The Briefly for April 17, 2019 – The “L Project Will Take Train Service From Suck to Blow” Edition

Amazon passed over Industry City before leaving Long Island City, the best bars in Nolita and Soho, Rosé Mansion returns this summer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Long before Amazon decided not to build a headquarters in Long Island City, they decided not to build at Industry City. The details came out thanks to a Freedom of Information Law request and shows just how far the developers were willing to go to become Amazon City ahead of their billion dollar rezoning request. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about what’s open and what’s closed on Good Friday, Passover and Easter across the city. (Patch)

Here is the subway map and schedule for the L Project, which starts on April 26 and will take the trains service from suck to blow for the foreseeable future. (Gothamist)

Congratulations to the Bed-Stuy chess team for winning second place in the All-Girls National Chess Championship in Chicago last weekend. (Patch)

Squibb Bridge, the pedestrian bridge connecting Brooklyn Bridge Park and Brooklyn Heights will be demolished and rebuilt after opening in only 2013. The BQE Rehab won’t interfere with the bridge, meaning work can get started faster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If Skynet ever becomes a reality, you can rest assured that the city’s government won’t play a hand in its creation. The mayor’s artificial intelligence task force has met 20 times in the last year and has accomplished, as far as reporting has shown, absolutely nothing but infighting and typical government inefficiencies. Like many of the mayor’s projects, there was no explicitly stated goals or scope to the work they are expected to achieve. (Curbed)

Close your eyes and picture a variety show in Bushwick. Good. Now turn up the saturation and volume past the point of being polite. If you’ve got a wild enough imagination, you’ve pictured something close to Eric Schmalenberger’s Blunderland Variety Show in its seventh year. (Bushwick Daily)

Hold on to your Instagram accounts, Rosé Mansion is returning this summer. (amNY)

In “nowhere is safe” news, the Fifth Avenue Apple Store has had a supposed month-long bed bug infestation. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s revamped plans for a completely new system of bus routes is still coming, but much like a city bus, it’s going to arrive later than you want it to. NYC Transit plans to finalize a plan by April 2020. (QNS)

The Lyrid meteor shower will hit its peak on April 22 and 23 and will happen from the 16th to 25th. Take a look upwards at night, you may see some shooting stars. (Patch)

New Jersey politicians think congestion pricing unfairly targets New Jerseyians. Maybe they’ve forgotten the point of congestion pricing is first and foremost to reduce the number of cars driving into Manhattan. (NY Times)

Buckets Of Xanax, no really we’re talking about literal hundreds of thousands of pills in buckets, were seized in a dark web raid that was using Manhattan businesses as return addresses. (Patch)

SPIN’s new ping pong lounge launches next week. The ping pong is free, but how’s the food? (Time Out)

The mayor, unlike some other politicians, has already released his 2018 taxes. Nothing terribly exciting, but he gets credit for doing it. (Politico)

Jumaane Williams, who is both the city’s public advocate and also captain obvious, said that the Hudson Yards is “not for a majority of this city.” (amNY)

The state’s legislature is pushing forward with a bill that would ban religious exemptions for the measles-vaccine for any child attending schools in New York state. Rockland County’s outbreak has infected 186 and Brooklyn’s has infected 259. The World Health Organization labeled measles as one of the 10 largest threats to global health in 2019. (Downtown Express)

An interview with Dr. Jan Kaminsky, Director of Education at Rainbow Health Consulting, and is also developing a National LGBTQ+ Nurses Association. (Gothamist)

The best bars in Soho and Nolita. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for February 12, 2019 – The “Sometimes You Need To Look at Photos of Dogs” Edition

Congestion pricing and legal recreational marijuana get real, the mayor won’t act on parking placard abuse, but the City Council will, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

If you haven’t gone outside yet, today’s weather is going to be miserable. (Patch)

Take a look inside Seth Meyers’ apartment. (Curbed)

The story behind the Harriet Tubman Memorial “Swing Low” on 122nd Street. (6sqft)

Photos from The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. You know you can’t resist. (Gothamist)

It’s 0.0000797113 of an acre on the corner of Seventh Ave and Christopher Street and if you don’t look down at the right moment you’ll miss a significant piece of defiant private property that defines the spirit of the Village. (NY Times)

There is a 2017 city law that dictates that all entrances used by pedestrians must have visible numbers. Over 53% of buildings on 42nd Street are missing numbers. City Councilmember Jumaane Williams introduced the law and is tired of selective enforcement. (amNY)

The five oldest buildings in Manhattan. (Untapped Cities)

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s public school report that addresses segregation in education is released. Now that his crutch of talking about how the report is coming has been removed, the mayor has to actually do something, which is not his strong suit. (NY Times)

New York will likely lose a seat in the House of Representatives in 2020, and New York Democrats could redraw Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’ district to remove her from Congress. If AOC is asked to leave with such a large national profile, she could target Chuck Schumer’s senate seat in 2022. (The Intercept)

Getting a tattoo in a subway car? Unless you love staph infections, it’s not a great idea. Maybe that’s why TuffCity Tattoo created a replica car. (Untapped Cities)

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the New York Public Library has released an interactive map of fictional love in the city. (6sqft)

CatVideoFest is shockingly not happening in Williamsburg or Bushwick. (Brooklyn Paper)

Governor Cuomo’s transportation deputy unveiled their latest proposal for congestion pricing. Implementation would go into effect in 2021 and any vehicle going into the “central business district” in Manhattan would be charged roughly $11.52, no matter where you enter. There will be no business exemption and the funds will be put into a “lockbox” for the MTA. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

McNally Jackson is staying in SoHo. They’re not moving, but they’re opening two new stores in City Point in Brooklyn and the South Street Seaport. (The Real Deal)

Upstate says they’ll take Amazon HQ2 if we don’t want it. Maybe the Syracuse-Rochester corridor forgets that Amazon has to want to be there. (NY Post)

“We have reminded the folks there that we are still here” New Jersey also would take HQ2, but Governor Phil Murphy said it in the saddest way possible. (NY Post)

Ruben Diaz Sr, noted homophobe and city council member, says that he is the victim in this story. (Patch)

Curbed is hiring a full-time, junior-level reporter. (Curbed)

Kings Plaza Shopping Center, the site of the large fire that injured over 20 people in September of last year, continues to receive fines for illegally storing cars. Their latest fine could be $25,000, their second in the last six months. (Brooklyn Paper)

You haven’t missed the news. The jury in the El Chapo trial are still deliberating. (NY Post)

Here are the city’s 20 most dangerous one-lane intersections for pedestrians and cyclists. (Localize.city)

The L train mystery odor is one week old and it has two new siblings. Joining the party is a thick fog and the smell of rubbing alcohol. The smell appears to be permeating the subways into nearby apartments. (Gothamist)

The City Council unveiled multiple bills that would mandate proactive enforcement and increase oversight of parking placard abuse. One bill would ban city vehicles from blocking crosswalks, fire hydrants, sidewalks, bike lanes and bus lanes unless there is an emergency. It’s maddening that this is currently legal. (Patch)

According to the state budget: Recreational marijuana will come with three taxes. $1 per dry weight gram of flower and $0.25 per gram of trim, 20% sales tax and a 2% local sales tax. You would be able to grow and process up to six plants on private property, using it would be illegal except for private property and can’t take it across state lines. (amNY)

A gym teacher in Brooklyn was fired for playing Fortnite with his students. (NY Post)

HUD administrator Lynne Patton’s stunt of living in different NYCHA buildings for the next four weeks has already been proven to be a farce. (NY Post)

The mayor is so sure that he’s such done a great job that he’s headed to New Hampshire to continue flirting with running for president. (NY Post)

Where to eat near Grand Central.

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The Briefly for May 14, 2018 – Bootlegger Busted, Don’t Feed Rats, Ferry Subsidies, AriZona Tattoos, and More

A prominent Staten Island Doctor was sentenced to two years in prison after being found guilty of taking more than $80k in bribes from a blood lab in New Jersey. Literal blood money!

A Queens principal earning $157,000 salary was reassigned after multiple sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuits cost the city over $600,000 to settle. Must be nice to have that kind of job security.

Following last week’s arrest of the Shomrim Safety Patrol president on rape charges, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle outlines a troubling history of the Shomrim. BKLYNER has more about why the Shomrim president’s arrest is important.

A former CB6 manager got a pay raise of $38,345 by forging the signature of his boss. He would’ve have gotten away with it too if it wasn’t for those pesky cops.

Sheldon Silver? Still guilty of fraud, money laundering, and extortion!

Congrats to the owner of Red Hook Winery for being the first bootlegger bust in the city since 1960.

The city, unable to let a single fad pass it by, announced a blockchain resource center and a contest for best way to use it in the public sector. “It’s, uh, like bitcoin but for reporting jaywalking and, hmmm, ordering pizza.

A woman was killed in an execution-style murder in a Brooklyn public housing development bear the Broadway Triangle in Brooklyn last week and over the weekend the man who lived next door to her was found shot dead.

Assembly member Rodneyse Bichotte makes the case for Little Haiti in Brooklyn.

New Jersey won a SCOTUS case that will allow legalized betting on sports in casinos and racetracks. Assembly member Joe Lentol wants sports betting in New York.

A new law will require all buildings with three or more apartments to develop a smoking policy. Get ready for in-home smoking bans.

Get ready for midtown-style pedestrian areas in the financial district.

Free AriZona iced tea tattoos at the AriZona iced tea pop up shop this week. Reminder: tattoo removal costs more than 99 cents.

City hall is fighting NYC’s growing rat population with… an information campaign telling you not to feed the rats.


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