The Briefly for August 16, 2019 – The “Everyone is Moving Slower Than We Used To” Edition

This weekend’s subway changes, a look at “environmental review,” real estate brokers are finding ways around rent reforms, de Blasio eats a corn dog and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

This weekend’s subways are seriously taking a break from normal service with disruptions on the 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, D, F, M, N, and the Staten Island Railway. (Subway Weekender)

What is “Environmental Review” and why NIMBY lawsuits cite it as a reason to kill projects like the Central Park West bike lane or 14 St busway. (Streetsblog)

A Bronx man will serve a three-to-nine-year prison sentence after pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter after fleeing the scene of a drunken car crash that killed Jose Cardoso. (Brooklyn Paper)

In the last 10 years, the average speed of a taxi below 60th St has gone from 9mph to 7mph, traffic speeds in midtown are down to 4.9 mph, subway and bus ridership declined, and it’s faster to get anywhere in midtown on a bike. Wherever we’re all going, we’re all getting there slower than ever, unless we’re on a bike. (Gothamist)

There will not be any charges against the driver who killed Aurilla Lawrence with a truck in a hit-and-run crash on February 28. It appears that if a driver claims they didn’t know they hit anyone, the NYPD won’t bring charges. (Streetsblog)

I believe we can all agree gentrification is inevitable, with both positive and negative outcomes,” says a man who is developing “co-living” real estate (read: dorm living for adults) in Bushwick who refuses to call himself a real estate developer. (NY Times)

Only for the brave: You can canoe the Gowanus Canal. (Brooklyn Based)

A guide to the city’s rental-finding websites. (Curbed)

Tribeca, NoLita, and Soho have remained the most expensive neighborhoods to live in for years, but Cobble Hill, Red Hook, and Grammercy Park are climbing that list quickly. (StreetEasy)

Everyone loves a list of hot spots unless it means a literal list of America’s hot spots where temperatures are rising dangerously fast and are past the point of “catastrophic effects.” (Patch)

Revel has added classes in August and September for people who feel trepidation about jumping on an electric moped for the first time. (Streetsblog)

Lobster rolls can be pretty expensive at times, but at $100, the roll at BK Lobster is “infused” with 24K gold. Thirsty for more gold? You can wash it down with wine with 23K gold flakes. (Eater)

Manero’s opens this weekend, the only slice shop on Mulberry St in Little Italy. If the name is familiar, it’s because it’s named for Tony Manero, John Travolta’s character in Saturday Night Fever and even features a double-decker slice in honor of the movie’s opening scene. (Gothamist)

State Attorney General Letitia James’s office has the Sackler Family, the seeming creators of America’s opioid crisis and founders and owners of Perdue Pharma, in its sights. The AG is investigating if the owners hid billions of dollars in an effort to hide profits. (NY Times)

There’s a connection between the rise of Uber and the popularity of late-night and overnight badminton. (Gothamist)

37 chefs give their neighborhood gems. (Grub Street)

Before the Vanderbilts were the Vanderbilts, there was Cornelius Vanderbilt, the man who built the family’s fortunes. In 1794 he was born 209 Port Richmond Ave. You won’t find a monument to the man on that spot, you’ll find No. 1 Chinese Takeout. (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after going for a run in Williamsburg, but also after you’ve had a shower and changed your clothes. (The Infatuation)

If you want to watch the mayor eat a corn dog, there is a video of his iconic corn dog-eating moment at the Iowa State Fair that is as cringe as it gets. (@marcusdipaola)

There’s a place in this world for masochism, there really is,” was the mayor’s answer on The Daily Show for if he’s just a sucker for punishment by being the city’s mayor and a presidential candidate. (Gothamist)

An Upper East Side plastic surgeon was arrested in Westchester this week when police found a car full of loaded assault rifles and ballistic armor in the course of responding to a domestic incident. (Gothamist)

Continuing the summer of hate, hundreds of anti-semitic flyers were scattered around the Halsey stop on the L on Wednesday. (QNS)

Say hello to a $10 cup of coffee that might be worth it. (Grub Street)

A list of how companies connected to Stephen Ross have attempted to distance themselves from the man who raised $12 million for President Trump during a single meal last Friday. (6sqft)

Real estate brokers are already finding loopholes around some of the state’s new rent reform laws. (Gothamist)

The city removed a round if applications from the middle and high school admissions process this week. This change doesn’t touch the mayor’s promise to get rid of the SHSAT. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Are you one of the people among the city’s 82,473 DNA profiles in its genetic database? (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo is looking to expand consequences for mass shooters that are motivated by hate. His proposal would classify killings on the basis of race, religion, creed, or sexual orientation as terrorism and punishable by life in prison without parole. (Gothamist)

16 superior breakfast sandwiches. (Eater)

The Briefly for April 17, 2019 – The “L Project Will Take Train Service From Suck to Blow” Edition

Amazon passed over Industry City before leaving Long Island City, the best bars in Nolita and Soho, Rosé Mansion returns this summer, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Long before Amazon decided not to build a headquarters in Long Island City, they decided not to build at Industry City. The details came out thanks to a Freedom of Information Law request and shows just how far the developers were willing to go to become Amazon City ahead of their billion dollar rezoning request. (Gothamist)

Here’s what you need to know about what’s open and what’s closed on Good Friday, Passover and Easter across the city. (Patch)

Here is the subway map and schedule for the L Project, which starts on April 26 and will take the trains service from suck to blow for the foreseeable future. (Gothamist)

Congratulations to the Bed-Stuy chess team for winning second place in the All-Girls National Chess Championship in Chicago last weekend. (Patch)

Squibb Bridge, the pedestrian bridge connecting Brooklyn Bridge Park and Brooklyn Heights will be demolished and rebuilt after opening in only 2013. The BQE Rehab won’t interfere with the bridge, meaning work can get started faster. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If Skynet ever becomes a reality, you can rest assured that the city’s government won’t play a hand in its creation. The mayor’s artificial intelligence task force has met 20 times in the last year and has accomplished, as far as reporting has shown, absolutely nothing but infighting and typical government inefficiencies. Like many of the mayor’s projects, there was no explicitly stated goals or scope to the work they are expected to achieve. (Curbed)

Close your eyes and picture a variety show in Bushwick. Good. Now turn up the saturation and volume past the point of being polite. If you’ve got a wild enough imagination, you’ve pictured something close to Eric Schmalenberger’s Blunderland Variety Show in its seventh year. (Bushwick Daily)

Hold on to your Instagram accounts, Rosé Mansion is returning this summer. (amNY)

In “nowhere is safe” news, the Fifth Avenue Apple Store has had a supposed month-long bed bug infestation. (Gothamist)

The MTA’s revamped plans for a completely new system of bus routes is still coming, but much like a city bus, it’s going to arrive later than you want it to. NYC Transit plans to finalize a plan by April 2020. (QNS)

The Lyrid meteor shower will hit its peak on April 22 and 23 and will happen from the 16th to 25th. Take a look upwards at night, you may see some shooting stars. (Patch)

New Jersey politicians think congestion pricing unfairly targets New Jerseyians. Maybe they’ve forgotten the point of congestion pricing is first and foremost to reduce the number of cars driving into Manhattan. (NY Times)

Buckets Of Xanax, no really we’re talking about literal hundreds of thousands of pills in buckets, were seized in a dark web raid that was using Manhattan businesses as return addresses. (Patch)

SPIN’s new ping pong lounge launches next week. The ping pong is free, but how’s the food? (Time Out)

The mayor, unlike some other politicians, has already released his 2018 taxes. Nothing terribly exciting, but he gets credit for doing it. (Politico)

Jumaane Williams, who is both the city’s public advocate and also captain obvious, said that the Hudson Yards is “not for a majority of this city.” (amNY)

The state’s legislature is pushing forward with a bill that would ban religious exemptions for the measles-vaccine for any child attending schools in New York state. Rockland County’s outbreak has infected 186 and Brooklyn’s has infected 259. The World Health Organization labeled measles as one of the 10 largest threats to global health in 2019. (Downtown Express)

An interview with Dr. Jan Kaminsky, Director of Education at Rainbow Health Consulting, and is also developing a National LGBTQ+ Nurses Association. (Gothamist)

The best bars in Soho and Nolita. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for January 2, 2019 – The “Which Subway Stations Party the Hardest?” Edition

McNally Jackson isn’t moving, the Continental is close (or is it), the PATH trains lose $400 million/year, the city’s first homicide of 2019, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

It took 4 hours and thirty minutes, but NYC’s first homicide of 2019 happened in East New York in Brooklyn. (NY Post)

Throw that Christmas tree into a wood chipper! You can leave it on the curb too, but that’s not nearly as much fun. (Gothamist)

Stop throwing your unused prescription medication in the toilet. The Drug Take Back Act requires chain and mail-order pharmacies to provide safe ways to dispose of your medication. (Waste Advantage Mag)

2nd Ave and Bedford Ave party hardest of any subway stations in the city. (Camden Willeford)

When it comes to offering new and modern methods of transportation, the west coast is kicking our ass. (NY Times)

Will Kirsten Gillibrand, Michael Bloomberg, or Governor Cuomo run for president and 33 more questions for New York politics in 2019. (Gotham Gazette)

At his inauguration on Ellis Island, Governor Cuomo placed New York in opposition to President Trump and his policies. (NY Times)

Watch Governor Cuomo’s entire 2019 inauguration address. (Global News)

Congratulations to The Court Square Blog for five years and over 2,000 stories of coverage. (The Court Square Blog)

The East Village dive Continental closed for good on New Year’s Eve, but a sign in the window promises (or threatens, depending) a return in the neighborhood soon. (EV Grieve)

PATH trains lose $400 million a year and there is no possible hope to close that gap. (NY Times)

McNally Jackson Books will not be moving, despite making a big stink about rising rents three months ago. (Bowery Boogie)

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