The Briefly for October 16 – 17, 2020 – The “Greatest Mystery of 2020” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: NYPD’s Chief of Patrol resigns, the new rules for outdoor dining, how to negotiate rent, all the mayoral candidates dunk on de Blasio & more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 64˚
Rain throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 48˚ High: 62˚

Video: Watch the congressional debate between Congressmember Max Rose and NY Assemblyperson Nicole Malliotakis. Vote for Max Rose. (NY1)

“Time and time again, Trump-loving State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis has used votes and influence as an elected official to fight against efforts to improve LGBTQ rights — and there’s a chance she could bring her bigoted politics to the national stage.”
-Matt Tracy, Nicole Malliotakis’ Dismal Record on LGBTQ Issues for Gay City News

Farewell to Dangerfield’s on the Upper East Side, which was forced to close after 50 years. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

This is, and I can’t understate this enough, the greatest mystery of the year. (EV Grieve)

City civilian inspectors gave out 1,095 Covid-19 safety measure violations to 247 spots between Sept. 29 and Oct. 13, according to Mayor de Blasio’s office. The biggest offense? Lack of cleaning log. (Reuven Blau for The City)

Another fight in the endless battle between Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio: if yeshivas can decide they’re “childcare centers to skirt the state’s red zone rules. Cuomo says no, of course, the mayor disagrees. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo has gone as far as saying that he’ll revoke funding from non-compliant yeshivas, threatening to “withhold funding until the matter is resolved to our satisfaction.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

52% of the city’s public school students are enrolled in remote learning. That’s a 2% increase from last week. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Juneteenth is now an official public holiday in New York State. Governor Cuomo signed it into legislation this week, beating Mayor de Blasio to the punch, who claimed he would make it a holiday in the city by 2021. (Zainab Iqbal for Bklyner)

Apartment Porn: A $6.25 million Brooklyn Heightsfive-bedroom townhouse with a velour reading nook, a backyard, and lots of color. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The NYPD is preparing for election protests according to a new memo issued by Commissioner Dermot Shea. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Attorney General Letitia James is recommending that the NYPD be removed from conducting traffic stops after the fatal shooting of Allan Feliz, whom cops killed during a so-called routine traffic stop in the Bronx last year. Her recommendation is to shift to automated enforcement and redesigning roads to make it harder to speed and break traffic rules. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The New York Philharmonic canceled all of its performances through June 2021. This is an extension of their previous cancelation that was scheduled to end January 5. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

A statue of Ruth Bader Ginsburg is coming to Downtown Brooklyn’s City Point in 2021. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Speaking of statues, check out the new sculpture of Medusa holding the decapitated of Perseus that is now outside the New York County Criminal Courthouse on Centre Street. The sculpture was created by artist Luciano Garbati. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city has new rules for outdoor dining this winter that will allow for electric heaters, natural gas heaters, and propane heaters. Maybe it’s time to invest in some “restaurant blankets.” (Will Gleason for Time Out)

For now, here’s a list of restaurants with outdoor heating lamps. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Grand Central is looking to alter its rent agreement with its tenants, with the MTA will take a percentage of rent from the restaurants and other small businesses based on gross revenue. Apple won’t be getting a break, just the smaller businesses. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

No need to panic (yet), but State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli said that without federal aid, we’re looking at “the end of regional public transit as we have known it.” (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

What we’re talking about when we say tax the rich. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

“After hearing that I would be kicked out of the Lucerne, I felt traumatized – dehumanized at the thought of being moved from shelter to shelter like a pawn on a chessboard during a global pandemic. The words of the mayor brought back thoughts of traumatic experiences from my past, as a young child growing up in New York City’s foster care system.”
-Shams DaBaron, City’s Move to Vacate UWS Hotel Shelter is Adding ‘Trauma on Top of Trauma,’ Resident Says for City Limits

How to negotiate rent on a city apartment. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

In May, Mayor de Blasio assembled a Surface Transportation Advisory Council to provide suggestions to keep people safe as the city reopens. The mayor has ignored all of their recommendations has not responded to their open letter written on September 1. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio’s five head “neighborhood policing” effort has done little to slow crime or eliminate racial bias in who gets charged, according to a new study. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

With less than a year in the position, NYPD Chief of Patrol Fausto Pichardo decided to reture. Reports say that he was a “leave the NYPD alone” guy and “always hated the mayor.” (Jake Offenhartz, Jen Chung, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio has denied there was “friction” between him and Pichardo, so you there was friction. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Gallery: The spooky homes of NYC. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Maybe we all need to embrace this makeshift shrine to Mercury that was left at the Utica Ave A/C stop. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here are the 2020 Tony Award nominees. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

The first virtual mayoral forum featuring seven potential mayoral candidates was held this week and there was one thing they all had in common. No one likes the mayor. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The 10 best bánh mì in the city. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for April 28, 2020 – The “de Blasio Forced to Make Another Popular Decision” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NY calls off the presidential primary, the L train is back, where to get a fresh bagel, AOC supports rent strikers, looking at reopening and more

Today – Low: 48˚ High: 61˚
Clear throughout the day.

Alt-side parking has been suspended citywide through May 12. (Norwood News)

How to watch today’s Blue Angels flight over New York City today. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

For every celebration, there’s always a buzzkill. Streetsblog is here to ensure you can’t enjoy some planes flying overhead today. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor has given in when it comes to opening streets to pedestrians and cyclists, announcing that 40 miles of streets will be opened up this month and an additional 60 miles will be opened up soon. the mayor deserves literally zero credit for this because the City Council backed him into a corner and Governor Cuomo said in his press conference that he supports opening streets up. Much like his presidential campaign, he was the last person to see that no one supported his position. (Danielle Muoio for Politico)

The New York State Board of Elections canceled the June presidential primary, citing the June date as an opportunity to vote for actual elections and candidates and not for the purposes of issues at a convention, which was Bernie Sanders’s stated reason for not dropping out of the race completely. The Sanders campaign, as you could imagine, is ornery about the decision. (Brigid Bergin and David Cruz for Gothamist)

Also canceled was the special election for Rafael Espinal’s vacated City Council seat. Mad the election continued, voters would have had to vote twice on June 23, once in the primary and once in the actual election, and all for a single six-month term. Corey Johnson will manage the district while the seat is vacant. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

One thing that New York City will be known for after the pandemic is behind us is its inequality, which extends to a hospital system where Warren Buffet personally intervenes to get one hospital supplies and another made room for patients out of duct tape and plastic tarps. (Michael Schwirtz and Kirsten Luce for NY Times)

Most New Yorkers trust Governor Cuomo over President Trump when it comes to reopening the state according to a Siena College poll. I think most New Yorkers would trust my dog Pepper over the president when it comes to reopening the state. (NY1)

A closer look at the governor’s plan to dip New York’s toe into the waters of reopening. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s already hard enough to remove an emotionally disturbed customer from the subways who was chasing other riders around and trying to light subway ads on fire but add in COVID-19 fears and also he was naked. (Jose Martinez for The City)

The L train is back to full operation just in time for no one to care. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The Office to Combat Domestic Violence launched a chat and text service on Friday to help New Yorkers discreetly report domestic violence. The office is suggesting the number be stored until a fake name. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A case against the city’s gun laws came before the US Supreme Court, but by the time it reached the court city and state laws had changed, making the case moot. The case was dismissed by the court. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

New York City is looking to hire 1,000 medical professionals to serve as contact tracers as the city begins to plan its own reopening. The tracers will interview people who have tested positive in hopes of identifying people who may need to be tested or quarantined. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The Atlantic Boat Club in Crown Heights continued to serve customers after the shutdown and the state liquor authority has revoked their license. They face fines up to $40,000 and revocation of their liquor license. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Where you can still get a fresh bagel in NYC. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

A few weeks ago I came across someone’s Instagram story who was showing a group of vehicles that included cars, bikes, scooters, ATVs, and go-carts, which seems just as weird on a city street as you might think. Seems I wasn’t the only person to take notice of these vehicles in the street because the NYPD seized 20 off-road vehicles that were “terrorizing” the streets over the weekend. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

“Sir, this is a Wendy’s.” A man without a face mask caused $1k of damage to a Wendy’s in the Bronx. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

It’s weird to see Times Square so empty, but of course, the Naked Cowboy is still there. He’s like a roach in the apocalypse. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The New York Philharmonic is still playing together, even while separate. Watch and hear their latest performance of “Adagietto” from Mahler’s Symphony No. 5. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Now through May 25, Coney Island USA (the home of the sideshow) is running a mask design contest called “Put on a Funny Face” through May 25 with 11 different winning categories. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Success Academy Charter Schools will continue to use a traditional grading while the Department of Education is planning a new grading system for the remainder of the school year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Rent strikers have Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s support. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The delivery guide for a big night in. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for March 30, 2020 – The “Buying Whiskey for a Good Cause” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Central Park becomes a field hospital for COVID-19 patients, Amazon continues to expand its NYC footprint, you can still move apartments, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 48˚
Drizzle in the morning and afternoon.

Can you move during the pandemic? Yes. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

In September of 2018, a construction crew in Elmhurst accidentally exhumed the mummified remains of a smallpox victim from the 1850s. Was that a bad omen? (Ephemeral New York)

The New York Bacon and Beer Classic was rescheduled to September 26. Isn’t it nice to think that life will return to normal at some point in the future? (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

Wheated is selling off its whiskey collection to help its laid-off employees. If you were looking to get your hands on some great whiskey at a reasonable price in Ditmas Park, you know where to go. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Maybe whiskey’s not your thing? Some restaurants have merch available. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The definition of what consists of a “real emergency” has changed. With a record volume of 911 calls, the FDNY is asking anyone who is thinking of calling 911 for coronavirus-related reasons to call a doctor first. (Jenna Amatulli for HuffPost)

Photos: Inside the new 1,000-bed Javits Center hospital. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Aqueduct Racetrack, the Brooklyn Cruise Terminal, the CUNY College of Staten Island, and the New York Expo Center will become temporary hospital sites that will add an additional 4,000 hospital beds to the city. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Central Park’s East Meadow is being used as an emergency field hospital for COVID-19 patients. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Elon Musk is sending 615 ventilators to the city, wait, why did Elon Musk have 615 ventilators to start? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Ample Hills is laying off all 101 of its workers. This, unlike their recent bankruptcy announcement, is related to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

Photos: New York’s first complete week of pandemic dining. (Gary He for Eater)

It started as a list of the best things to eat in New York, now it’s a list of 101 things we hope we can eat again soon. (Grub Street)

Here are all the Michelin-rated restaurants in the city that are now offering takeout or delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted a pet, there is quite literally no time like the present to adopt one. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

The bars are closed, the restaurants shuttered, the gyms are barren, but there is a place for some New Yorkers to be social and remain physically distant: the stoop. (Doug Gordon for Curbed)

Con Ed suspended checking gas and electric meters, so if someone comes to your door claiming to be from Con Ed, ignore them. (Brooklyn Eagle)

The state has put an end to “non-essential” construction, limiting active construction to building hospitals, infrastructure projects, affordable housing, and homeless shelters. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

The Empire State building is working with Z100 to put together a light show every night at 9pm with new shows debuting on Friday nights. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

So how did the first week of remote learning go? (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

Add the New York Philharmonic to the list of organizations streaming free performances. Check out past performances on Thursday nights. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s first map with any COVID-19 information is exceptionally unhelpful. Par for the course from the de Blasio administration. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Amazon bought the Lord & Taylor Building at 424 Fifth Avenue for one billion dollars. Amazon continues to expand its NYC footprint, despite not getting a ridiculous tax break from the city and state. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

Photos: Turns out we’re still pretty bad at social distancing in city parks. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The NYPD was authorized to give $250 – $500 fines to people who aren’t maintaining social distance, but only if they fail to disperse when ordered or if officers find people in the same place twice. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Pregnant women will not be forced to give birth without having someone with them. A new executive order from Governor Cuomo breaks any ban that was previously put in place by hospitals. It’s amazing how quickly the government can move when it is motivated. (Katie Van Syckle and Christina Caron for NY Times)

The state’s tax deadline and the presidential primary were moved. The tax deadline to July 15 and the primary to June 23. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Along with the presidential primary, local elections were moved, creating questions about how the elections for Queens borough president and open city council seats. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte and Christine Chung for The City)

One week after calling for a complete lockdown of the city, Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is calling for the city to close all parks and playgrounds. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Over the weekend, Rhode Island restricted access to the state for New Yorkers and then lifted their restrictions after Cuomo threatened to sue. (Bill Mahoney for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the “new” Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who is starting to appear much more like the rest of the democrats than her previous spitfire self. (Alex Thompson and Holly Otterbein for Politico)

A brief list of notable people who have tested positive for COVID-19 this weekend: MTA Chairman and CEO Pat Foye, Knicks owner James Dolan, Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz. All three are isolating and seem to be doing okay. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro, Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro, and Erin Durkin for Politico)

17 Thai delivery and takeout picks. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Dylan for today’s featured photo in Domino Park, which accurately captures how we’re all feeling.