The Briefly for July 19, 2019 – The “It’s Called the Urban Heat Island Effect” Edition

The mayor wasted $220 million, ConEd keeps blacking out, an AriZona Iced Tea pop-up shop ends arrests, the best brunch spots, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Portions of the R, L, 1, 5, and N trains are out this weekend, the 3 is out completely and more “fun” in this weekend’s planned subway disruptions and diversions. (Subway Weekender)

The story of Preserved Fish, the man. (Untapped Cities)

If it seems like the city heats up like an oven, you’d be right. The concrete absorbs heat, the glass reflects it, and the lack of open space prevents the heat from dissipating. It’s called the “Urban Heat Island Effect.” (Gothamist)

Quickly, what borough has the highest number of home listings with pools? Turns out it’s the Bronx. (Localize Labs)

This is the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard of, and I wanna be the best at it,” a firsthand account of the ecstasy and the agony of the Brooklyn Air Guitar Championships. (Hard Noise)

In 2015, the mayor spent $220 million to ensure that 5,000 apartments in Stuy Town would remain rent-regulated until at least 2035. When the state passed rent reforms, it made that $220 million irrelevant. (Gothamist)

If you’re on the 1, 2, or 3 lines, you’re gonna get hit with some major subway disruptions for the next month and a half of weekends. (6sqft)

“You’re the mayor. Use your authority. Because nothing has changed.” Protests outside city hall and police headquarters called for justice five years after the death of Eric Garner. (Gothamist)

State Assemblymember Helen Rosenthal wants to end New York state school incubator projects for good. It’s not uncommon for ducks to be dumped in city parks where they are defenseless and wildlife rehabilitators spend time to find, feed, and care for the domesticated ducks that can’t survive on their own. (I Love the Upper West Side)

ConEd’s failures continue as blackouts continue to be a problem in portions of the city. Manhole fires caused outages in Maspeth, Elmhurst, Sunset Park, Borough Park, Flushing, parts of the Bronx, and the Upper West Side (again). ConEd blames the manhole fires on the heat, they also blame manhole fires on the cold when it’s cold. (Gothamist)

American Idol is coming to Greenpoint for auditions on July 23, so get ready to watch a bunch of New Yorkers embarrass themselves on television soon. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: Think about the nightmare of standing on a subway platform looking at the tracks when suddenly a construction wall gives out behind you, sending a flood of water towards you, knocking you off your feet headed towards the tracks. That was the reality at the Court Square-23rd Street subway station on Wednesday night. (Gothamist)

8 things you may not know about the American Museum of Natural History. (6sqft)

AriZona Iced Tea tried to sell 99 cent Adidas shoes at a pop-up shop on the Bowery on Thursday morning. It ended with two assaults, arrests, and the NYPD shutting the whole event down. (Eater)

10 must-see art shows to help beat the heat. (NY Times)

A brief guide to bike etiquette. (Gothamist)

What’s going on in Sunset Park? A second body was found in the waters off Sunset Park in two days. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Lower East Siders don’t argue that their neighborhood needs protection from flooding, but the loudest among them don’t appear to want that protection if it means having to live without the East River Park for three and a half years. (Gothamist)

El Chapo has been taken to an “undisclosed location,” which means he’s finally out of New York City’s hair/a>. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s calls for “due process” when comes to the Eric Garner case are a part of a pattern the mayor executes to avoid taking a stand on controversial issues that arises as a result of potential police misconduct. (The Indypendent)

Everyone be on the lookout for this jerk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What is it about the Brooklyn Youth Chorus that has attracted artists like Beyoncé Elton John, Alicia Keys, Grizzly Bear, and more to collaborate with them? (NY Times)

There are only 24 recognized professional air hockey players in the world. The New York Air Hockey Club is always looking for the next great players. (NY Times)

New York doesn’t discriminate when it comes to what stores get tagged by graffiti artists. Welcome to Ludlow Street, Louis Vuitton. (Bowery Boogie)

The New York City Triathalon has been canceled as a result of the heatwave, scheduled to take place on the city’s first 100-degree day in seven years. (Patch)

“Beautiful,” the Carole King Broadway musical is closing at the end of October after six years and grossing a quarter billion dollars. (NY Times)

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is back in the city filming season 3. (West Side Rag)

Enter Sandman. This Sunday New York Yankee’s closer Mariano Rivera will be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. (amNY)

A new state law prohibits race discrimination based on hair or hairstyles. (The Root)

9 places to enjoy a delicious brunch in the city. (NY Times)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 16, 2019 – The “No One Knows What Caused the Blackout” Edition

ConEd is not untouchable, the Queens DA race is giving Bush v Gore vibes, the best restaurants in the East Village, the ice cream wars of Dumbo have begun, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Deep below the Flatiron Building, there’s an unused coal-fueled power plant that pre-dates the building’s steam systems. You probably will never get a personal tour of it, so experiencing it through this photo gallery is the closest you’ll get. (Untapped Cities)

The pizza wars of Dumbo continue on, but the ice cream war between Ample Hills and the Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory are only just beginning. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Want to prepare for the next (inevitable) blackout? Here’s a list of six things you can do to get yourself ready. (Curbed)

Why are so many of the escalators in the new Q train subway stations broken so often? Don’t ask the MTA, because they can’t figure it out. (amNY)

Put ConEd down in the same category as the MTA, because they can’t seem to get their story straight about what caused this blackout. (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo appears to be sick of ConEd’s shit between this outage, the fire in Astoria that lit the sky, and transformer fires in Lower Manhattan and Brooklyn, and he’s open to replacing them. (Gothamist)

How has ConEd responded to this massive outage? By making a public statement that the heat this week could cause more outages. Lovely. (Huff Post)

The cost of the blackout was $3.5 on Broadway alone, with 26 of 30 possible performances being canceled. Saturday in July is Broadway’s most popular night in the most popular month. (NY Times)

A brief history of blackouts in New York City. (amNY)

The NYPD won’t share details about an off-duty Queens cop who was arrested on charges of false imprisonment and assault, calling it a “confidential investigation” while flagrantly showing the NYPD’s “fundamental and pervasive lack of transparency,” as cited in a report earlier this year. (Gothamist)

From romantic to the club to sporty to outdoors: where to go for date night in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

Staten Island politicians are urging the governor to start a “microtransit” pilot program to expand transit options throughout the city’s largest borough. Microtransit refers to buses and not alternative modes of transportation, as Staten Island remains a borough without any bike lanes. (Curbed)

With Jeff Bezos buying a Manhattan apartment, protestors of Amazon have a new target to make their voices heard. (Patch)

It seemed the public call for volunteers worked, the Giglio Lift went off without a hitch last weekend, which is the largest of the lifts during Williamsburg’s Giglio Feast. The feast continues through the weekend with more lifts on Wednesday and Sunday nights. (Gothamist)

There is a fight for survival happening all around us, as invasive species are threatening the city’s flora. The problem is only a biodiversity one, but fighting invasive bugs and plants can be costly. The treatment and removal of ash trees due to a beetle infestation will cost the city nearly $10 million over three years. (amNY)

What’s the latest on the Mandarin Duck? He seems to have left the city a few months ago and we should expect him back after the summer. Ducks molt in the summer and while they’re flightless they look for safer and more private bodies of water. (Gothamist)

Residents of the financial district are trying to get the city to pump the brakes before construction begins on the last building in the World Trade Center in an attempt to keep the project selection process fair and to ensure the neighborhood benefits from another massive construction project. (amNY)

Photos from the Queens DA primary recount is giving off major Bush v Gore vibes. (NY Times)

The next expansions of CitiBike’s coverage will be painfully slow. The current roll-out will take until 2023– the service’s decade anniversary– to complete. (Streetsblog)

The statue outside of the Museum of Natural History of Teddy Roosevelt atop a horse, flanked by an African-American and a Native American was one of the monuments the city was reconsidered in 2017. The statue has attracted negative attention for Roosevelt’s racist views and statements about Native Americans and Africans and has been the target of protest multiple times since installation in 1940. The museum is leaning into controversy by highlighting the criticism of the statue and of the museum’s history to complicate and contextualize without glorification. (NY Times)

The best restaurants in the East Village. (The infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for July 3, 2019 – The “Pick A Side: Iced Coffee vs Cold Brew” Edition

Everything you need for July 4, the drink of the summer, new school gender inclusion guidelines, lying roaches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s the deal with the subways and buses on July 4. (6sqft)

Expect massive crowds and tight security if you’re checking out the fireworks over the east river. (Patch)

Safety tips for pet owners on July 4. (amNY)

Each year’s Fourth of July fireworks display in the city starts in the California desert, in 11 underground bunkers in high-security facilities. (NY Times)

What’s open and what’s closed on July 4. (Patch)

The New York Times is never why when it comes to controversy, and they jumped in head-first with this one. Is cold brew better than iced coffee? (NY Times)

Checking in with Tom’s Restaurant on the Upper West Side 30 years after Seinfeld‘s pilot aired. (Gothamist)

The top 10 secrets of Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. (Untapped Cities)

Despite every last inch of Manhattan having been developed, there is still wildlife. With the year half over, coyote sightings in Central Park are at quadruple the level they were for all of 2018. If you encounter one, leave it alone and report it. (I Love the Upper West Side)

While conservatives around the country are mounting challenges to Roe v Wade, New York City has become more accommodating to those seeking an abortion. Charities helping women afford abortions are seeing a higher percentage of those women come from outside the city. The city even set aside a quarter of a million dollars in support for the New York Abortion Access Fund to assist people from outside the city be able to afford an abortion. (Gothamist)

The okapi diorama at the Museum of Natural History is considered to be one of the world’s most impressive taxidermy dioramas. Here’s the story behind the diorama and even the one riddle/practical joke that can be found if you look close enough. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza issued new gender inclusion guidelines to better support the city’s 1.1 million students. The guide touches on sports, name and gender changes, dress codes, and more. While they are still only guidelines, they are being praised by advocacy groups as a good start. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Don’t be alarmed, but we’ve hit “the cockroaches are flying” time of year. (Gothamist)

Right now the city’s homeless shelters turn away people with pets, which becomes a real problem for the 10-25% of people experiencing homelessness who have pets. More than 98% of animals surrendered to the city’s Animal Care Centers in the last six months are due to their owners’ homelessness. Two bills making their way towards the city council could change that. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s restaurants have begun to embrace the latest food trend: chickpeas. (amNY)

Sometimes it’s better not to ask. Like, “What is that black, smelly liquid pouring out of the elevator at Grand Central?” Maybe that’s information we should never know. “Why was it gushing out and why did it smell like sewage?” These are more questions that should not be asked because you probably don’t want to know the answer. (Gothamist)

On any given day you can find multiple photos of NYPD vehicles using the city’s bike lanes like personal parking garages, which makes the mayor’s declaration that the NYPD is going to start taking drivers in the city’s bike lanes laughable. (Streetsblog)

Apologies to our mayor, who had his time in Iowa interrupted to discuss the three bicyclist deaths in the city in the last week. A “crisis,” but not enough of a crisis to deal with it within the confines of the city that he’s supposed to be in charge of. The mayor was short on details, aside from increased NYPD enforcement of pre-existing laws. (Gothamist)

The crackdown is not permanent, but a three-week targeted enforcement. (Streetsblog)

Fact-checking the president’s claims that New York’s taxes are driving people away. (NY Times)

Our president is a serial liar, so no one should be surprised that despite his claims that he’s never had an alcoholic drink that he regularly drank in New York City, according to a new book by Allen Salkin. (Vice)

The first section of a state park honoring the first African-American woman elected to Congress, Shirley Chisholm, is open in Brooklyn. (Curbed)

The city is speckled with the history of the revolutionary war if you know where to look. (amNY)

Remember the city’s styrofoam ban? It’s in effect and the first fines have been issued. (Gothamist)

Central Park’s Belvedere Castle is open after a 15-month renovation. (Time Out)

The drink of the summer: The Gin and Tonic Plus (Grub Street)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.