The Briefly for February 11, 2020 – The “Brokers’ Fees Are Unbanned” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The subway mascot Cardvaark, the hottest restaurants in Queens, a sleepover at IKEA, the plastic bag ban, an Oreo slide, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.

Congrats to the Barclays Center subway stop, which has the city’s worst privately owned subway elevator functioning for only 74.2% of 2019, out of service for a total of three months of the year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Video: Go behind the scenes and back in time with this Metropolitan Museum of Art behind the scenes tour from 1928. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Remember when brokers’ fees were banned? Brokers’ fees have been unbanned, temporarily at least. The Real Estate Board of New York sued the state and the judge put a temporary restraining order on the rule. Snip snap. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hulu is taking over Rough Trade this weekend in an installation to promote the new Hulu version of High Fidelity. (Grant Lancaster for amNewyork Metro)

New York is the ninth most dangerous state for online dating, which takes into account internet crime rates and STI transmission rates. The safest site for online dating is Maine and the most dangerous is Alaska, which has the country’s highest man to woman ratio. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best bars on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

Aldea, which arrives a Michelin star, is closing on February 22. Chef George Mendes cites plans to “take a break, recharge creatively, and refocus,” with no other reason given for the closure. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Pizza Rat won Gothamist’s poll for the new subway mascot, but let’s not forget the subway’s previous mascot, Cardvaark, who looks like everyone’s least coolest cousin wearing a homemade Halloween outfit, who was supposed to help us all transition from tokens to MetroCards. Fun fact, the same person who brought us Cardvaark also brought us Poetry in Motion. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Okay, so you’re moving from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Here are 19 answers to common questions. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

The NYPD is reporting 2019 saw the first rise in the number of Stop and Frisks since 2013, up 22% from 2018. An NYPD spokesperson, who must think that we’re all stupid, said that it’s “unlikely to be a true increase in stops but rather more accurate and complete reporting.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

With a history of racist and victim-blaming comments, does the Sergeants Benevolent Association’s Ed Mullins really speak for the actual NYPD? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

Take a deep breath in and release that tension in your body. The Yankees have reported for spring training, which means actual spring is coming. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Everything you need to know about NYC’s citywide ferry. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban, which kicks into gear in less than three weeks. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Manhattan’s community boards are older than the borough’s population, homeowners hold a disproportionately high number of seats and Hispanic people are underrepresented. Not a great representation. (Rachel Holliday Smith and Ann Choi for The City)

Oreo is building a giant inflatable slide in Herald Square that will open February 21st, so when you’re in Herald Square and your friends see the slide and ask what it is, you can look effortlessly cool by telling them “Oreo put it up.” (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted to sleep in the Red Hook IKEA, here’s your chance. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

After an ICE agent shot Eric Diaz in the face, it’s time to ask if New York City really a sanctuary city? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

The Reckless Driver Accountability Act will require drivers who rack up five red light tickets or 15 school speed zone violations within a one year period to take a safe driving course or they’ll lose their car until they do. The bill is expected to pass City Council this week. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Cupid’s Undie Run, kind of like a street version of the No Pants Subway Ride but for charity, hit the streets last weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Video: ‘Commute’ by Scott Lazer is a beautiful film, shot on 16mm, even if it’s focused on Penn Station in rush hour. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

1 Dot = 1 Person. Explore how racially divided the city is using 2010 census data. (Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service)

Feds to the Hudson River rail tunnel: Drop Dead. (Ryan Hutchins for Politico)

Another day, another water main break. This time the water main on South Street near Pike Slio broke, flooding the area. (Bowery Boogie)

R40, La Rotisserie du Coin, La Mian Lounge join the hottest restaurants in Queens.

Featured photo sent in from reader @mfireup

The Briefly for April 17, 2019 – The “L Project Will Take Train Service From Suck to Blow” Edition

Amazon passed over Industry City before leaving Long Island City, the best bars in Nolita and Soho, Rosé Mansion returns this summer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Long before Amazon decided not to build a headquarters in Long Island City, they decided not to build at Industry City. The details came out thanks to a Freedom of Information Law request and shows just how far the developers were willing to go to become Amazon City ahead of their billion dollar rezoning request. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about what’s open and what’s closed on Good Friday, Passover and Easter across the city. (Patch)

Here is the subway map and schedule for the L Project, which starts on April 26 and will take the trains service from suck to blow for the foreseeable future. (Gothamist)

Congratulations to the Bed-Stuy chess team for winning second place in the All-Girls National Chess Championship in Chicago last weekend. (Patch)

Squibb Bridge, the pedestrian bridge connecting Brooklyn Bridge Park and Brooklyn Heights will be demolished and rebuilt after opening in only 2013. The BQE Rehab won’t interfere with the bridge, meaning work can get started faster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If Skynet ever becomes a reality, you can rest assured that the city’s government won’t play a hand in its creation. The mayor’s artificial intelligence task force has met 20 times in the last year and has accomplished, as far as reporting has shown, absolutely nothing but infighting and typical government inefficiencies. Like many of the mayor’s projects, there was no explicitly stated goals or scope to the work they are expected to achieve. (Curbed)

Close your eyes and picture a variety show in Bushwick. Good. Now turn up the saturation and volume past the point of being polite. If you’ve got a wild enough imagination, you’ve pictured something close to Eric Schmalenberger’s Blunderland Variety Show in its seventh year. (Bushwick Daily)

Hold on to your Instagram accounts, Rosé Mansion is returning this summer. (amNY)

In “nowhere is safe” news, the Fifth Avenue Apple Store has had a supposed month-long bed bug infestation. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s revamped plans for a completely new system of bus routes is still coming, but much like a city bus, it’s going to arrive later than you want it to. NYC Transit plans to finalize a plan by April 2020. (QNS)

The Lyrid meteor shower will hit its peak on April 22 and 23 and will happen from the 16th to 25th. Take a look upwards at night, you may see some shooting stars. (Patch)

New Jersey politicians think congestion pricing unfairly targets New Jerseyians. Maybe they’ve forgotten the point of congestion pricing is first and foremost to reduce the number of cars driving into Manhattan. (NY Times)

Buckets Of Xanax, no really we’re talking about literal hundreds of thousands of pills in buckets, were seized in a dark web raid that was using Manhattan businesses as return addresses. (Patch)

SPIN’s new ping pong lounge launches next week. The ping pong is free, but how’s the food? (Time Out)

The mayor, unlike some other politicians, has already released his 2018 taxes. Nothing terribly exciting, but he gets credit for doing it. (Politico)

Jumaane Williams, who is both the city’s public advocate and also captain obvious, said that the Hudson Yards is “not for a majority of this city.” (amNY)

The state’s legislature is pushing forward with a bill that would ban religious exemptions for the measles-vaccine for any child attending schools in New York state. Rockland County’s outbreak has infected 186 and Brooklyn’s has infected 259. The World Health Organization labeled measles as one of the 10 largest threats to global health in 2019. (Downtown Express)

An interview with Dr. Jan Kaminsky, Director of Education at Rainbow Health Consulting, and is also developing a National LGBTQ+ Nurses Association. (Gothamist)

The best bars in Soho and Nolita. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 12, 2019 – The “Sometimes You Need To Look at Photos of Dogs” Edition

Congestion pricing and legal recreational marijuana get real, the mayor won’t act on parking placard abuse, but the City Council will, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you haven’t gone outside yet, today’s weather is going to be miserable. (Patch)

Take a look inside Seth Meyers’ apartment. (Curbed)

The story behind the Harriet Tubman Memorial “Swing Low” on 122nd Street. (6sqft)

Photos from The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. You know you can’t resist. (Gothamist)

It’s 0.0000797113 of an acre on the corner of Seventh Ave and Christopher Street and if you don’t look down at the right moment you’ll miss a significant piece of defiant private property that defines the spirit of the Village. (NY Times)

There is a 2017 city law that dictates that all entrances used by pedestrians must have visible numbers. Over 53% of buildings on 42nd Street are missing numbers. City Councilmember Jumaane Williams introduced the law and is tired of selective enforcement. (amNY)

The five oldest buildings in Manhattan. (Untapped Cities)

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s public school report that addresses segregation in education is released. Now that his crutch of talking about how the report is coming has been removed, the mayor has to actually do something, which is not his strong suit. (NY Times)

New York will likely lose a seat in the House of Representatives in 2020, and New York Democrats could redraw Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’ district to remove her from Congress. If AOC is asked to leave with such a large national profile, she could target Chuck Schumer’s senate seat in 2022. (The Intercept)

Getting a tattoo in a subway car? Unless you love staph infections, it’s not a great idea. Maybe that’s why TuffCity Tattoo created a replica car. (Untapped Cities)

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the New York Public Library has released an interactive map of fictional love in the city. (6sqft)

CatVideoFest is shockingly not happening in Williamsburg or Bushwick. (Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo’s transportation deputy unveiled their latest proposal for congestion pricing. Implementation would go into effect in 2021 and any vehicle going into the “central business district” in Manhattan would be charged roughly $11.52, no matter where you enter. There will be no business exemption and the funds will be put into a “lockbox” for the MTA. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

McNally Jackson is staying in SoHo. They’re not moving, but they’re opening two new stores in City Point in Brooklyn and the South Street Seaport. (The Real Deal)

Upstate says they’ll take Amazon HQ2 if we don’t want it. Maybe the Syracuse-Rochester corridor forgets that Amazon has to want to be there. (NY Post)

“We have reminded the folks there that we are still here” New Jersey also would take HQ2, but Governor Phil Murphy said it in the saddest way possible. (NY Post)

Ruben Diaz Sr, noted homophobe and city council member, says that he is the victim in this story. (Patch)

Curbed is hiring a full-time, junior-level reporter. (Curbed)

Kings Plaza Shopping Center, the site of the large fire that injured over 20 people in September of last year, continues to receive fines for illegally storing cars. Their latest fine could be $25,000, their second in the last six months. (Brooklyn Paper)

You haven’t missed the news. The jury in the El Chapo trial are still deliberating. (NY Post)

Here are the city’s 20 most dangerous one-lane intersections for pedestrians and cyclists. (Localize.city)

The L train mystery odor is one week old and it has two new siblings. Joining the party is a thick fog and the smell of rubbing alcohol. The smell appears to be permeating the subways into nearby apartments. (Gothamist)

The City Council unveiled multiple bills that would mandate proactive enforcement and increase oversight of parking placard abuse. One bill would ban city vehicles from blocking crosswalks, fire hydrants, sidewalks, bike lanes and bus lanes unless there is an emergency. It’s maddening that this is currently legal. (Patch)

According to the state budget: Recreational marijuana will come with three taxes. $1 per dry weight gram of flower and $0.25 per gram of trim, 20% sales tax and a 2% local sales tax. You would be able to grow and process up to six plants on private property, using it would be illegal except for private property and can’t take it across state lines. (amNY)

A gym teacher in Brooklyn was fired for playing Fortnite with his students. (NY Post)

HUD administrator Lynne Patton’s stunt of living in different NYCHA buildings for the next four weeks has already been proven to be a farce. (NY Post)

The mayor is so sure that he’s such done a great job that he’s headed to New Hampshire to continue flirting with running for president. (NY Post)

Where to eat near Grand Central.

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