The Briefly for April 20, 2020 – The “A Museum That Delivers Ice Cream” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Rent strikes do not get the mayor’s support, the best Indian takeout, the City Council moves to give 75 miles of city roads to people and bikes, and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 56˚
Overcast throughout the day.

“What a week.” “It’s Monday morning.” Breweries and bars delivering craft beer. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Wearing face masks when it’s not possible to socially distance is now a requirement. (Share Weaver for Time Out)

The Times asks the hard-hitting question: Are face masks the new condoms? (James Gorman for NY Times)

Come back when your nose and mouth are covered.” The new MTA mask awareness campaign is pretty on point. (Brandan Krisel for Patch)

A museum that delivers? Yes, if that museum is The Museum of Ice Cream. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

What’s it like to set up one of the dozens of refrigerated trailers across the city acting as temporary morgues? Here’s the experience of Erik Frampton, who took a temporary job in a truck that can hold 110 bodies at a time. (Arun Venugopal for Gothamist)

11 numbers that show how the novel coronavirus has changed NYC (Corina Knoll, Azi Paybarah, Jacob Meschke and Elaine Chen for NY Times)

We’ve all developed a weird habit or two while staying at home. Leigh Plessner can’t stop buying artisanal jams. (Leigh Plessner for Grub Street)

Video: #SoundTheHorn for transit workers in Grand Central Terminal. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio: “I don’t agree with a rent strike.” (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Mayor de Blasio is going to be forced to open up the city’s streets to pedestrians and cyclists. A bill in City Council is moving forward this week as Mayor de Blasio might be forced to actually let the people of the city stretch out a little bit. This will, of course, push the mayor beyond his pathetic open streets idea that collapsed within a week. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Video: Comparing what a walk down Broadway pre- and mid-COVID-19 outbreak. (ActionKid)

One of the prisoners being released into home custody because of COVID-19 concerns? Michael Cohen. (Benjamin Weiser and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Jeff Bezos bought a fourth apartment at 212 Fifth Avenue for $16 million, bringing his total investment in the building to $96 million. $16 million for Jeff Bezos is the equivalent to $9.50 for an average American family in 2018. (Laura Vecsey for StreetEasy)

55 years and 37,000 historic designations all in one interactive map. Now you can see the history of the Landmarks Preservation Commission in one place. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development requested on Friday that owners of city-funded buildings with income-targeted housing allocate up to 30 percent of those apartments for homeless people. (Sam Raskin for Curbed)

20% of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have taken place inside of nursing homes, and the nine nursing homes with the highest body counts are in the city. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

One thing that is pushing forward like nothing is wrong is health inspections, but no fines are being issued. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Video: “Suck my dick” isn’t exactly what you’d expect to hear from the megaphone of an NYPD officer, but here’s the video anyway. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know about the city’s remote learning plan since it looks like students will be remote learning for the rest of the year. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

A photographer with a license to fly drones from the FAA had his drone confiscated by the NYPD for trying to film the mass burials on Hart Island. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The MTA is facing an $8 billion loss, but that won’t stop it from hiring all 500 new subway cops this year, costing an additional quarter billion over four years. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Temporarily the NYPD will be focusing more on the subways and private security is being hired due to a 55% rise in crime while ridership plummets. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Anything happening in May has been canceled in the city and June isn’t looking so great either. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

June events being canceled means that this year’s Pride March is in doubt. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Also on the chopping block for June is the Puerto Rican Day Parade. (Michael Scotto for NY1)

Apartment Porn: 21-foot-high ceilings, carved marble fireplaces, and built in 1873. An $8 million Upper East Side townhouse that feels like an Italian chateau. I don’t know what an Italian chateau feels like, but I’m trusting their opinion here. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The city’s enforcement of the plastic bag ban has been delayed to June. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Video: How far will $1,200 get you in the city? (Patrick Mulligan for NY City Lens)

While things are still bad when it comes to COVID-19, there are small signs of improvement. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork Metro)

New Yorkers can get married and it can happen online. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Where to get Indian takeout and delivery. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Annie for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 10, 2019 – The “MTA Gets A Taste Of Their Own Medication” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC will pause sending its homeless to the slums on Newark, de Blasio’s paid vacation bill is stalled in the City Council, the best dishes, and more

Beetlejuice needs a new home on Broadway. It’s being evicted from the Winter Garden Theater on June 6 to make way for “The Music Man” starring Hugh Jackman. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Holiday windows you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Con Ed, who had a banner summer in New York, is raising its rates in 2020, 2021, and 2022. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The MTA spent $600 million on 300 subway cars and only 18 arrived on time. These are the same trains that are less reliable than ones 30 years old. So not only are they providing poor service, but they’re also regularly late. Who does that sound like? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re the kind of person who goes out of your way to avoid hearing anyone singing Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas is You,” you you’ll want to avoid the Mariah Carey Christmas pop-up shop this weekend. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The city will suspend its program sending homeless New Yorkers to slums and condemned apartment buildings in Newark after the city of Newark filed a lawsuit in an attempt to stop the practice. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Fire up your Instagram account, the Museum of Ice Cream is back. (Lorence Fabricant for NY Times)

Imagine the kind of SantaCon-inspired event that even the SantaCon NYC organizers feel the need to distance themselves from. Welcome to SantaCon Hoboken. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York’s most iconic Art Deco buildings, mapped. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

The mayor has tried to push his paid vacation legislation through the City Council, but despite his announcement that the city would pass it this year, it appears to be stuck in limbo with opposition from small businesses and Speaker Corey Johnson. Maybe if he spent more time being the mayor and less cosplaying as a presidential candidate there would have been a chance. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The man who ate the $120,000 banana at Art Basel Miami Beach is Brooklyn artist David Datuna. He was not arrested for eating the banana. (Maya Kaufman and Staff for Patch)

If you’re craving more banana and duct tape art, street artist Joseph Grazi spent his weekend “creating” new works near the Essex Street Market. (Bowery Boogie)

Photos: Inside the former Coffee Shop in Union Square-turned-Chase bank. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Nightmare: Two women fell between subway cars and the train started moving at Broadway Junction shortly after midnight on Sunday. One woman died and the other is in stable position. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

7 enormous unfinished NYC infrastructure projects poised to change the city in the 2020s. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Mapping the tech takeover of New York City. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Working in an Amazon warehouse is more dangerous than working in a coal mine, and 42 members of the City Council, State Senate and Assembly are demanding safety improvements in the Staten Island warehouse. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Infatuation’s favorite new dishes of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 23, 2019 – The “Can No Longer Get Away With Murder” Edition

NYC’s students are still less than 50% proficient in English and math, 15 restaurants to BYOB, Di Fara reopens, the Museum of Ice Cream find a home, and more in today’s NYC news digest

This weekend’s scheduled subway disruptions look minimal on the surface, but the 1, 2, 3 and 5 trains are still taking a big hit. (Subway Weekender)

The Times is starting to take guesses as to when the mayor finally ends his joke of a presidential bid. (NY Times)

The Museum of Ice Cream is getting a permanent home in Soho on Broadway this fall. Get your Instagram accounts ready. (Curbed)

The NYC Police Benevolent Association’s response to the Daniel Pantaleo firing, who caused the death of Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, is to tour the city’s precincts to say that “no one has our backs,” circulating photos of James O’Neill saying he’s “wanted for killing the NYPD,” and posting in a message board for police officers called the “Law Enforcement Rant” calling Eric Garner’s family “savages” and “ghetto dwellers.” It’s like they no longer think they can get away with murder at their jobs. (Gothamist)

There used to be a bowling alley in the basement, the secret top floor bar, and more secrets of the Jane Hotel. (Untapped Cities)

Keens in Midtown is wallpapered with history, with newspaper clippings, photos, playbills, etc on display all over the steakhouse. Until recently, that history included about 10 pieces that featured racist stereotypes. Nothing will put a hamper on your night like finding out your “thumbs up” photo with your steak also featured a large “rival darkies” minstrel show ad in the background. (Eater)

A venomous snake went missing two weeks ago in the Bronx Zoo’s “Jungle World” exhibit. It’s still missing. (Bronx Times)

A man was crushed to death by an elevator in Kips Bay in an elevator that was ordered to be shut down in May by the Department of Buildings. (NY Times)

Billionaire’s Row residents tried to take the mayor up on his offer to do “anything” to rescue the Di Fara pizzeria by offering to pay Di Fara’s tax bill if the mayor would stop a homeless shelter from opening in their neighborhood. (Patch)

No need, because Di Fara reopened on Thursday afternoon. (Grub Street)

NYC student achievement is rising, but still, only 46% of the city’s third through eighth-graders passed the state’s math exam and only 47% passed the English exam. Both numbers are up from last year, but both fall short of the city’s 50% goal. (NY Times)

The 7 train continues to drop debris from its elevated tracks in Queens. This time it was a piece of metal the size of a brick that luckily avoided hitting anyone. The MTA has installed netting as part of a pilot program in some areas of the 7 train, but clearly not in enough locations. (Gothamist)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge is scheduled to open next month, four years ahead of schedule. (Sunnyside Post)

The Department of Homeless Services announced a joint operation between DHS and NYPD in an effort to offer services and not punishment to the city’s homeless on the subways. (Curbed)

Next month the MLB FoodFest brings foods from every Major League Baseball stadium to Midtown. You won’t have to go to Texas to get the dilly-dog: a hot dog stuffed inside a pickle and fried like a corn dog. (amNY)

The top 15 restaurants where you can BYOB. (Eater)