The Briefly for May 27, 2020 – The “The Last Region Under PAUSE” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city caps Seamless fees for restaurants, a $1,000 to fill out the census, Uber and Lyft drivers sue for unemployment, Central Park Karen, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 70˚
Overcast throughout the day.

Queens has a new Cold Case Unit under DA Melinda Katz, dedicated to solving the borough’s oldest and unsolved homicide cases. There are currently about 2,200 unsolved homicides in Queens. (Queens County Politics)

“I”m going to tell them there’s an African-American man threatening my life.” The story of the Central Park Karen, Amy Cooper, whose week started with a threatening to use the NYPD as a weapon, and two days later she was fired for her job and surrendered her dog. (Zack Linly for The Root)

It’s no surprise, but today it’s a reality. New York City is the only region of the state still under the PAUSE order by Governor Cuomo. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Have you filled out the census yet? Only 50% of the city has and we’re lagging 10% behind the rest of the country. In an effort to bump up the numbers, NYC Census 2020 is giving away $1,000 Seamless gift cards. More than a gift card, I’m sure you’re seeing photos and videos from around the country of idiots getting together without masks. These are the people who will have more representation and funding in and from the government because they filled out their census this year. These yahoos are gonna fly to NYC from whatever podunk, backwater town they live in, and infect more New Yorkers while they go out for SantaCon or take photos with the Naked Cowboy or puke on the floor of a bathroom in the East Village or walk extremely slowly on the sidewalk right in front of you. These are the people that can fill in their census and yet we can’t seem to get our shit together and need gift cards to Seamless as an incentive. Rant over. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Want to bring a smile to someone? Send some letters to some older Upper West Siders. (Claude Benjamin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Uber and Lyft drivers are suing the state for timely payment of unemployment benefits. Currently, drivers have to wait months to receive standard unemployment benefits, unlike the standard two to three weeks like most workers. (Noam Scheiber for NY Times)

Video: Watch former New Yorkers try L.A. bagels. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The city has hired more than 1,700 contact tracers to get the city closer to the metrics necessary to start its reopening. (NY1)

How good of a salesman is Governor Cuomo? We’re about to find out, as the governor heads to Washington to convince President Trump to fund the extension of the Second Ave subway, the new Penn Station, and a train to LaGuardia. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A quick look at the 80-year history of the Copacabana. (Maria Sherman for Jezebel)

The Obie Awards, honoring Off and Off Off Broadway theater, is going virtual. You can catch the Obie Awards on YouTube on June 4, hosted by Cole Escola. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Alt-side parking is suspended through June 7. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

What if no one wants to save New York’s restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

ConEd is trying to raise rates this summer and the City Council is having none of it. ConEd is warning that demand may exceed last summer where brown and blackouts plagued portions of the city. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: A pre/post Covid-19 comparison walk around Midtown. (ActionKid)

Seventeen of the city’s 20 hate crimes against Asians in 2020 have been coronavirus related. 20 may not seem like much, but compare that to 2019’s hate crimes against Asians at 3. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The mayor signed a package of bills into laws intended to protect small businesses by imposing limits on third-party food delivery services, extending the suspension of sidewalk cafe fee collection, and protecting commercial tenants from harassment and personal liability. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Would you go to a concert if it meant having to wear this weird neon spacesuit? How do you drink or go to the bathroom if you’re sealed inside a spacesuit at a show? (Erin Christie for BrooklynVegan)

Video: New York’s “Wear A MAsk” PSA contest has a winner. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The New York Stock Exchange partially opened on Tuesday and is prohibiting employees and visitors from taking mass transit, something extremely impractical to use as an example for other businesses. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Nets opened its training facility in Sunset Park to players for voluntary workouts with a limit of four players in the facility at a time. (JT Torenli for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Restrictions on third-party delivery companies like Seamless or Uber Eats caps fees at 15 percent per order for delivery and 5 percent per order for any other charge while the city is under emergency and for 90 days beyond. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Actors’ Equity Association barred its 51,000 members from in-person auditions, rehearsals, and performances and says they will not lift that restriction until there is fast, reliable testing for the novel coronavirus and widespread contact tracing. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

A breakdown of the costs of what’s recommended before you move to NYC. (Localize.City)

Why hasn’t Mayor de Blasio visited Rikers Island at all during his second term? (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Recreating recipes from restaurants is a long-standing tradition which has seen a revival under stay-at-home orders. Are we chasing the recipe and a meal or are we chasing a feeling and trying to rekindle memories? (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Video: Recreating New York’s best pancakes from Clinton St Baking Company. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Thanks to reader Alexa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 18, 2020 – The “Mom and Dad Are Fighting Over Quarantine” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber Pools are banned, NY ramps up COVID-19 testing, the Night Mayor makes a request, price gouging becomes illegal, Whole Foods needs bikers, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 53˚
Rain overnight.

Today’s free stream from the Met Opera is Puccini’s La Bohème. Be patient, as their website is being inundated with people wanting to watch.

Ridgewood’s Nowawadays is streaming every night at 8pm.

Caveat’s free programming tonight is Nerd Nite.

Governor Cuomo is the guest on today’s edition of The Daily podcast from the Times. (Michael Barbaro, produced by Austin Mitchell, Adizah Eghan and Lynsea Garrison for NY Times)

The late-night shows are off TV, but they’re not off YouTube. Colbert gave a monologue from the bathtub while wearing a suit, of course. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

We all knew this would happen. The governor and mayor had been showing a unified front against the pandemic for almost a week, which is too long for their often strained relationship. Mayor de Blasio made waves by claiming that a shelter-in-place order might be coming in the next two days, but Governor Cuomo made certain to publicly state he’s the only person that can make that order and has no plans to quarantine any city. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio was so intent on keeping city libraries open during the coronavirus outbreak that he went as far as making veiled threats about cutting their funding if they closed. What a leader. (Sally Goldenberg and Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

“Our schools are important, he said. Here’s what we heard: Our lives are not.” -An editorial from Emily James, an NYC teacher looking at the last few weeks. (Emily James for HuffPost)

How to get around NYC safely during the coronavirus pandemic. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Uber, Via and Lyft pool rides in NYC are banned. The only people who should be getting into cars together are “real couples,” according to the mayor. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

What about Access-a-Ride? The MTA has made no such ruling, despite Access-a-Ride customers being among the city’s most vulnerable. The MTA is “working on it.” (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

Ridership is down 60% on the subways and 90% on commuter trains and the MTA is seeking a $4 billion federal bailout. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

This is how we know it’s a true problem: Alternate side of the street parking has been suspended. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Here’s how takeout alcohol sales work. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

$100 a tray for Japanese Hokkaido uni. Omakase boxes starting at $50. Can luxury restaurants go takeout? (Erika Adams for Eater)

What is a restaurant? Is the corner store that mostly serves pupusas a restaurant? A close-up with Mirna’s Pupuseria in Flatbush as they face their future in our new reality. (Ligaya Mishan for NY Times)

Is it possible to govern while socially distanced? We’re getting closer and closer to the due date for the state’s budget on April 1 and assemblymembers are being told to keep their distance. (Fred Mogul and Karen De Witt for Gothamist)

It’s like August in March. The 1% are heading to the Hamptons and spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to rent houses. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

There have been a lot of comparisons to the 1918 Spanish Flu when talking about COVID-19, especially when saying that it became dormant in the summer and came back like the evil in the fall. How did NYC survive the 1918 Spanish Flu? (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn DA will not prosecute low-level offenders to reduce the number of people exposed to COVID-19. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A walk down a mostly empty Broadway in Astoria. (ActionKid)

It is illegal for any store to raise the price for any product or service that could limit the spread of coronavirus by 10% or more. We can thank the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection for the new rule to prevent price gouging. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If you can ride a bike in the city, there may be a job for you. Whole Foods is looking for cyclists to deliver groceries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

By Thursday, the city’s capacity for COVID-19 testing will be up to 5,000 tests a day. That doesn’t mean that anyone who wants a test will get one, but it means that people who should have been tested already will finally be tested and we can move forward from there. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re working from home and the apartment feels lonely, please remember that you can still foster a dog or cat. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Four players for the Nets have tested positive for COVID-19, including Kevin Durant. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

Bandcamp is waiving their cut of sales to show support for artists. If you’ve got a favorite band and want to show some support, go buy some mp3s. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Comic book readers: Call your local shop to see if they are accommodating curbside pickup for your new books this week. (George Gene Gustines for NY Times)

Photos: You know who doesn’t care about the coronavirus? Christo and Amelia, the Tompkins Square hawks. (Laura Goggin Photography)

Some people won’t ever listen, even if it means putting their entire community’s lives at risk. The FDNY broke up a Hasidic wedding in Williamsburg on Tuesday after more than 200 people were in attendance. In the same building, a school was in session. The Times goes out of its way to state that these kinds of events are influenced by the teaching of “extremist leaders” and do not represent the Hasidic community. (Liam Stack and Nate Schweber for NY Times)

Headline: “Brooklyn Ultra-Orthodox Community Faces Spike In Coronavirus Infections, Urgent Care Center Confirms” 🤔 (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Office of Nightlife is gathering information on the impacts for workers, performers, contractors, and businesses from COVID-19-related business closures and event cancellations. Please fill out the survey. (Nightlife Mayor Ariel Palitz)

The Bowery Ballroom and Mercury Lounge have put together a GoFundMe for their 100 staff members. (GoFundMe)

Philippe G. Massoud, chef-owner of ilili and ilili Box has a GoFundMe to provide dry and canned foods, diapers and other necessities to his 130 staff and families. I’m not sure how I’m going to keep covering these GoFundMe efforts. There are hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who need help right now. (GoFundMe)

If you’re connected to a bartender or server or restaurant on social media, no doubt you’ve seen the requests for tips or support in whatever way is possible. The federal government has created out of thin air an additional $3 trillion-plus to flush into the economy. Where the hell is the help for the service industry? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Friday’s looking to be a 70-degree day. Here are the 12 largest parks in the city so you can go outside but keep your distance. (Untapped New York)

Brief hits:
RIP Carolyn Egger, killed by a driver over the weekend in Jackson Heights. The driver was not charged. (Streetsblog) | A virtual tour of the Brooklyn Museum’s ‘Studio 54: Night Magic’. (Brooklyn Based) | The fight over the Atlantic Yards is not over. (The Real Deal) | A time-lapse video of the once-in-a-decade Agave titanota’s bloom, at the New York Botanical Garden. (Viewing NYC) | The gym ban applies to the gym in your residential building. (The Real Deal) | How to digitally borrow books from the NYPL. (Time Out) | Yes, my band does have a Bandcamp page, thanks for asking. (Bad Bloom)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for September 27, 2019 – The “MTA Buses Will Vaporize You Car with Lasers” Weekend Edition

The City Council looks to silence nighttime construction, Juumane Williams leapfrogs the mayor, no one believes in the MTA Capital Plan, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Check this weekend’s subway disruptions before you head out this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

Construction noise keeping you up at night? You’re not alone, and the City Council is looking into limiting construction work because the Department of Buildings’ approvals doesn’t seem to be taking neighborhoods into consideration. As you could imagine, the real estate lobby isn’t thrilled with this using the “it’s necessary for a growing city,” but last I checked the city is contracting, not expanding. (NY Times)

Have you seen the ads showing the MTA’s new bus lane enforcement that seemingly installs a car-destroying laser aboard every bus? (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to deal with 911 calls that deal with emotionally disturbed individuals was supposed to be announced on Wednesday, but the day came and went with no announcement. Public Advocate Jumaane Williams isn’t waiting for the mayor and released his own plan on Thursday. (The City)

The Port Authority will raise tolls, AirTrain ticket prices, and fees for being picked up at the airports by taxis or for-hire vehicles like Ubers or Lyfts. (Curbed)

Tshombe Selby went from usher to performer at the Met Opera for the current production of Porgy and Bess. (amNY)

The city neglected to inspect nearly 10,000 buildings for lead that housed nearly 12,000 children with blood lead levels above the federal standard. Over 2,700 of those cases came after the city was aware of other cases in the same building. An investigation from City Comptroller Scott Stringer revealed a breakdown in the city’s bureaucracy that allowed these conditions to exist and for landlords to get away with these violations. (amNY)

The 25 essential places to drink wine in NYC. (Eater)

A look at Inwood, what the Times calls “Manhattan’s last affordable neighborhood,” which will last as long as people like the Times doesn’t write about it being affordable. (NY Times)

The mystery of the 8’x7′ oil painting hanging in Cortland Alley has been solved, its artist is Diana Wege and the painting is a part of her Earth Requiem series. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city’s Commission on Human Rights released new legal guidance which offers some of the strongest protections against discrimination based on immigration status and national origin in housing, the workplace, and in places like stores, restaurants, schools, and gyms. Telling someone to “speak English” or “go back to your country” in any of these settings would violate the guidance and comes with a fine for up to $250,000. (Patch)

The city’s most exciting new burgers. (Grub Street)

Photos: Inside the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one month before its chapter as Brooklyn’s next destination. (Curbed)

The Nets unveiled a new court to play on, “inspired by Brooklyn.” (6sqft)

The MTA Capital Plan was approved by the MTA’s board unanimously, but no one seems confident that the plan that was voted on is the plan that will be enacted. (Gothamist)

Evon Stephens was sentenced to five years in prison for starting the 2018 fire in the Kings Plaza Shopping Center garage that injured 25 and damaged 135 vehicles. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A Wagner College professor on Staten Island told one of his classes that he wanted to shoot the students in another one of his classes in the head and he was “locked and loaded.” He’s also suspended and under investigation. (Gothamist)

The Queensboro Bridge bike lane and pedestrian situation is more evidence the mayor’s Vision Zero plans don’t have teeth. (Streetsblog)

This story of a feud between two neighbors that has it all. Mannequins, spy cameras, defamation, and a ten million dollar lawsuit. (Gothamist)

Milkshake squirrel, Lollipop Raccoon, etc. A ranking of all of the “move over, Pizza Rat” stories. (Gothamist)

One of the hardest questions to answer. “Where should you go to eat in New York?” The Times attempts to tackle it. (NY Times)

A new damning report from the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General shows the Metropolitan Detention Center’s heat outage last winter in the coldest week of the year was caused by mismanagement and not fire and lists out all of the ways different ways issues were failed to be addressed. (Gothamist)

The world’s oldest barber, Anthony Mancinelli, is dead at 108. (NY Times)

Dr. Glenn Payne, a fake neuropsychologist, swindled at least $30,000 out of patients. Dr. Payne was the best he could come up with? (Gothamist)

15 best dumpling spots in the city. (Gothamist)