The Briefly for January 22, 2019 – The “23 Flavors of Public Advocate to Choose From” Edition

The subways get another speed boost, the K.G.B. Spy Museum opens, how Veselka became Veselka, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Information on what to do if you are renting and have problems with your heat or hot water. (nyc.gov)

The cartoonish hook pulling performers off the stage? It originated at Miner’s Theater in the Bowery. (Ephemeral New York)

The new K.G.B. Spy Museum is now open. No, it’s not in Trump Tower, it’s on W 14th Street. (NY Times)

The MTA may as well hire the young man who keeps stealing buses and taking them on joyrides. The NYPD is assuming he’s responsible for three “borrowed” buses. (Gothamist)

Welcome to Gowanus, where the cars use the sidewalks more than the pedestrians do. (Pardon Me for Asking)

With 23 candidates, is it possible to profile all the candidates for the city’s public advocate position? The Times gives it their best with a sentence or two on each. (NY Times)

Years ago, former Mayor Ed Koch started a movie review YouTube channel. Enjoy the mayor at the movies. (YouTube)

Students at Poly Prep High School in Dyker Heights organized a walkout in protest of the blackface video which became public last week. Students claim administrators have not done enough to address the incident and this was not an isolated incident. (Gothamist)

How a 24/7 pierogi spot became the legendary Veselka. (Insider)

More than 10,000 people in NYCHA apartments were without heat or hot water on Sunday, Monday, and part of Tuesday this week. (NY Post)

A peace officer is accused of groping a woman in Chinatown. Lindell Blai was off duty at the time. (Gothamist)

The MTA continues to work to increase speeds on the subways, with the R, J, Z, and 1 trains seeing a boost with more to come. Don’t get your hopes too high, of the 320 subway signals discovered to be malfunctioning, the MTA still has 261 to fix. (NY Post)

The history of Manhattan’s defensive wall to keep out foreign invaders and how it didn’t work. Wall Street stands in its place as a reminder. (Metro)

9 things to do in the city during the worst of winter. (New York Cliché)

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The Briefly for January 9, 2019 – The “Great Pizza Recipe Caper of 2019” Edition

The mayor wants to give healthcare to all, Corey johnson wants control of the subways and buses, $26 million was saved in rent thanks to the L train shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Threats of the L train shutdown saved renters in Williamsburg over $26 million in rent. A different version of this story could say “The L train shutdown cost landlords over $26 in rent. (Metro)

“Back of a taxi” is becoming a popular birth spot, with the second baby of the year being delivered while the meter was running. (NY Post)

The second large scale project Staten Island has lost in the last few months when the developers of the Riverside Galleria withdrew their plans after facing pressure from politicians. (The Real Deal)

For now, it seems like you can get a taste of Nolita uptown. The man behind Prince Street Pizza is suing a former chef for allegedly stealing the recipe for his famous spicy pepperoni slice and bringing it to the former chef’s new restaurant Made in New York Pizza on the Upper West Side. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio announce that the city will spend $100 million to provide health care for undocumented immigrants and others who cannot qualify for insurance. His vision is that the city would provide comprehensive care to everyone, including 300,000 undocumented New Yorkers. (NY Times)

The debate over Amazon’s HQ2 has unions squaring off with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union’s opposition at odds over the project with the Service Employees International Union and the Building and Construction Trades Council’s support. (The Real Deal)

The best coffee shops for meetings. (The Infatuation)

Welcome to 2019: the home of New York’s worst measles outbreak in decades. (NY Post)

It’s seemed inevitable that Willits Point was headed towards mega-development, but that inevitability has loomed overhead decades. A stadium for the Mets, a mall, and now the Queensborough Football Club have laid claim to the neighborhood, despite decade-old plans for mixed-income housing. (Gothamist)

SNL’s Michael Che is putting together “A Night for NYCHA” this Friday at Irving Plaza to benefit the Fund for Public Housing, featuring Jeff Ross, Michelle Wolf and a “top secret” lineup of comedians. There is a GoFundMe page for people who can’t attend but still want to donate (amNY)

A lawsuit was dismissed that claimed that Danny Meyer sat atop a New York restaurateur illuminati-esque group which sought to pocket tips intended for their staffs. (Eater)

Whatever happened to the toxic dust the MTA claimed would make a partial L train shutdown impossible? (Gothamist)

A Bronx pedestrian was killed by a driver of a city sanitation truck who was preemptively salting Willis Avenue at E. 138th Street. The driver was suspended and is cooperating with the NYPD. (Streetsblog)

What you need to know about the city’s special election for public advocate. (Curbed)

A dog museum? A dog museum. The AKC Museum of the Dog is opening on February 8 at 101 Park Avenue, bringing paintings, prints, sculptures, porcelain figurines, displays and more to two floors, including the first exhibition “For the Love of All Things Dog.” (USA Today)

Mario Batali, famous for orange Crocs, an apology that pairs with pizza dough cinnamon rolls, and being accused of sexual misconduct, will not be facing criminal charges for two sexual assaults that allegedly took place in 2004 and 2005. (Eater)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson will reveal a plan to wrestle control of the MTA’s subways and buses from the MTA within the next two months. Will he shutdown the shutdown of the shutdown? (Streetsblog)

A judge blocked Mayor de Blasio’s attempt to move carriage horses inside Central Park instead of being alongside cars on the streets. A full hearing will take place February 8. (NY Post)

Politicians can’t constitutionally block critics on official social media accounts. Looking at you State Senator Kevin “Kill Yourself” Parker and City Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. (Metro)

38 essential restaurants, winter edition. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 8, 2018 – The “No One Wants to Be On El Chapo’s Jury” Edition

Albany’s new faces, an investigation into Eric Garner’s death starts today, the elections aren’t over yet, a jury has been chosen for El Chapo’s trial, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Meet the five new faces headed to Albany to represent the city in the State Senate. (amNY)

The jury has been selected for the El Chapo trial, despite an “open rebellion” against the idea of being on the jury. (amNY)

Low-level marijuana enforcement is down 58% and arrests are down by 90% in one year’s time, thanks to Mayor de Blasio’s policy change in the spring. While the overall numbers decreased, it did not change the racial disparities of who is being policed. (Politico)

This is a different type of defense. A Columbia University student is claiming that he couldn’t have raped another student because he was “too drunk.” He claims to have drank enough to black out and claim he has a blood ties to Nazis. He sounds like a real winner. (NY Post)

10 memorable art installations at the Brooklyn Bridge, past and present. (Untapped Cities)

Of 142 garbage trucks from private companies inspected during the city’s one week crackdown, only ten were allowed to stay on the streets. During the week the city issued 1,070 summons. (NY Post)

You thought we were done with elections? With Letitia James becoming Attorney General on January 1, the city will schedule an election for Public Advocate. Anyone who can get enough signatures will be on the ballot. (amNY)

Not to be outdone by Shakespeare in the Park, Central Park’s SummerStage will also be getting an upgrade and will be ready for the 2019 season. (6sqft)

Is the Museum of Pizza “fine art”? (NY Post)

It’s time to go to The New York Botanical Garden, we’re almost at peak foliage. (amNY)

A guide to our current elected officials. (Curbed)

WFAN’s Craig Carton from “Boomer and Carton” is guilty of securities fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit fraud. He could be going to prison for 45 years. (NY Post)

Rudy Giuliani divorce is shining a light on his peculiar spending habits. (Gothamist)

The NYPD blames the “current atmosphere” for the rise in hate crimes across the city. Don’t forget the NYPD blamed the increase in reported rapes on the #MeToo movement earlier this year. (Gothamist, amNY)

Eric Garner died on July 17, 2014. Four years later, the Civilian Complaint Review Board is beginning an investigation. (NY Times)

7 of the city top chefs share their favorite bodega food. (NY Post)

The average salary in NYC is $68,992. (TitleMax)

The Board of Elections can’t promise that the 2020 election will be better than 2018’s. In 2016, the BOE rejected a city offer of $20 million to find and fix systemic problems. (NY Post)

Not to be outdone by Amazon, Google is planning on hiring thousands of new employees and adding 1.3 million square feet of office space on the West side of Manhattan. (NY Times)

A restaurant where you dine alone and don’t speak to, or see, your waiter. (NBC New York)

All the free museum days across the city. (Time Out)


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