The Briefly for February 5-6, 2021 – The “New York is Dead. Don’t Come Back.” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Pity the millionaires on Park Ave, mayoral candidates back away from defund the police, searching for the perfect mozzarella stick, & more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.
This weekend – Low: 21˚ High: 37˚

• Battery-powered sweatshirts, blanket rentals, navigating a meal in the dark, and the highs and lows of eating outside in sub-freezing temperature. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

• Nothing is as New York as putting up billboards in Los Angeles and Miami saying “New York is Dead. Don’t Come Back.” Kudos to The Locker Room, a female-owned Brooklyn-based creative house, for the idea. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Restaurant workers are now eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine. It took less than a day after announcing indoor dining’s that Governor Cuomo realized that sending people indoors to interact with a staff that is unvaccinated is the idea of an idiot. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Eastern Queens is a vaccine desert. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

Yankee Stadium opens as a vaccination spot today with appointments available for Bronx residents. There are appointments available. (Shannan Ferry for NY1)

• The MTA opened a new entrance to the Nostrand A/C station on Thursday. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

• It’s pretty common advice in the city to avoid looking like a tourist by not looking up as you walk, that likely makes the Walk of Fame at Theater 80 on St. Marks one of the city’s most well-seen landmarks. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

12 new public art installations in February at Times Square, Rockefeller Center, the Port Authority and more. (Michelle Young Untapped New York)

• Real Estate Lust: A $2.65 million Crown Heights townhouse with a massive backyard and beautiful an en-suite bathroom with separate tub and shower. Sometimes a listing is just nice to look at because you’ve been inside your apartment for nearly a year and it’s just nice to think about being somewhere else for a moment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

• No one should be surprised at a headline that reads “Rockaway ‘pizza nazi’ charged with harassing ex-girlfriend.” (David Brand for Queens Post)

The search for the impossibly perfect mozzarella stick with Big Stick Willy’s in the East Village. (Megan Pzetzhold for Grub Street)

• The discriminatory loitering law known as a ban on “walking while trans” has been repealed by the state’s legislature. State Senator Brad Hoylman of Manhattan and Assemmblymember Amy Paulin of Westchester were the bill’s lead sponsors. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The Harriet and Thomas Truesdell House at 227 Duffield Street was designated an individual landmark by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, ending a sixteen year-long fight to preserve the structure which is to believed had once been a stop on the Underground Railroad. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Ranked Choice Voting was unnecessary for the city’s first election utilizing it. Congrats to Democrat James Gennaro on winning the Queens City Council District 24 election. (Christine Chung for The City)

Meet the self-appointed and self-proclaimed Nut-Butter Don of Flatbush. (Emma Orlow for Grub Street)

• Remember the nets installed under the 7 train to prevent debris from falling onto pedestrians and vehicles? Well now they’re full of snow and are being described as “vast, pendulous sacks.” Apparently the MTA didn’t think about what happens when it snows when installing them. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

• The Hess spite triangle, my favorite spot in NYC, is for sale with the Village Cigars Building on the corner of Seventh Ave South and Christopher Street for $5.5 million. (Sophia Chang and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)`

• Pity the inhabitants of 432 Park, one of the wealthiest addresses and once the tallest residential buildings in the world, who complain about leaks, a creaky building, and elevator malfunctions. One prerequisite for living in the building is spending $15,000 a year at its private restaurant, overseen bu a Michelin-star chef. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

• Chicago pizza, Philly cheesesteaks, Nashville hot chicken, Detroit pizza, and now St. Louis wings? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

• Staten Island’s Republican Representative Nicole Malliotakis voted against certifying the 2020 election results, held a “Get Well Soon” rally for former President Trump, and one of her campaign operatives and longtime friend posted a video saying “Heil Hitler” on Facebook. Now Malliotakis has a new opponent. The Nicole is Complicit PAC raised $20,000 within four hours of launching its website to ensure that Malliotakis is a one term member of Congress. (Jazmine Hughes for NY Times)

The filming locations for Netflix’s Unorthodox. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

• Patch wants to find NYC’s worst slush puddle. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Brooklyn Botanic Garden has launched a series of guided audio walks and installations, offering in-depth visits that remain socially distanced. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

• Photos: Swoon’s sculpture and mobile performance stage The House Our Families Built, now at Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

• Two men being held on Rikers Island filed a lawsuit in that the state’s rules allowing immunizations for residents of other congregate settings like nursing homes, shelters and long-term care facilities while excluding incarcerated people is “arbitrary and capricious.” The lawsuit argues that all people in prisons and jails should be given access to vaccines. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• City Councilman Carlos Menchaca is seeking to remove Former President Trump’s name from city properties citing a Department of Buildings statute that regulates signs effect on “quality of life in a particular neighborhood.” (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

3 Super Bowl specials to order, even if you don’t watch the game. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

New York has been declared the best city in the country for pizza addicts. It isn’t an addiction, it’s a deep and undying appreciation! (Anna ben Yehuda for Time Out)

• Mayor de Blasio appointed a new head of the Department of Transportation and he’s a political ally with no experience in transportation. Commissioner Gutman, who now runs the $1.3 billion department, promised the installation of 10,000 bike parking racks. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

21 restaurants offering Valentine’s Day specials. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

• The New York Botanical Garden announced new dates for Yayoi Kusama’s KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature exhibition, Saturday, April 10 to Sunday, October 31, 2021. (6sqft)

What you need to know about the District Attorney races in 2021. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Andrew Yang tested positive for Covid-19. He’s been the candidate for mayor who has held the most in-person events and already had to quarantine once due to a staffer testing positive. (Katie Glueck for NY Times)

• Following up with the mayoral candidates that supported calls to Defund the Police when it was the politically expedient thing to say. Unsurprisingly, as candidates, everyone’s tone has changed. (Jeffery C. Mays and Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

• Mayoral candidates Shaun Donovan, Kathryn Garcia, Andrew Yang, Carlos Menchaca, Maya Wiley, and Ray McGuire support requiring NYPD officers to live in NYC. More than half of the NYPD’s uniformed officers currently live outside the city. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

• Interview: Isaac Wright Jr. discusses his run for mayor. (Ben Max for Gotham Gazette)

A running list of new restaurants that opened in February. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Thanks to reader Amanda Hatfield for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for October 23 – 24, 2020 – The “2,400 Subway Cars on the Ocean Floor” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The new Rudy Giuliani fiasco, the city is behind on hundreds of reporting deadlines, median rents in Manhattan fall under $3k, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 66˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 46˚ High: 70˚

If you need some fresh hell to wade through, there’s the Giuliani story coming out of the new Borat movie. Never in my life did I want to be reading this much analysis if Rudy Giuliani was touching his dick or not, but here we are. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The attorney behind the lawsuit trying to shut down the temporary homeless shelter on the Upper West Side, Randy Mastro, had his townhouse vandalized. Couldn’t have happened to a nicer guy. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Video: What do you call 2,400 subway cars at the bottom of the ocean? A good start! Just kidding. Let’s ask a marine biologist. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

What the hell is going on at city hall that they’ve missed hundreds of deadlines to provide statistical reports? Name a department and they’ve blown a deadline. (Claudia Irizarry Apone for The City)

Among the list of things the city hasn’t reported on? School attendance data. You might say that they’re… absent. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Photos: New York City’s most impressive Halloween decorated house. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The time for baking artisanal bread is over. Welcome to the era of funfetti cake. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: Susan Sarandon’s Chelsea duplex sold for $7.9 million. That’s a lot of ping pong money. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Nothing to see here, just NYPD officers Kyle Erickson and Elmer Pastran caught on video planting pot on someone during a traffic stop. They’ve been caught doing it before too. The Staten Island DA says he sees no criminal activity. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

An elderly woman in the Seward Park Co-op on the Lower East Side had been living with her husband’s rotting corpse for the last two weeks. 2020. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The MTA has released a new nearly real-time subway map. While the animations are cool and having it be “real time” is cool, “How real is real-time? You’re still getting some train data minutes after it comes in.” (Christopher Bonanos for Curbed)

Travel isn’t banned, but the governor thinks you shouldn’t be going to Connecticut or New Jersey right now. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

New Jersey appears to be headed towards a second Covid-19 wave. (Karen Yi for Gothamist)

Just in case the city’s new Covid-19 restrictions weren’t confusing enough, the state has instituted a new microcluster strategy. At this point, trying to round up how this works is beyond this email. (Jesse McKinley and J. David Goodman for NY Times)

Check the map, enter your address to check your zone. (Arcgis)

Nothing to see here, just a prisoner who escaped police custody Thursday morning outside Harlem Hospital. (Nick Garber for Patch)

Go on a hike without needing a car. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Environmentalists stormed the headquarters of National Grid in Downtown Brooklyn Thursday calling for state ownership over the local power grid. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

10 local illustrators on how New Yorkers feel about the upcoming election. I just want it to be over already. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

New York City is suing the federal government over the whole “Anarchist Jurisdiction” thing. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Millions of Republican dollars are flowing into Staten Island in an attempt to push out freshman Congressperson Max Rose in support of his Republican opponent Nicole Malliotakis. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Photos: The Village Halloween parade is canceled, so this photo gallery set might be your way to enjoy Halloween in the Village. (Tequila Minsky for amNewYork Metro)

24 percent of the city’s subway and bus workers have had Covid-19. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Keep your eyes peeled for these @WildCityNYC flyers strewn about the city. Learn things like which birds are “FAST AS F*CK” or what famous hot duck is currently “MISSING” or who the real “NEW YORK GIANTS” are. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A Manhattan “milestone” has been reached: Median rents fell below $3,000. (Stefanos Chen for NY Times)

Photos: Check out the world’s largest pumpkins at the New York Botanical Garden. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

29 top Vietnamese restaurants in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for July 19, 2020 – The “Phase Four Starts Monday” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A look at phase four, Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars, how to see the comet Neowise before it disappears, Metro-North has an awful new superhero & more

Hey! The Briefly is still a one-man hobby, and I overslept on Friday!

Phase four will start on Monday, but it’s been modified. Initially, phase four was supposed to include indoor venues, building on phase three’s indoor dining. No indoor activities are included in phase four. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The official list of what qualifies for phase four: Higher Education, Pre-K to Grade 12 Schools, Low-Risk Outdoor Arts & Entertainment, Low-Risk Indoor Arts & Entertainment, Media Production, Professional Sports Competitions With No Fans, and Malls. The indoor arts and entertainment is pertaining to museums and galleries and not seeing your favorite band play for a dozen people. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

New York City has public-drinking laws, of course, which include the regulation of open containers. Some New Yorkers have treated the city’s temporary takeout-cocktail laws as a cause for celebration, an opening of the streets. New Orleans meets Manhattan. But not me. While bars and restaurants reopen, the lines between which people get to enjoy these laws and which people do not are clearer than ever before. There are no alfresco dinner parties in the projects.
– Christian Rodriguez, Who Really Gets to Drink Outside in New York? for Eater

The rollout for Governor Cuomo’s new rules for bars and restaurants was a bit shaky. There’s a new three-strike system, where noncompliance with to-go alcohol mandates or social distancing will earn an establishment up to three strikes before having its liquor license suspended, but also egregious violations could mean an immediate suspension. The new rules will mean that you’ll likely see a few small bullshit food items handed out alongside a to-go drink. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Coverage of closing restaurants:

An ode to Odessa. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

What to order from Angkor before it closes on August 1. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Hunky Dory is reopening, but without tipping. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Lilia is reopening for outdoor dining in Williamsburg and there’s already a multi-week wait. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Dirt Candy is back with takeout and outdoor dining. (Scott Lynch and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Smorgasburg is coming back too, with takeout only. Does takeout exist from an outdoor tent? (Erika Adams for Eater)

Grand Central Terminal’s food hall is open again. With no possible way to participate in outdoor dining at Grand Central, is it the only place in the city with indoor dining? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

20 Michelin-starred restaurants that are open for outdoor dining. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The Bronx’s Little Italy on Arthur Avenue, aka “Piazza di Belmont” is taking over the street for most of the weekend over the summer. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

The 9 best streets for outdoor dining in NYC this summer. Glad to see Arthur Ave is at the top of this list. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

How to see the comet Neowise in the city. You’ve got about a week to try to see it before it leaves for 6,000 years. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The mayor is calling for all 1,349 curfew protesters to face charges. Curfew violations are a Class B misdemeanor and punishable with up to a $500 fine and three months in jail. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

One bad take deserves another. Here’s a bad take from Governor Cuomo, who opposes a billionaire’s tax because he says the ultra-rich will just leave New York. New York has 118 billionaires who increased their wealth by $77 billion over the four months of staying at home. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A review of Brooklyn Noosh on Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn and it’s “secret garden” for outdoor dining with a recommendation for the Flamin’ Hot Cheeto Wings. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

How to order takeout from Rao’s Italian food in East Harlem since landing one of the restaurant’s ten coveted tables is out of most of our grasp. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A fascinating question. Without food service jobs to subsidize their lives and art, what will happen to New York’s creative class? (Deepti Hajela for AP)

Metro-North now has its own extremely lame superhero. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The New York Botanical Garden is opening up on July 28. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in the West Village. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)