiser with 18 supporters on the Upper West Side. Technically, the NYC Sheriff should be fining Adams $15,000 for organizing and promoting a violation of the state’s rules regarding indoor dining. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

On the menu at City Winery? A mandatory $50 Covid-19 test. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Despite the drop in subway ridership, the number of incidents where someone was reported on the tracks is on pace to top last year’s number. (Jose Martinez for The City)

In response to an uptick in people being shoved onto subway tracks as of late, Mayor de Blasio says the NYPD presence on the subways will be increased. The mayor also noted that he hadn’t spoken to NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea about his plan. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Blind Pig has begun its transformation into the new Coyote Ugly. (EV Grieve)

Bluestockings, which had closed earlier this year, has a new location and “a lot of magic is happening.” (Pooja Salhotra for Bedford + Bowery)

Apartment Lust: A four-floor, $4.85 million, 1899 Clinton Hill townhouse with wide outdoor space, a side-by-side dual shower (!!!), an open outdoor space, and five bedrooms. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

The Times is anticipating that the departure of Polly Trottenberg, the city’s Commissioner of the Department of Transportation, is the first in a long line of people who will be abandoning the mayor’s sinking ship as his term comes to a close. Trottenberg is most closely tied to Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero campaign, which aims to end traffic fatalities by 2024. Traffic fatalities are up this year. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

This is unexpected. Governor Cuomo won an International Emmy award for his daily press briefings. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Video: A drone’s eye view of Harlem and Crown Heights. (Drone Fanatic)

Briget Rein, City Council Candidate for the 39th District in Brooklyn, is calling for a moratorium on Gowanus rezoning, citing the ULURP process cannot proceed fairly during a pandemic that would lock out the voices of many in the neighborhood, even if it was moved online. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me for Asking)

Attention! There is a glut of apples and squash at the city’s farmer’s markets! (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Astor Place Hairstylists was saved by a group of extremely wealthy investors that would keep the barbershop open “for at least another 75 years.” Maybe spread some of that wealth to other businesses that are also being driven out of existence? (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that Lavita McMath Turner will be its first chief diversity officer, five months after a staff letter urged the museum to look at the white supremacy and systemic racism in the institution. (Zachary Small for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio laid out the city’s strategy to get the city’s schools open. Students with disabilities will return first, following by early education programs, then elementary school students, then middle and high school students. This is assuming the city avoids the state’s “orange zone” status, which seems unlikely. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Beginning in 2021, the Democrats in the New York state senate will have a supermajority and the legislature will be able to stand up to and override vetos from Governor Cuomo. This is the first state supermajority since 1846. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

The story behind the closing of Gloria’s in Crown Heights goes back 20 years and might be one of the most bizarre stories of the entire year. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Up in the air! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a New York City property tax assessment drone! (Peter Senzamici for The City)

The best Black Friday + Cyber Week deals from NYC brands and small businesses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A wonderful story of how Ariel Cordova-Rojas saved a swan. How many times will you see a swan on the subway? (Troy Closson for NY Times)

In tribute to Century 21. (Reginald Ferguson for Brooklyn Based)

If you were one of the people who bought the “Virus Shut Out Cards,” congratulations, you’ve been scammed. (Payton Potter for Patch)

Apartment Lust: The photos of this $1.45 million Morningside Heights apartment may not look like much, but it was once the home of President Obama. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Behind the scenes with the decision by the de Blasio administration to close the city’s schools after the city hit a 3% positivity rate. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

With the GSA recognizing Biden as the winner of the presidential election, what’s the status of congestion pricing? Governor Cuomo doesn’t think it’s important enough to discuss with President-elect Biden. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

A look at how the city’s TV shows and movies resumed production. (Sharon Otterman for NY Times)

If you’ve been obsessing over Queen’s Gambit, maybe it’s time to explore NYC’s chess scene. (Victoria Choe for Untapped New York)

The best new delivery options in Manhattan. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of the ginkgo foliage at Broadway and 143rd!

The Briefly for December 3, 2018 – The “Manhattan Apartments Are So Small…” Edition

Inside the Carnegie Deli, the real reason Amazon picked NYC, the city’s “FULL SNOW RESPONSE” is ready for the next storm, the fight over the “World’s largest” menorah and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Manhattan has the second smallest apartments in the country. At 733 square feet, they’re 22 feet larger than the ones in Seattle. The national average is 904. (The Real Deal)

Have you seen Rat Rock in Morningside Heights? Despite The New York Times calling it “one of the city’s most amazing natural wonders,” it’s not much of a sight to see. (Atlas Obscura)

In a desperate attempt to not be embarrassed by a few inches of snow, the city created something called a FULL SNOW RESPONSE for when more than two inches of snow are predicted. (Gothamist)

“Fighting” Shirley Chisholm will be honored with a monument in Prospect Park as part of the SheBuiltNYC program. Chisholm championed racial and gender equality, helping the poor, ending the Vietnam War, was the first woman to run for president on the Democratic ticket, and that’s just the start. The monument will be installed near the Parkside Ave entrance in 2020. (Curbed)

Inside The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Carnegie Deli pop-up. (Untapped Cities)

Coney Island is lit up for the holidays for the first time in decades. (Brooklyn Paper)

There’s a basement farm in Tribeca that supplies the city’s restaurants with freshly grown herbs. (Gothamist)

The first of three hearings about how the Amazon HQ2 deal came to be will take place on December 12. (6sqft)

How hard is painting a straight double yellow line? It seems like it’s harder than it seems, based on the Department of Transportation’s handiwork on Neptune Avenue. (Bklyner)

Step back 111 years with these recently colorized photo an elephant parade in Coney Island. (Viewing NYC)

Ground was broken on a $2.8 million Queens Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Elmhurst Park last week. (amNY)

Two more Proud Boys were arrested. Kyle Borello, 31, and Jake Freijo, 26, were charged with misdemeanor riot and attempted assault charges. The Proud Boys are a SPLC designated hate group and the FBI classifies it as an “extremist group with ties to white nationalism.” (Gothamist)

The Strand is fighting against landmark status. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

At least eight hospitals in the city were caught by Attorney General Barbara Underwood’s office for illegally billing sexual assault victims for rape kits. (Gothamist)

How two menorah’s that are the exact same height are fighting for the title of “world’s largest.” (6sqft)

Everything you need to know about the Times Square New Year’s Eve ball drop without actually having to go to Times Square. (StreetEasy)

12 Hannukah specials in city restaurants. (Eater)

Taxi prices will go up in January and the city is looking to level the playing field by passing legislation that forces Uber and Lyft into a comparable price hike. (NY Post)

As if things couldn’t look worse for the NYCHA, an executive’s secretary was arrested after finding 1,800 sleeves of heroin in her apartment. (NY Post)

The 23rd St F/M station has re-opened and features a set of colorful William Wegman Weimaraner mosaics. (Gothamist)

The real reason Amazon picked Long Island City for HQ2. (CityLab)

Meet the Staten Island lawyer accused of creating fake social media profiles to sway local elections. (NY Times)

The Verrazzano Bridge is already the most expensive bridge to cross in the nation before the MTA raises the price by $2 in March. (NY Post)

Are you the butterfinger who dropped your engagement ring down a grate while proposing in Times Square? The NYPD found your ring and is looking to give it back. (NY Post)

Brooklyn Bridge Park’s The Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory may be shutting down. Their license is up with the city and the city is looking for new proposals. (NY Post)

Orthodox Jewish parents have to balance their concern about a lack of a proper education their children may get at yeshivas with how they may be shunned within their own communities. (NY Post)

Watch Ryan Seacrest go on a painfully awkward pizza tour of the city. (Live with Kelly and Ryan)

After its second weekend, Winterfest continues to disappoint. Organizers sold tickets to attractions that didn’t exist, vendors have begun to pull out, and the Brooklyn Museum has publicly stated their disappointment. (NY Post)

It would seem wrong to hold the New York State Yo-Yo Contest anywhere but Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

17 comforting places to get hot pot. (Eater)

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