The Briefly for December 11, 2019 – The “See Something, Cease & Desist Something” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: SantaCon’s party yachts have been canceled, witchy holiday markets, ask a librarian, the Trash Train contest finds a winner, and more

Today – Low: 27˚ High: 39˚
Light snow in the morning.

Here’s what to expect with next month’s sweeping bail reforms. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Comparing someone to David Duke doesn’t speak highly of them. When it’s one of the NYPD’s top cops? That’s the comparison made to Deputy Inspector Constantin Tsachas for comments he made about NYPD officers targeting black and Latinx men on the subways. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

A new law will force some new constructions and renovations to use glass that is bird-friendly, to prevent birds from accidentially killing themselves by hitting the glass. The NYC Audobon Society estimates 90,000 – 230,000 birds die in the city due to window collisions. (Ryan F. Mendelbaum for Gizmodo)

Let’s check in on those adorable red-tailed hawks in Tompkins Square Park.. OHGOD IT IS EATING THAT PIGEON. (Laura Goggin Photography)

The MTA’s “See Something, Say Something” slogan is trademarked and they are happy to send cease and desist letters to other cities. Enjoy your C&D, Buffalo. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

SantaCon’s five free party yachts, sponsored by Fireball whiskey, were canceled thanks to concern from City Councilmember Keith Powers, State Senator Brad Hoylman, and Assembly Member Harvey Epstein. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Not all things have been discovered, until now. Congrats are in order to Joe Dator, who has discovered the two hot dog bun. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

The fleet of dollar vans have a new app and an aim to disrupt the city’s buses. (Kimko de Freitas-Tamura for NY Times)

Why is it necessary for the City Council to compel the NYPD to prioritize on towing illegally parked vehicles? Ah, here it is. It’s part of the attempt to crack down on parking placard abuse, a favorite pastime of the NYPD. (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

Andres “Andy” Fernandez was found guilty of second-degree murder of L&B Spumoni Gardens owner Louis Barbati. He faces 25 to life when sentenced next month. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

11 witchy, queens, and unique holiday markets. (Cassidy Dawn Graves for Bedford + Bowery)

The founder of Barstool Sports David Portnoy, SantaCon if it were a person, is opening a pizzeria. He’s being investigated by the National Labor Relations Board for threats of firing employees who discussed unionization, he’s made a habit of threatening and harassing female reporters, and is all around disease. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

New York state lost a lawsuit against Exxon-Mobile that claimed the company engaged in fraud through its statements about how it accounted for the costs of climate change regulation. (John Schwartz for NY Times)

Got a question and don’t feel like Googling? Call an NYPL librarian. (Great Big Story)

Tin Pan Alley, a part of 28th between Broadway and Sixth, is now recognized as a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Tin Pan Alley is the birthplace of American popular music. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The laminated pollo bar, the limoncello pistachio bar, and the rest of the the five must-eat items from Brooklyn’s all-day cafe explosion. (Nikitia Richardson for Grub Street)

Got a better name for Bridge & Tunnel Park in Long Island City? The Parks Department is looking for ideas. (Kristen Torres for LIC Post)

Rudy Giuliani, the mayor-turned-goblin, and estranged wife Judith have come to a settlement to avoid a divorce trial. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Staten Island’s Republican City Council Members Joe Borelli and Steven Matteo are introducing legislation to create a task for to explore a Staten Island secession. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Essex Crossing is hiding a nasty secret: A Vision Zero nightmare on the East side of the development. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

A look at the appalling conditions of the apartments that the homeless of New York City have been assigned in Newark. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure has never been more true than the trash treasures found at the bottom of the Gowanus Canal that will eventually find a home in a museum. (Gowanus Lounge)

Here’s the winner of the “Trash Train” photo contest held by the Transport Workers Union Local 100. The photo is of the aftermath of someone dropping a deuce between subway cars. The contest was held to highlight the need to add back cleaning jobs that cut back the times trains are cleaned by 50%. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Interested in the rest of the Trash Train entries? With photo titles like “Fluids?,” “Two Puddles of Vomit,” and “Number 2 done expressly on the #2 Express,” click the link at your own risk. (Train Train)

Pete Wells’s top 10 new restaurants in the city. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Congrats to the winners of this year’s Eater Awards for restaurant of the year, design of the year, and bakery of the year. (Eater)

Thanks to Mary von Aue for today’s featured image

The Briefly for December 9, 2019 – The “Amazon Comes Crawling Back” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Rezoning leads to gentrification, the NYPD is being sued for racist policies, the worst meals of 2019, SantaCon on a boat, and more

The only late-night disruptions on the subways this week are on the 4, 6, D, E, J, and Q trains. Read up before you head out. (Subway Weekender)

Does rezoning lead to gentrification? A study looking at two rezonings during the Bloomberg administration in Park Slope and the Greenpoint-Williamsburg waterfront shows the populations of black and Latino residents dropped by the thousands while the overall population of the neighborhoods grew. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

With the results of that study, there is pressure on the City Council to pass legislation that would require the city to predict demographical changes before a neighborhood is rezoned. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Hello Amazon, look who came crawling back and is opening a new office in Hudson Yards without any taxpayer subsidies. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

>Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is for her stance on HQ2 in Long Island City. (@AOC)

The governor and mayor, whose administrations are responsible for the failed HQ2, are still pointing fingers. Cuomo is pointing fingers at the politicians who stepped up in opposition to the deal and de Blasio is blaming Amazon for walking away. (Amy Russo for HuffPost)

The NYPD were targeting black and hispanic people for minor offenses in the subways from 2011 to 2015. That’s not only according to a lawsuit, but also multiple sworn statements from NYPD officers. (Joseph Goldstein and Ashley Southall for NY Times)

The NYCHA has issued a “heat action plan,” which establishes a protocol to fix and prevent heat outages. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

What did your street look like in the 1800s? Check it out with OldNYC’s StreetView-like viewer. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The top 10 secrets of Chumley’s, the Greenwich Village speakeasy from 1922. (Claire Leaden for Untapped New York)

Six Astoria restaurants with outdoor dining all year long. (Claire Leaden for We Heart Astoria)

A Park Slope substitute teacher is in trouble after telling his class of 1st graders that Santa isn’t real during a class about convincing. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s been three years since the last gun buyback program in the city. What’s the history of buyback programs and why has it been so long since the last one? (Noah Goldberg for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A look at the history of the Queensboro Bridge. (Lannyl Stephens for GVSHP)

Are the governor and mayor’s strategies to help the city’s homeless working? The answer is somewhere between the data collected is “vague” and completely inconclusive. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

Congressperson Max Rose is trying to save the Staten Island Yankees from obvilion. Part of MLB’s reasoning for announcing the elimination of the team is unacceptable time travel for teams and players not receiving a fare wage for their services. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The list of restaurants ordered closed is back this week with a new entry into the 100+ point violation club. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Why is Mike Bloomberg lying that no one asked him about stop-and-frisk until now? (Amy Russo for HuffPost)

The best holiday markets in NYC. (Ameena Walker for Curbed)

31 literary icons of Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

If you don’t like the idea of SantaCon you’re really not gonna like the idea of Fireball whiskey sponsored SantaCon party yachts. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Are you a bus? (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

Congrats Tribeca, you beat 90210 as the nation’s most expensive zip code. (Kathleen Culliton for amNewYork)

Lucky Lee’s, which claimed to have “clean” Chinese food, is closed a year after it opened. (Serena Dai)

Forget the best. Here are the worst dishes of 2019. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for December 3, 2019 – The “Jet Engine Powered Snow Blowers” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest with standing up to big real estate, the best restaurants in Crown Heights, an NYPD cop walking into a queer dance night with a Trump lanyard, and more.

A truly amazing interactive history of today’s subway map, including the history of the map, its digitization and you may learn a few things along the journey. (Antonio de Luca and Sasha Portis for NY Times)

Bill de Blasio is having an immature fit about Mike Bloomberg’s presidential run. Is it jealousy that Bloomberg’s campaign is more successful than de Blasio’s could ever hope to be or is it that de Blasio has always been petty and petulent when it comes to his predecessor? (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

How does the MTA deal with snowstorms? Jet engine powered snow blowers. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Imagine going to see Slave Play on Broadway to interrupt a Q&A session to complain that the playwright is “racist against white people.” Say hello to Talkback Tammy. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

This was the year that New York state and city government stood up to big real estate interests and made appreciable change. The real estate industry is looking for new ways to influence governmental decisions moving forward. (John Leland for NY Times)

The best restaurants in Crown Heights. (The Infatuation)

The NRA is challenging a city law that was aimed at stopping interstate gun trafficking in the Supreme Court. A decision isn’t expected until June. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

Remember last year’s HOLLAND TONNEL Christmas decoration OCD nightmare? This year’s decorations are much less cringe-worthy. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

Welcome to the Dermot Shea era of the NYPD. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Have you had a package mysteriously disappear from your building? You’re not alone. 90,000 packages go missing every day. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Haag for NY Times)

The “Brooklyn’s Fyre Festival” nightmare is never-ending. Arch-villain and architect of the Frozen Fare Festival Lena Romanova is suing the Brooklyn Daily Eagle for defamation for its coverage of Winterfest, the winter shitshow to end all winter shitshows at the Brooklyn Museum one year ago. Winterfest is, thankfully, never coming back. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An NYPD officer walked into a queer dance night in Jackson Heights for an inspection wearing a Trump lanyard on Sunday. Officers are required to remain politically neutral and as a result their commander is investigating the inspection. (Max Parrott for QNS)

The homes in Ozone Park that were flooded with the city’s raw sewage have been pumped from the basements and officials are blaming the backup on a possible “Fatberg.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Stay ho ho home. SantaCon is coming. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

10 new public art installations to see this month. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Empire State Building’s new $165 million 80th floor observatory is open. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A first look at the new Rockefeller Center pedestrian zones. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The York Street F-line station may be one of the city’s most potentially dangerous. The station serves 14,000 workers and 4,000 residents who travel through the station’s single stairwell with no escalator, elevator, or second exit. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

CitiBike’s pedal assisted electric bikes are coming back “this winter,” breaking the promise for a fall return. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The Eater 38, 38 restaurants that define New York City’s dining scene right now, has been updated with Williamsburg’s Gertie making the list. (Eater)