The Briefly for July 28, 2020 – The “Someone Knows Your Pandemic Secret” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Please shut up, the shifting definition of “bar food,” the most checked out book from the NYPL, new restaurant openings, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 92˚
Rain in the evening.

The New York Liberty and Seattle Storm have set the bar for National Anthem protests. Rather than take a knee, both teams walked off the court completely. After a 26 second silence in honor of Breonna Taylor, the teams left. Will anyone else step up or will the Liberty reign as the most badass team in NY? (Lam Thuy Vo for BuzzFeed News)

How to move a couch in or out of a small apartment. (Zachary Soloman for StreetEasy)

Our tailors know our dirty little pandemic secret. We all got fat. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

How to get into Gramercy Park, the most exclusive park in the city, where only 383 keys exist for its locks. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Busking is tough. Busking during a pandemic is even tougher. Now, imagine busking while carrying around a 900-pound piano. (Alex Vadukul and September Dawn Bottoms for NY Times)

An occupational therapist makes the argument that students should be learning outdoors this fall. (Lisa Raymond-Tolan for Chalkbeat)

Elizabeth Street Garden’s Executive Director Joseph Reiver offers up the Elizabeth Street Garden for schools to use. (Joseph Reiver For Bowery Boogie)

Wish the city was still open despite the pandemic? They tried keeping things open to keep up New Yorkers’ spirits. It didn’t go great for the city. (Laura Collins-Hughes for NY Times)

There’s a state law preventing public employees from striking, but NYC public school teachers are devising ways to push back if forced to teach in-person classes in the fall. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

This will be the first year that on 9/11, the names of the victims will not be read by members of their families. (NY1)

All abord the sludge boat! With Covid-19 in our poops, the boat that carries those poops away from the city is one of the most important boats in the city. (Roger Clark for NY1)

Apartment Porn: It’s $9.9 million on the Upper East Side, 5,000 square feet, nearly 21-foot tall ceilings, a 40-foot garden, and a private parking garage. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

What is food? While this is a dumb question, at this point the State Liquor Authority is making me wonder what is even food. The constantly shifting definition of what food can be served with alcohol from the SLA is maddening. Let us have our booze or don’t, but don’t make me order a sandwich with my shot. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Farewell to La Caridad 78, a Chinese-Cuban restaurant that’s been open for 52 years on the Upper West Side is closing for good. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Le Sia, the Chinese-Cajun restaurant in the East Village. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Farewell to the Rusty Knot in the West Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Chumley’s in the West Village, two years shy of its centennial. There was an auction for most of what was inside the bar, but the auction was canceled, further confusing the situation. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Photos: A look at Saturday’s Unite NY 2020 rally with the Street Riders, Warriors in the Garden, and the Black Chef Movement, which marched from Cadman Plaza in Brooklyn to Times Square and beyond. (Emmy Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

“New York’s recovery won’t be demonstrated by restoring the city to peak car traffic. Peak traffic never reflected New York’s full potential before the pandemic, it limited it. A car-based recovery would suck the oxygen out of the city and suffocate the city. Normal in New York is founded on the principle of independent transportation and the freedom of not needing a car to live and work in the city.”
-Janette Sadik-Khan, former NYC transportation commissioner, Why The Pandemic Represents A Historic Opportunity For NYC Streets, for Gothamist

A new memorial at the Williamsburg waterfront pays homage to almost 200 Black people who have been killed by police or have died fighting against racial injustice. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Riddle me this: When you Google “Waterbury Metro-North,” did the official MTA site read “Flirtatious Anal Dildo For Cock Hungry Blonde Slut?” (David Brand for Queens Eagle)

Will you please shut the hell up? Noise complaints are up 300% since February. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Queens, what’s up? Why has half of Queens not responded to the Census? (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Maybe it’s time to address the Native American in a loincloth on New York City’s official seal? (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

This one went right under my nose. A federal judge blocked the NYCLU from releasing the NYPD disciplinary records, but on the same day, ProPublica released a searchable database of the disciplinary records. ProPublica says they were allowed to post the database because they aren’t involved in the union lawsuit challenging the release of the records. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Twenty-seven New York City bars and restaurants on Sunday were cited by state inspectors for social distancing and other coronavirus-related violations. The state hasn’t released the list of bars and restaurants. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo is on top of the NYPL’s list of most checked out books during the lockdown. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

“They send me their keys and say, ‘Pack it up and put it in storage and we’ll figure it out later.’ There are so many people in flux.” Vacancy rates are growing throughout the city and how it could put the city’s rent regulation in jeopardy. (Greg David for The City)

19 new restaurant openings you should know about. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 28, 2020 – The “I Got About Five Friends Left” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The forever feuds between governors and mayors, who gave money to what candidate in your zip code, the best cocktails under $10, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 26˚ High: 43˚

What was the point of making the NYPD to wear body cameras if the Civilian Complaint Review Board, the very people who are supposed to have oversight of the NYPD, have to request the footage form the NYPD? (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are a lot of things that contributed to the Lower East Side gaining near-mythical status. Each story isn’t enough to turn a set of streets into a phenomenon on its own, but when combined into one tightly-packed neighborhood, it almost seems impossible that it was ever real at all two decades later. One of those places was Rainbow Shoe Repair, a cobbler’s shop that became the place to be photographed. Now some of those photographs have become an exhibition that will be touring the Lower East Side, including some displayed outside the Abrons Arts Center. (Untapped New York with photos by Daniel Terna)

Why is it that Chipotle is always front and center when it comes to labor law violations by fast food companies? (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Are New York governors and city mayors destined to feud forever? Governor Pataki, in his new books, says Mayor Giuliani asked him to cancel the 2001 mayoral elections so he would be able to stay in office longer after the 9/11 attacks. Giuliani denied the claim, but forgot to hangup the phone and said “I got about five friends left.” I’d feel bad for him if he wasn’t such a ghoul. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

If you want one last taste of receiving plastic bags when shopping in NY, make a point to do your shopping on Saturday. Sunday starts the plastic bag ban. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Are you one of the 9% of New Yorkers that would give up sex if you never had to deal with parking a car in the city? (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

This is a true Trump to City: Drop Dead moment. The Trump administration stopped a feasibility study, looking at how New York and New Jersey could be protected from future weather events like Superstorm Sandy. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

A driver killed a seven-year-old boy in East New York, making it the second child killed by the driver of a vehicle in three days in the neighborhood. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Chinatown building that housed the Museum of Chinese in America archives and was destroyed by a five-alarm fire in January will be demolished and rebuilt. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

In 2018 the city enacted a program where you could get paid 25% of a fine to report idling cars and trucks, which would be a payout ranging from a $75 to $500. There was the billboard campaign featuring cartoon birds reminding everyone to stop idling their cars. Clearly that didn’t work, because the city is back with a new campaign featuring Billy Idol entitles “Billy Never Idles.” Despite the campaign, filing a complaint through the city’s 311 app is not possible. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The “I Wanna Quit the Gym” bill passed the state senate and i headed to the assembly. Pretty soon you’ll be able to cancel that NYSC membership that accidentally renewed because you forgot about it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

No one has tested positive for coronavirus in the city or state, but that hasn’t stopped the growing anxiety of knowing it’ll be on our doorstep sooner or later. The city and state say they are prepared with plans for hospitals, schools, mass transit, businesses and mass gatherings along with supplies at the ready and $40 million in funding to fight the virus. (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The NYPL is about to debut their first-ever permanent exhibition entitled “Treasures,” with items from the archives like a copy of the Declaration of Independence in Thomas Jefferson’s handwriting, original Mozart and Beethoven sheet music, Sumerian tables, and more. “Treasures” will open in November. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Department of Transportation rejected an idea to move the Queens Blvd bike lane to the road’s median, but that didn’t stopp the mayor from publicly asking “what’s the harm in considering this idea that the DOT already said was a bad idea?” (Garsh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

This weekend starts the first #Never Bloomberg march at his townhouse on the Upper East Side, protesting his police surveillance of Muslims, stop and frisk, the homelessness spike under his watch, and the list goes on and on. The march is being lead by multiple groups, including the Working Families Party, who never endorsed Bloomberg for mayor in 2001, 2005, or 2009. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Congrats, Brooklyn. You’ve officially made it, being named TripAdvisor’s #5 trending destination in the United States. (Irina Groushevaia for BKLYNER)

The Brooklyn Public Library and the Brooklyn Historical Society have announced a new plan to merge. Jennifer Schuessler for NY Times)

As if having to go to New Jersey wasn’t enough of a punishment, a broken signal added insult to insult on Thursday’s evening rush hour commute, causing hour-long delays that began at 5:30. Sounds lovely. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Mayor Bloomberg took credit for getting gay marriage passed in New York, Governor Cuomo remember a different version of that story. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Video: A slide show on New York in the 1910s. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A week-long staycation in NYC. (Pardon Me For Asking)

Here are all the ways you pay taxes when you buy a home in the city. (Localize.Labs)

Who does New York support for president, financially? (RentHop)

The best cocktails for $10 and under. (Julien Levy for Thrillist)