The Briefly for February 13, 2020 – The “Are We Ready for an NYC Yang Gang?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo negotiates for the Trusted Traveler Program to return, Pennsy is closing, a spiked seltzer festival is coming, the Knicks are worth too much, and more

Today – Low: 30˚ High: 48˚
Light rain until evening.

Pennsy, the food hall attached to Madison Square Garden, is closing at the end of the month. The closure is part of a renovation of the area by Vornado Realty Trust, the landlord, and extend the first four floors of the building. Hiding in this news the announced closure of The Cinnamon Snail, the amazing vegan eatery with fantastic desserts, for good. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

What the hell is going on at Etiquette in Williamsburg, a cafe and bar that features a queen-sized bed. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Photos: Jeff Leatham’s Kaleidoscope at the New York Botanical Garden Orchid Show, which adds light installations and sculpture to the show. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

2021’s mayoral candidates think we need more education about ranked choice voting. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Will the math add up for Andrew Yang to run for mayor? (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Governor Cuomo seems to have come to an agreement with the Trump administration that would allow New Yorkers back into the Trusted Traveler Program without giving the federal government unfettered access to the state’s DMV records. (Azi Paybarah and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The NYPD arrested a journalist for filming an arrest of a man in Chinatown. It is 100% legal in NYC to photograph or video record anything that is happening in public, including police actions, as long as you’re not in the way. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

NYC is coronavirus free! All suspected cases were negative. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Photos: Backstage at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. (Photos by Milo Hess for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Momo, the city’s hospital system’s very good first resident therapy dog. (Lydia Hu for NY1)

Here comes the city’s first ever spiked seltzer festival on May 16. Oh boy. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

The inside story of the long, slow, and painful death of Fairway. (Hannah Howard for Grub Street)

Come on restaurants, post your menus with prices online. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

How to make a reservation in NYC. It’s not always as simple as opening an app. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

These are the city’s top high schools, with Trinity High School coming in at #1 overall and Stuyvesant as the top public high school. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

With a seven season losing streak, the Knicks have been a very bad team for a long time, but that doesn’t seem to impact their value. The team was valued at $4.6 billion, making it unlikely that someone is rich enough to take the team from James Dolan’s grubby hands. (Gus Saltonstall for Patch)

The R-42 subway cars have been retired from service after fifty years years of use. (NY1)

Photos: The last ride for the R-42s with a cameo from Train Daddy Andy Byford. (Sydney Pereira, photos by David “Dee” Delgado for Gothamist)

Tension surrounding Morningside Park has not eased since the murder of Tessa Majors. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Video: A walk over the Brooklyn Bridge, through the city’s ugliest subway station, and Battery Park. (Action Kid)

Lawyers representing undocumented immigrants are fighting to stop ICE officers from making arrests at courthouses, which they say are interfering with court cases. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

There is a potential battle in Albany brewing over bail reform, with Governor Cuomo saying the door is open for possible changes, some state senators have jumped on the opportunity to voice their displeasure with the bill they passed last year before anyone has had time to properly judge its repercussions. Albany will always find a way to fight with itself. (Zack Fink for NY1)

When Mario’s Pizza on Arthur Avenue in the Bronx opened in 1915, the biggest concern was World War I, 100 years later it’s still going strong. (The pizza place, not the war) (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Debutante Balls still exist in Manhattan. (James Barron and Elizabeth D. Herman for NY Times)

The 38 best beer bars in NYC. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Mackenzie for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for December 16, 2019 – The “A Bathroom Grows in Brooklyn” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The NYPD’s secret gang database isn’t going anywhere, the fate of electric bikes and scooters hangs in the balance, the best new restaurants of 2019, & more

Today – Low: 36˚ High: 37˚
Light rain in the evening and overnight.

Late night disruptions are headed to the 7, A, F, J, and Q trains this week. Check the trains before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

From the inspiration wall to the sprinkle pool, a look inside the Museum of Ice Cream, which opened over the weekend. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Tenants in two Upper East Side NYCHA developments are suing to correct years of neglect and pervasive dysfunction, which were estimated to be at $100 million in 2017. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A bathroom grows in Bushwick. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The de Blasio administration has reached a deal with homeless advocates and City Council members to require certain developers receiving city funding to set aside 15 percent of their new rental units for homeless New Yorkers. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Check out the anti-slavery landmark interactive story map from the Landmarks Preservation Commission. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

This one’s worded a little weird. The headline is “areas that weren’t a thing 10 years ago,” and I’d argue that Gowanus or the Brooklyn Navy Yard existed, but they weren’t real estate hot spots. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

The NYPD keeps a secret database of somewhere between 17,500 and 37,000 people, called the “Criminal Group Database.” There’s no evidence why you are included or how to get off it. The gang database is the target of the “Erase the Database” campaign, but the new NYPD commissioner and the mayor are both staunch supporters of it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A 13-year-old boy was arrested and charged in connection to the fatal stabbing of 18-year-old Barnard student Tessa Majors. The NYPD believes two additional people were involved in the stabbing. (Michael Gold, Jan Ransom and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times)

The sense of safety that Morningside Park, which separates Columbia University from Harlem, has carried is recent years has changed with 20 robberies this year and punctuated with Tessa Majors’ murder. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

There’s a rumor that an abandoned train car with bullet-proof armor under the Waldorf Astoria was used by FDR to transport his limousine. While Baggage Car 002, the train car in question, wasn’t FDR’s, Track 61 has been used to move presidents and other government officials in and out of the Waldorf from the 30s through 2017. Baggage Car 002 is now at the Danbury Railway Museum. (Adam Thalenfeld for NYC Urbanism)

Photos: Inside the Schitt’s Creek pop-up shop. (Jen Carlson, photos by Scott Lynch for Gothamist

Manhattan’s “bad cops list” has been released. DA Cyrus Vance released the list of NYPD officers with credibility problems in court thanks to a Freedom of Information request from WNYC/Gothamist. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

The Department of Transportation is turning to a new tactic with a series of Vision Zero ads targeting drivers: shame. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: More from the inside of the Museum of Ice Cream. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Jazmine Headley reached a $625,000 settlement with the city for the “formative incident of trauma” when her child was ripped from her during an arrest inside a assistance center. She was arrested for sitting on the floor and spend four nights in Rikers Island. Her arrest was caught on video and went viral. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s struggling actors have a new side hustle. Say goodbye to actor-waiters and say hello to actor-spin instructors. (Jae Thomas for Bedford + Bowery)

Governor Cuomo has a bill to legalize electric bikes and scooters, but there is no sign that he will sign it. (Zack Finn for NY1)

A look at the gossip inside the Gambino crime family, following the murder to the reputed underboss Francesco Cali in March. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Mayor Bill de Blasio say the NYPD’s arrest rate is “high” for hate crimes. The number is 42%. (Samir Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Governor Cuomo is looking to prevent people from getting a New York gun license if they have committed a serious crime in another state, including misdemeanors like forcible touching and other sex offenses. This is the first public proposal that will be outlined in his 2020 state of the state speech. (amNewYork)

The MTA rolled out its first all-electric articulated bus on Sunday, one of a new fleet that is part of the agency’s plan to shift away from diesel-powered buses in the years ahead. Articulated buses are double the length of a normal bus. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 26, 2019 – The “This Comes With A $10k Toilet” Edition

The US Open owes $300,000 in rent, Corey johnson writes for food access, New York’s red flag gun law goes into place, new restaurant openings and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Monday means another week of late-night subway changes and disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Public Library’s Hunters Point branch is opening on September 24, after 4 years of construction. (Curbed)

All the big tech companies in the city, mapped. (The Real Deal)

Would you expect anything less than a $10,000 toilet in a $29 million home? (Architectural Digest)

The U.S. Open generates more than $750 million per year in “direct economic impact” to New York City and employs over 7,000 people each, but it also owes the city $300,000 in rent. (amNY)

Welcome to the weirdest office in the city. (Untapped Cities)

New York’s “red flag” gun bill went into effect over the weekend, which allows removal of their guns if a family member, law enforcement officer or educator successfully petitions the court. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Pacific Park, which was previously named Atlantic Yards, is the epicenter of the latest city vs state battle. The state gave approval for a massive underground gym to be added to the development and local officials are outraged that no concessions were made, especially since the developers are already behind in their commitment to creating affordable housing. (Brooklyn Paper)

Via for Schools will give parents and students the ability to track their bus’ locations in realtime. Last year thousands of kids experiencing multi-hour bus rides home from school. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court upheld a rule that bans for-hire vehicles like Uber and Lyfts from having ads inside and on top of the vehicle.

New York’s license plates are changing, but the way they’re made will not be. License plates are made by prisoners earning $0.65/hour at the Auburn Correctional Facility. (Gothamist)

There have been no new measles cases reported in August and with the number stopped at 654, this may signal the end fo the measles outbreak that started in September 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Department of Corrections at Rikers Island cannot legally put an 18 – 21-year-old in solitary confinement, but that doesn’t mean they haven’t found a new form of extreme isolation, this one without any restrictions. (Gothamist)

The Spotted Pig has been in trouble since owner Ken Friedman was accused of groping his female staffers and other sexual misconduct. Foot traffic is down because a declining number of people want to support a business owned by that kind of monster. Now, with foot traffic and revenue down, Ken Friedman sees the writing on the wall and is open to selling. (Eater)

Here are the buildings in the city with the most elevator complaints. (Curbed)

She’s been making breakfast on the city’s streets for over 35 years. Meet the woman behind Mama Jo’s Breakfast Cart and self-proclaimed oldest street vendor in New York City, Mama Jo. (Viewing NYC)

You may not be invited over to Meryl Streep’s townhouse, but you can see what it looks like on the inside through this $18.25 million real estate listing. (Curbed)

It’s late August and someone on the corner of First Ave and third Street just put their Christmas tree on the curb. Amazing. (EV Grieve)

Photos from the Official Animal Rights March. (EV Grieve)

6 ways to celebrate National Dog Day in New York City. (amNY)

Be careful with your children and dogs in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Morningside Park. Deadly, toxic algae blooms have been found in all three parks. The Prospect Park Dog Beach is still safe. These blooms are likely side-effects of the recent, intense rains which have been linked to climate change. (NY Times)

A look back at Mayor David Dinkins, 30 years after his historic 1989 election to become the first black mayor of New York City. (Gotham Gazette)

Corey Johnson’s latest op-ed argues that access to adequate, nutritious food is a human right. (Chelsea Now)

7 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to Leah Bassity for today’s featured image.