The Briefly for November 26, 2019 – The “Star Wars, But With A Heavy Bronx Accent” Edition

Where to eat at the city’s airports, National Grid ends their gas moratorium, Governor Cuomo accused of targeting the Working Families Party, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Queens DA-elect Melinda Katz named her 31-member transition team. (QNS)

A WELCOME sign has fully replaced the Watchtower sign on the Brooklyn waterfront. (Curbed)

This week is crunch time at the city’s Food Bank. (NY Times)

C-3PO himself, Anthony Daniels, claims that the robot is supposed to have the accent of a “used-car dealer form the Bronx” as originally envisioned by George Lucas. Yikes. (Welcome2TheBronx)

A mural celebrating video game streamer Daniel Desmond “Etika” Amofah was unveiled in Bushwick. Etika took his life in June and in a video before his death had said he was worried the world was going to forget him. (Bushwick Daily)

After the Coast Guard grounded over 20 ferries that service the city for safety problems, Monday morning’s commute was as chaotic as you might imagine for the 32,000 daily ferry commuters. (NY Times)

A new kaleidoscopic art installation, called Ziggy by the firm Hou de Sousa, is open at Flatiron plaza. It’s made from 27,000 feet of rebar and iridescent cord and is a part of the “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer” programming. (6sqft)

Dunkin Donuts is killing its styrofoam cups and Grub Street has a few suggestions with what you can do with all those cups you’ve been hoarding. (Grub Street)

Thanksgiving dinner is not uncommon, unless it’s on the L train. (Jezebel)

In the battle of Governor Cuomo vs National Grid, National Grid blinked and will end their gas moratorium. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With Bloomberg in the presidential race, all varieties of comparisons to Trump become fair game and lo, here is the first from The Real Deal, comparing Trump and Bloomberg’s personal real estate. (The Real Deal)

A look back at Bloomberg’s education record while he was mayor. (Chalkbeat)

Photos: Netflix turned back time in Little Italy over the weekend to promote “The Irishman.” (Gothamist)

Photos: More from Netflix’s “1975” Little Italy. (Grub Street)

The Nets have a new jersey, temporarily dropping the Brooklyn name in favor of Bed-Stuy, accompanied by the colors of the Boogie sweater made popular by the Notorious B.I.G. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Poly Prep Country Day School in Bay Ridge is being sued again for past instances of sexual abuse by a student who claims that the school protected his abuser, a priest and former teacher. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Here’s how the city is planning to handle its “zombie home” problem. (Curbed)

It’s official, Netflix is saving the Paris Theater with a long-term lease on the space. (NY Times)

The MTA is planning to reconstruct the existing Jamaica Bus Depot in 2021 and has no plans to address the parking situation, which has resulted in the storage of city buses on public streets. 18 elected officials in Queens sent a letter to the MTA urging the MTA to make room for indoor parking for buses to cut down on noise and pollution. (QNS)

Curbed’s holiday gift guide for people who love NYC. (Curbed)

Eater’s holiday gift guide for NYC gifts. (Eater)

PureWow’s gifts for New Yorkers that they will love. (PureWow)

For those who don’t want to leave the Upper West Side, here’s a gift guide while staying in the neighborhood. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A list of all of the shipping deadlines to get your mail to wherever it needs to go before Christmas. (Patch)

The MTA is happy to give you the details on its $51.5 billion capital plan, including $3 billion from the city, just as soon as it’s approved and fully funded. (amNewYork)

The mayor signed the bill banning the sale of foie gras into law. The ban goes into effect in 2022. (amNewYork)

Video: Macy’s revealed its holiday windows with this year’s theme “Believe the Wonder” (Viewing NYC)

Voting in New York will be simplified at the expense of third parties. The Public Campaign Financing Commission voted that for political parties to maintain a line on the state ballot, they must either draw 2% or 130,000 in the general election vote for governor or president every two years. The biggest impact this will have is to wipe the Working Families Party off the ballot. Critics point at this as the governor utilizing his power to kill the WFP. (NY Times)

Every year a warning goes out about an algae bloom in the lakes in the city’s parks that is dangerous or fatal to dogs. The combination of the city’s water, water depth, and heat makes for a perfect environment for bloom growth. The Prospect Park Alliance and Brooklyn College are working together on a potential solution. (Gothamist)

Where to eat at Newark Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and JFK Airport.

Thanks to Henry T. Casey for today’s featured image

The Briefly for November 14, 2019 – The “Problem Goes Deeper Than Policing Churros” Edition

Virginity tests, the NYPD’s illegal child fingerprint database was destroyed, the food at Wegmans gets reviewed, OMNY expands, pie shops, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The punishment for killing a woman with a car? $750 and a suspended license. (Streetsblog)

“I am calling on the governor to immediately remove these additional officers from the MTA and put that money into actually improving the system. The governor cannot expect the public to pay the fare when the State is refusing to hold up its own financial responsibility.” – City Council Member Antonio Reynoso of Brooklyn (Streetsblog)

Will the 500 new police officers on buses and in subway stations prevent 33 million evaded fares a year for ten years? That figure, of course, doesn’t include any lawsuits that spawn from arrests made by those officers. That’s the monetary argument, but if the surge of officers is about fare evasion and protecting MTA workers, why are the headlines about churro ladies and teenagers selling candy? It’s about the kind of city we want to be. (Second Ave Sagas)

A look at the new Tompkins Square Playground’s equipment for kids with special needs. (EV Grieve)

The City Council voted to give themselves a $36,000 raise, but haven’t been nearly as generous with their staff, who make $47,784 annually on average. There has been conversations about unionization to improve salaries. (Politico)

A vegetarian restaurant that only serves one item, but is it any good? Yes is the answer. (Gothamist)

The city owns most of the land in the amusement area of Coney Island, but Central Amusement International (owners of Luna Park) operates the lease on the boardwalk shops. In addition to rent, they take 10% of their overall sales. In recent years they’ve been favoring their own games, shops, and food options over mom and pop shops. This is a private business deciding on the future of businesses who are on land owned by the city. Lola Star, the woman behind the boardwalk shop and roller discos across Brooklyn is stepping up and resurrecting the advocacy group Save Coney Island. (Coney Island Blog)

Every rental building in Manhattan ranked by price. (StreetEasy)

The Charging Bull isn’t moving… yet. Despite the mayor talking big in public about how it has to be moved due to Bowling Green being an unsafe place for that high number of visitors it receives, a location to move it to was never decided on. For now, the bull remains. (Gothamist)

The Coalition for Affordable Homes is introducing a proposal for a Small Home Anti-Speculation Tax that would impose a 15-20% tax on property transferred to a new owner within two years of ownership. While they may not prevent flipping houses, it would reinvest in affordable housing in the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

After 24,200 calls to 911 since June using a burner cellphone, Yogit Persaud was arrested. Each time she would call, the police or FDNY or both would have to respond to the claim, regardless if they knew it was from her and it was a false report. Persaud purports the NYPD has conspired against her. She was arrested for making a false emergency report, obstructing governmental administration, and aggravated harassment. (Gothamist)

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio, leader of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and current investigator of sexual abuse the Buffalo diocese, sexually assaulted an 11-year-old altar boy when he was a priest in New Jersey in the 70s, according to a new lawsuit. (NY Times)

Billionaire Barry Diller’s public park island off Pier 55 has a new name and it’s “Little Island.” A modest name considering the price tag ballooned from $35 million to $250 million. (Gothamist)

Junior’s Law, named for Lesandro “Junior” Guzman-Feliz, is a bill that will reimburse small businesses owners the cost of a panic button, which could have saved the teenager’s life. The bill has 31 supporters in the City Council. (amNewYork)

Greenwich Village Chelsea Chamber of Commerce wants you to remember that there are still stores that are open left on Bleecker Street to shop at and has declared November 23 “Shop Bleecker Day,” where participating shops will provide deals and discounts. (amNewYork)

Virginity tests are still a thing in the year 2019. A bill was introduced to ban them in New York. This is, of course, coming into headlines now because T.I. admitted in an interview that he forces his 18-year-old daughter to undergo hymen checks annually, which is awful. (Gothamist)

While Staten Island is still a part of New York City (you can read about that in yesterday’s edition of The Briefly), it has a new dockless bike program. Beryl will operate 1,000 bikes across the island starting in the spring. (Streetsblog)

Take a look inside (renderings of) Disney’s upcoming Hudson Square HQ. (amNewYork)

The governor gave National Grid two weeks to hook up new customers of he will revoke their franchise to supply gas to New York City. (Gothamist)

The NYPD’s illegal database of children’s fingerprints was confirmed to be destroyed after a years-long investigation into it by the Legal Aid Society. (Patch)

“Wegmans is not good enough to be your destination food court.” Eater reviews the food at Wegmans. (Eater)

OMNY is hitting more subway stations next month, including Penn Station. (6sqft)

A guide to OMNY. (Curbed)

The city fines landlords for lead, but rarely ever collects. Even the highest estimates put the figure at 10%. (Gothamist)

The new age for tobacco or e-cigarette purchases is now 21 years old. (amNewYork)

Seven ways to fix your overheated apartment. Yes, “open the windows” is number one. (StreetEasy)

14 spectacular pie shops. (Eater)

Thanks to Meg Blatt for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for November 13, 2019 – The “Staten Island Revisits Secession from New York City” Edition

The city’s first hair discrimination case is settled, Penn Station is about to get worse, a 22.5-foot arm appears in Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Queens has a new Boulevard of Death, and it’s Jewel Ave. (Streetsblog)

The first hair discrimination case in the city has been resolved. Sally Hershberger and partner Sharon Dorram lost a $70k lawsuit after former workers were told that their hairstyles didn’t fit a dress code, specifically that “afros and box-braid hairstyles did not reflect the upscale image of the neighborhood.” (The Root)

Staten Island wants to secede from NYC. (Gothamist)

Penn Station’s multi-year renovation means that the already depressing station will become even more dour when it loses about 17 businesses including Shake Shack, Magnolia Bakery, two Starbucks, a Pretty and Godiva. (Eater)

Can an opinion be wrong? In the case of the “Can We Talk About Womanspreading?” opinion piece that ran in the Daily News, the answer is yes. Claire Lampen read it, so you don’t have to. (Gothamist)

Last night’s sunset was spectacular. (@mikiodo)

What’s the point of adding 500 cops to the subways to police fare evasion? Rationally minded folks aren’t the only ones asking that question, the MTA’s board is also starting to ask that same question. (Gothamist)

More cops of better service? The number of crimes on the subway are down, no matter what fantasy Governor Cuomo wants to create to justify spending more than half a billion dollars on new subway cops. The governor if you ask 100 people on the subway if they want more cops on the subways, 75 would say yes, so amNewYork went down and started asking. (amNewYork)

Dr. Sun Yat-sen received a monument in Chinatown at Columbus Park, adding Dr Sun’s name to the park’s plaza as well. He was a pioneer in the reform of China in 1911 and the monument has “All Under Heaven Are Equal” inscribed on the pedestal. (amNewYork)

This week is the best week for forest bathing. What’s forest bathing? I don’t really know. It’s kind of like taking a walk in the trees but different? (Gothamist)

The East Side Costal Resiliency (ESCR) project is headed for a full City Council vote on Thursday, which will decide the future of the East River Park and how the Lower East Side is protected from storms and the rising sea. (Curbed)

There are 40 NYCHA developments without gas, some without gas since April. City Comptroller Scott Stringer argues that if gas is not supplied for an extended period of time that the NYCHA should be offering food reimbursement and monthly bill abatements to compensate. (amNewYork)

Is the one minute you can spend inside the “Infinity Mirrored Room” at David Zwirner in Chelsea worth the potentially very long wait? (NY Times)

Looking for restaurants serving Thanksgiving dinner this year? (Patch)

How to choose an apartment based on the school district. (StreetEasy)

With the help of Lin-Manuel Miranda and some Hamilton collaborators, the Drama Book Shop will be opening its new location on W 39th in the spring and operated by the company that operates Hamilton’s gift shop. (NY Times)

Third Ave in Sunset Park between 20th and 30th Streets underneath the Gowanus Expressway is becoming a hub for RV parking. (amNewYork)

A rezoning in Woodside was given the thumbs up by Community Board 2 that will bring 60 apartments to 52nd St near Queens Blvd with parking, a community facility, and commercial space. (Sunnyside Post)

Last weekend saw a spike in hate crimes reported in Brooklyn, most anti-Semitic in nature. (amNewYork)

The National Grid / Governor Cuomo war of words hasn’t ended. The governor once again raised the threat of revoking National Grid’s license to operate in the southern part of the state. (NY Times)

Someone broke into the conductor cab on a 1 train and bean screaming “I have a fucking gun!” into the train’s PA system. Chaos ensued, as you might expect, but no one was found with a gun and no injuries were reported. (Gothamist)

RIP Charlie Gordon. Astoria’s Sandwich King, who established Sal, Kris & Charlie’s Deli in Astoria. (LIC Post)

Unity is a 22.5-foot bronze sculpture of an arm pointing towards the sky in Downtown Brooklyn by Hank Willis Thomas. The piece is “in homage to, and celebration of, the unique and multifaceted character of the borough of Brooklyn. There is one finger raised, but it’s not the Brooklyn salute you might assume. It’s the index finger. (Untapped New York)

Hall & Oates is hitting the road and MSG is on their list for February 28. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Single-Story Project,” from Adam Friedberg on view at the Center for Architecture captures 100 one-story buildings in the East Village and Lower East Side. It seems almost impossible that with the city as dense as it is that there are that many one-story buildings remaining. (Curbed)

Take a look inside Norah Jones’ $8 million circa-1843 Cobble Hill home, which includes a master suite terrace and a hot tub and pool in the backyard. (Curbed)

Are your neighbors’ security cameras spying on you? (NY Times)

The hottest restaurants in Queens this month. (Eater)