The Briefly for June 19, 2019 – The “That’s Not Pizza, It’s A Strawberry Tart” Edition

The new head of the NYCHA is the highest paid city employee, the city okays six new LGBTQ landmarks, the MTA gets sued for its ad practices, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest,

2019 is the summer of the NYPL’s Bookmobile. The Bookmobile is making its debut this week, operating as a mobile library and offering all the same services. By the end of the summer, the NYPL will have three Bookmobiles. (Untapped Cities)

The Mermaid Parade is this weekend, here are the routes and street closures in the People’s Playground. (Curbed)

Dominique Ansel’s latest creation is here and boy is it an eye-roller. They’re tiramisu made to look like greek coffee cups, strawberry tarts that look like a slice of pizza, pavlova that looks like an everything bagel, and other twists on New York staples. (Time Out)

The new head of the NYCHA’s salary of $400,000 will make him the highest paid city official. Gregory Russ is going from the Minneapolis Housing Authority to the largest in the nation. The $400k salary is $231,000 higher than the last permanent head of the agency. (The City)

Three Lives, on the corner of Waverly and W 10th, has reopened after being closed by the Department of Buildings and having to sell books on the sidewalk. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

Someone left a life-like baby doll in Crocheron Park in Bayside, which triggered a full-on NYPD and FDNY response. (QNS)

DUMBO is celebrating the ten year anniversary of the Manhattan Bridge Archway becoming open to the public. Prior to its life as a plaza, it was used for Department of Transportation storage. (6sqft)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is covering up Marc Chagall’s “The Lovers” until Thursday in honor of World Refugee Day, to highlight what a world would look like without the art of refugees. (Gothamist)

Some suggestions for unofficial places to watch the July 4th fireworks. (Patch)

Add another entry to your list of unconventional museums in the city. Poster House is “the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters.” No word if there will be a blacklight and velvet section. (Untapped Cities)

Six of NYC’s historic LGBTQ sites are now city landmarks. The Gay Activists Alliance Firehouse, Caffee Cino, the LGBT Center, the Women’s Liberation Center, the James Baldwin Residence, and Audre Lorde’s Residence made the list. (Curbed)

The city’s critics seem to hate Au Cheval, but that isn’t slowing down people who willingly wait over an hour for a burger. (Grub Street)

Fighting back investors and developers, four areas of Sunset Park have received landmark designation from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, which will prevent demolition or large changes to the homes inside the landmark districts. Quick trivia: If you see a brown street sign instead of a green one, you’re in a historic district. (6sqft)

If someone visiting New York asked you how to get tickets to the Statue of Liberty, would you know how? Either buy them online or walk past the dozens of guys trying to sell you tickets all around Bowling Green and buy them at Castle Clinton. While the article is clearly an SEO play, it’s still something most New Yorkers probably didn’t know. (Curbed)

Where does the MTA draw the line with subway ads when it comes to sex? Boner pills, the Museum of Sex, breast implants, condoms, and Tinder all get the go ahead, but they draw the line with sex toys because they are a “sexually oriented business.” Dame Products is suing the MTA over their murky advertising rules. Somehow Tinder’s “DTF” campaign wasn’t about sex? (Patch)

A guide to the elections on June 25. (amNY)

An interview with State Senator Julia Salazar focused on real estate, which took place on the eve of the passage of the state’s new rent reform laws. (The Real Deal)

10 dishes under $20 to try in Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Mayor de Blasio nominated Jeffrey Roth, a deputy commissioner for policy and external affairs at the TLC, to lead the Taxi & Limousine Commission in a pick that, in the early stages, seems relatively free of controversy. He must be approved by the City Council before taking the position (amNY)

The city is debating banning Foie Gras as part of a dozen animal welfare bills that were discussed this week. Earlier this year the US Supreme Court upheld California’s foie gras ban, so the legislative path is clear if the city wants to go down it. (amNY)

No one was as vocal a supporter for the death penalty for the Central Park Five than the current president of the United States. If you think he was apologetic when asked about it this week, I would like to sell you the Brooklyn Bridge. (NY Times)

10 walking tours that even New Yorkers will love. A lofty claim, but who wouldn’t be interested a Chinatown food tour, a speakeasy tour of the West Village, or a ghost tour of Greenwich Village? (6sqft)

There’s a new Frank Ape mural in the East Village, part of the 100 Gates Project. (EV Grieve)

10 summer bottomless brunch spots in Astoria. (hint: take the ferry there). (We Heart Astoria)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for April 22, 2019 – The “Welcome To The Three Dollar Ride Era” Edition

Andy Byford might be Andy Bye Bye, New York City goes green, how Brooklyn’s neighborhoods got their names, Girl Scout Troop 6000 sells, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend was rough for getting around via the subway and late nights this week won’t be much different with work on the 1, 2, 3, D, N, R, F, G, and L lines. (Subway Changes)

The city passed a package of bills called the Climate Mobilization Act which acts as a municipal version of a green new deal. Even by signing this into law, no one will want the mayor to run for president. (HuffPost)

RIP the $2.75 subway or bus ride. Welcome to the $3.00 era. (Patch)

The cast of MTV’s “Made in Staten Island” say the show wasn’t canceled, despite only lasting three episodes before being pulled off the air and buried underneath Giants stadium. (amNY)

Andy Byford, president of New York City Transit, might already be on his way out according to his friends. Byford and Cuomo didn’t speak from January through this month. (NY Times)

Broadway will be closed to cars from Union Square to Times Square on Earth Day, April 27. Multiple high traffic areas will be pedestrian-only for the day. (Curbed)

Real all about how Reply All’s PJ Vogt eats on his weekends, here’s your piece. Get ready for a very normal guy doing and eating very normal things. Podcasters, they’re just like us! (Grub Street)

Let’s say you were grazed by a bullet while walking on the street. Would you have the wherewithal to walk yourself to a hospital for treatment? Who has a medal for this 14-year-old girl from Fort Greene? (Pix 11)

The best spots to BYOB. (The Infatuation)

The Cross Bay Bridge, the bridge providing access to the Rockaway Penninsula, will be free (after a refund) for Queens drivers. (QNS)

The L Project officially kicks off this weekend and to help buses move faster, the MTA’s plan is to… remove bus stations from 14th St. (Bedford + Bowery)

1,500 square feet of farm in a Tribeca basement. (Viewing NYC)

Is the tamale going to be the next taco? (Eater)

The Museum of Natural History will move forward with its expansion, essentially defeating the Community United to Protect Theodore Roosevelt Park. The $383 million expansion will be built inside Theodore Roosevelt Park, which was the point of contention. The new center should be completed by 2021. (Curbed)

You know it’s spring when you hear ice cream trucks in the city. This Wednesday’s its a different kind of service that’ll be brought to you. It’s a pop-up court for city-issued summonses in East New York. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Stop blaming the victims is the message from Transportation Alternatives to the NYPD about pedestrians hit by cars, but very well could be applied across the board. (Streetsblog)

If you’ve walked by the Gowanus Yacht Club and thought it was dead, which is a seemingly annual worry, fear not. It will be open in a week or two. (Gothamist)

Need Girl Scout cookies? Troop 6000, the homeless troop, will be selling the at Kellogg’s NYC Cafe in Union Square Monday through Friday from 1-6pm. They have a goal of 60,000 boxes, so you better get buying. (amNY)

Alright Gothamist, this headline is too good. “Netflix, Much Like Your Ex, Is Moving To Bushwick” (Gothamist)

A restraining order was granted against a development that could cast a literal shadow over the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens. The restraining order will be in place pending a hearing on May 3. (Curbed)

Don’t worry, the MTA’s face-scanning technology is only meant to scare you from fare evasion. Don’t you trust the MTA with video footage of your face? (Gizmodo)

The MTA previewed the tap-based OMNY system, the stupidly named replacement for MetroCards. (ABC 7)

Two cute little dogs in a bag on the subway. Nothing more, nothing less. (@bagdogs)

The city is considering demolishing two smaller NYCHA buildings and replacing them with larger buildings in partnership with private developers. 70% would be rented to paying market rates and the rest for public housing residents. (Politico)

Photos from the Easter parade. (amNY)

Is this the smallest museum in the city? It fits inside an elevator shaft. (NY Times)

The City Council voted to bar companies from testing job applicants for marijuana. (The Root)

How each of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods got their names. (Mental Floss)

It’s a perfect storm of rain and poop. More people means more poop. More rain means more sewers needing “overflow,” which is a euphemism for when our sewers are emptied into our waters. City beaches were put on warning 49 times in 2018. Rain is predicted to increase annually through the 2050s. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Swim Guide is an app and site that gives you the current water quality for 7,000 beaches. Just a hint. (The Swim Guide)

The best rooftop bars for cocktails. (amNY)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for March 12, 2019 – The “Half a Chrysler Building of Cocaine” Edition

The MTA claims the subways are moving faster, the rise of vegan diners, James Dolan will ensure no one ever sees the Knicks, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The previous owners of the Chrysler Building lost $650 million in the $150 million sale of the building. Not a bad deal for 1.2 million square feet. (HuffPost)

Rent in Rego Park and Jackson Heights are leading the way in Queens rent increases according to a February 2019 Rental Market Report. (QNS)

If Knicks owner and awful songwriter James Dolan banned everyone who heckled him to sell the team, there would be no one left in MSG. (Gothamist)

The TWA Hotel at JFK will also include artifact and memorabilia exhibitions. A curator for the New York Historical Society is working on the project. (6sqft)

Jake’s Dilemma, an Upper West Side bar, is being review bombed on Yelp for refusing service to someone in a MAGA hat. The MAGA adorned Dion Cini was banned from Disneyland and Disney World after continually unfurling Trump 2020 banners on rides, so you know he’s a real winner. (Eater)

Jake’s Dilemma suspended the hero bartender, despite owner Mitch Banchik admitting the MAGA man was being obnoxious and was given warnings before being asked to leave. (BrooklynVegan)

Federal agencies seized $77 million of cocaine at a port near the city in the largest bust in 25 years. One more bust of that size and they could have bought the Chrysler Building! (Gothamist)

The diner may be on the decline, but there are new standouts looking to evolve the diner concept with vegan alternatives. (Grubstreet)

Meet the women who founded New York City’s modern and contemporary art museums. (6sqft)

The city’s Department of Education is visiting homeless shelters to help families apply for free pre-kindergarten for all 4-year-olds. Families have until March 15 to apply. (Gothamist)

Does a Spider-Man superfan know more about NYC than a local? Let’s skip the entire “What qualifies someone to be a local?” conversation. That’s never helpful. (Gizmodo)

Meet Fauzia Abdur-Rahman, the jerk chicken queen of the Bronx. (Munchies)

Why do New Yorkers walk so fast? The proper answer is that we don’t. You walk too slow. (Gothamist)

The GVSHP submitted a request to landmark the interior of the West Village’s historic White Horse Tavern after the building was purchased by a questionable consortium of developers. (Curbed)

The woman who sprayed multiple people with pepper spray on Friday reportedly claimed she hated white people before spraying them. Tasha Herd was charged with multiple hate-crime felonies and misdemeanors in connection to the attacks. (NY Times)

The city’s school are going meatless on Mondays for the 2019-2020 school year. It’s healthier for students and better for the environment. (amNY)

Aly and Charlie Weisman went out in search of the city’s best bagel and lox. (Food Insider)

The Brooklyn Diocese is demanding an apology from Pete Davidson after comparing the Catholic Church to R. Kelly. Those in glass cathedrals shouldn’t throw stones. (Gothamist)

The MTA says trains are moving faster at 50 stations across the city. Have you noticed the difference? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The smallest pedestrian bridge in Central Park. (Ephemeral New York)

The joys of getting lost. (Atlas Obscura)

The global Time Out Index has revealed that NYC is the best city in the world. Duh. (Time Out)

There have been 182 cases of measles in the city, almost exclusively within the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. (NY Times)

Where to get brunch if you hate brunch. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.