The Briefly for January 26, 2020 – The “Isn’t A Dessert Bagel Called A Doughnut?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Andy Byford’s replacement pushed for the 500 subway cops, a $20,000/month apartment in Nolita, our hero Jane Jacobs, where to eat in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 50˚
Rain and windy overnight.

State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, a Republican, is asking the Trump administration to try to kill congestion pricing. Malliotakis, of course, represents Bay Ridge and Staten Island. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

An interview with Dermot Shea, Mayor de Blasio’s new republican NYPD Commissioner, who won’t say if he voted for Trump in 2016. (Jeff Coltin for City and State)

Meet Efren Andaluz, the artist who painted the Kobe and Gianna tribute mural near the Barclays Center. (Kimmy Dole for Hiplanta)

Andy Byford’s temporary replacement is someone who led the push for more subway cops, MTA board member Sarah Feinberg. Her focus while on the board has been quality of life issues and homelessness. Feinberg oversaw the Federal Railroad Administration when a series of explosive oil train derailments and deadly commuter railroad crashes made headlines during the Obama administration. (Stephen Nessen, Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

See hundreds of pieces of Seneca Village artifacts online through the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission website. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Brooklyn Public Library’s University Open Air kicks off this week, offering 25 college-level courses for free from an international staff. (Colin Mixson for Brooklyn Paper)

The city has health with the homelessness crisis like it’s something to be managed, not solved. Can NYC actually fix its homeless crisis? (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Photos: Inside Porto Rico, opened in 1907 and one of the city’s oldest coffee stores. (Noah Sheidlower, Photos by Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

A dessert bagel? (Juan Vidal for Grub Street)

If you drop something on the subway tracks, don’t try to get it yourself. Two people have been hit by the 6 train at Astor Place this week while trying to get something that dropped onto the tracks. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

On his way to jail after his rape conviction, Harvey Weinstein was re-routed to Bellevue Medical Center with heart palpitations, pain, and high blood pressure. Once he’s discharged, he’ll be headed to Rikers Island. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Looking for a bit of green for your apartment? The 10 best plants for apartment dwellers. (Rebecca Paul for 6sqft)

Apartment Porn: A $20,000/month 3,175 square foot rental in Nolita. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Amazon could buy the former Lord & Taylor building from WeWork for $1 billion. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

A look back at the birth of The Committee to Save the West Village, led by Jane Jacobs, who history has proven to be the hero compared to Robert Moses. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

Photos: Inside the “morgue” of The New York Times. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Goodbye Burger Heaven, after 77 years the Upper East Side diner is closing and going to diner heaven, blaming “delivery culture” on its demise. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

The MTA is moving forward on purchasing nearly 1,000 “open-gangway” subway cars. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

& Sons is a new ham bar in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens. Wait, a ham bar? (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Alligators in the sewers of New York City? Here’s the truth. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Governors Island has an opening date for the summer: May 1. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

RIP Michael Hertz, designer of the current subway map. (Neil Genzlinger for NY Times)

Salt Bae’s new burger restaurant, like the Salt Bae himself, seems like a giant joke that isn’t funny. Recently his parent company has been sued for sexual harassment and wage theft. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Where to eat in Staten Island, which Eater calls “a low-key culinary paradise.” (Claire Elisabeth for Eater)

“Saddest moment of my week, watching it roll onto the track seconds before the train pulled up.”

Thank you to reader Maiya for today’s featured photo and sad story.

The Briefly for October 10, 2019 – The “Subways Could Be Running 50% Faster” Edition

The voter registration deadline is coming up, unmasking the identity of real estate buyers, corruption along the 4th Ave bike lane, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The deadline to vote in this year’s general election is October 11. Get moving if you haven’t registered. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Early voting runs from October 26 through November 3 this year, but not every polling site will be an early voting site, so make sure to check where to take part in early voting. (amNY)

Construction has begun on Google’s 1.3 million square-foot Hudson Square campus. (6sqft)

A new report from the MTA notes that the subways are slower than they were 20 years ago and could be running 50% faster and to make it happen they only have to make four improvements. Don’t hold your breath, because one of the improvements is fixing the signal problems that plague just about every line. (6sqft)

It’s finally fall and Brooklyn Based has 18 ways to celebrate pumpkin season, none of them the PSL. (Brooklyn Based)

What to see in the city’s art galleries right now. (NY Times)

Excuse me, bagel tacos? (Gothamist)

The battle for Boerum Hill’s WBAI, which has been in operation since the ’60s, has gone legal between the Pacifica Foundation and the employees of the station. (Brooklyn Paper)

An interview with artist Shai Dahan, whose new Swedish Dala horse mural can be found on Broome St. (Brooklyn Street Art)

The 4th Ave bike lane in Brooklyn’s paint was barely dry before the 72nd Precinct decided that they would use it for parking. This is corruption. (Gothamist)

Where to get an Impossible Burger on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Tips and advice to upgrade your candy game this Halloween. (Grub Street)

There is a peanut-related recall of some Ample Hills ice cream, so if you or you know someone with allergies and a love for Peppermint Patty ice cream, here is your heads up. (Patch)

Video: Step inside the Brooklyn Superhero Supply Company and embrace your inner superhero… or villain. (Viewing NYC)

“Dedicated to the many tourists that go missing every year in New York City. And a reminder as to why the parks close at dusk. Erected by the Ed Koch Wolf Foundation and the NYC Fellowship.” A monument to the missing tourists taken by wolves appeared in Battery Park this week. (Untapped Cities)

The Bain Center, a literal jail on a boat in city waters, holds up to 800 prisoners a day that was brought to the city in 1992 as a temporary solution but has stuck around ever since. It’s scheduled to close by 2026. (NY Times)

Behind the scenes at the Forgotten NY blog. (amNY)

The famous and ultra-rich don’t buy homes in their names, they buy them using LLCs to hide their identity, but a bill signed into law by Governor Cuomo in September is going to possibly make the purchasers of real estate publicly available information. (Curbed)

Do you like The Strokes? How much? How about so much that you’ll rent an apartment in Nolita from their guitarist for $6,750 a month? (6sqft)

The best upscale seafood in NYC. (Grub Street)

The Briefly for August 16, 2019 – The “Everyone is Moving Slower Than We Used To” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, a look at “environmental review,” real estate brokers are finding ways around rent reforms, de Blasio eats a corn dog and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subways are seriously taking a break from normal service with disruptions on the 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, D, F, M, N, and the Staten Island Railway. (Subway Weekender)

What is “Environmental Review” and why NIMBY lawsuits cite it as a reason to kill projects like the Central Park West bike lane or 14 St busway. (Streetsblog)

A Bronx man will serve a three-to-nine-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter after fleeing the scene of a drunken car crash that killed Jose Cardoso. (Brooklyn Paper)

In the last 10 years, the average speed of a taxi below 60th St has gone from 9mph to 7mph, traffic speeds in midtown are down to 4.9 mph, subway and bus ridership declined, and it’s faster to get anywhere in midtown on a bike. Wherever we’re all going, we’re all getting there slower than ever, unless we’re on a bike. (Gothamist)

There will not be any charges against the driver who killed Aurilla Lawrence with a truck in a hit-and-run crash on February 28. It appears that if a driver claims they didn’t know they hit anyone, the NYPD won’t bring charges. (Streetsblog)

I believe we can all agree gentrification is inevitable, with both positive and negative outcomes,” says a man who is developing “co-living” real estate (read: dorm living for adults) in Bushwick who refuses to call himself a real estate developer. (NY Times)

Only for the brave: You can canoe the Gowanus Canal. (Brooklyn Based)

A guide to the city’s rental-finding websites. (Curbed)

Tribeca, NoLita, and Soho have remained the most expensive neighborhoods to live in for years, but Cobble Hill, Red Hook, and Grammercy Park are climbing that list quickly. (StreetEasy)

Everyone loves a list of hot spots unless it means a literal list of America’s hot spots where temperatures are rising dangerously fast and are past the point of “catastrophic effects.” (Patch)

Revel has added classes in August and September for people who feel trepidation about jumping on an electric moped for the first time. (Streetsblog)

Lobster rolls can be pretty expensive at times, but at $100, the roll at BK Lobster is “infused” with 24K gold. Thirsty for more gold? You can wash it down with wine with 23K gold flakes. (Eater)

Manero’s opens this weekend, the only slice shop on Mulberry St in Little Italy. If the name is familiar, it’s because it’s named for Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever and even features a double-decker slice in honor of the movie’s opening scene. (Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James’s office has the Sackler Family, the seeming creators of America’s opioid crisis and founders and owners of Perdue Pharma, in its sights. The AG is investigating if the owners hid billions of dollars in an effort to hide profits. (NY Times)

There’s a connection between the rise of Uber and the popularity of late-night and overnight badminton. (Gothamist)

37 chefs give their neighborhood gems. (Grub Street)

Before the Vanderbilts were the Vanderbilts, there was Cornelius Vanderbilt, the man who built the family’s fortunes. In 1794 he was born 209 Port Richmond Ave. You won’t find a monument to the man on that spot, you’ll find No. 1 Chinese Takeout. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after going for a run in Williamsburg, but also after you’ve had a shower and changed your clothes. (The Infatuation)

If you want to watch the mayor eat a corn dog, there is a video of his iconic corn dog-eating moment at the Iowa State Fair that is as cringe as it gets. (@marcusdipaola)

There’s a place in this world for masochism, there really is,” was the mayor’s answer on The Daily Show for if he’s just a sucker for punishment by being the city’s mayor and a presidential candidate. (Gothamist)

An Upper East Side plastic surgeon was arrested in Westchester this week when police found a car full of loaded assault rifles and ballistic armor in the course of responding to a domestic incident. (Gothamist)

Continuing the summer of hate, hundreds of anti-semitic flyers were scattered around the Halsey stop on the L on Wednesday. (QNS)

Say hello to a $10 cup of coffee that might be worth it. (Grub Street)

A list of how companies connected to Stephen Ross have attempted to distance themselves from the man who raised $12 million for President Trump during a single meal last Friday. (6sqft)

Real estate brokers are already finding loopholes around some of the state’s new rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

The city removed a round if applications from the middle and high school admissions process this week. This change doesn’t touch the mayor’s promise to get rid of the SHSAT. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you one of the people among the city’s 82,473 DNA profiles in its genetic database? (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo is looking to expand consequences for mass shooters that are motivated by hate. His proposal would classify killings on the basis of race, religion, creed, or sexual orientation as terrorism and punishable by life in prison without parole. (Gothamist)

16 superior breakfast sandwiches. (Eater)