The Briefly for May 6, 2020 – The “Getting Punched in the Head Feels Excessive” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Everything you need to know about NYC’s subway overnight shut down, The Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act, New York wants to “Reimagine Education,” & more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 55˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

Last night was the start of the four-hour subway shut down for cleaning. The MTA will be testing UV lights and anti-microbial products after each car is disinfected. While the trains are shut down buses will be operating for free. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The overnight shut down of the subways, explained. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

The Times chronicled the historic night one of the MTA’s first-ever planned subway shutdown. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Is the end of 24-hour subway service? No, according to the governor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Another day, another video of NYPD officer punching a black New Yorker in the head during a social distancing arrest. “A punch should not be assumed to be excessive force.” -Dermot Shea, NYPD Commissioner. The person being arrested appeared to be handcuffed, on the ground, and had three officers on top of them when punched. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The 10 best bike shops in New York City. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

We’ve got an Aerogarden in the kitchen with some cherry tomatoes, how’s your quarantine garden going? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Like many of us, Andy Warhol bounced around the city, and so did where he did his work, The Factory. A look at where Andy Warhol lived and worked in NYC. (Laura Vecsey for StreetEasy)

Looking to work on your art in quarantine? The Metropolitan Museum of Art is offering a free botanical drawing class online. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn is “ill equipped” to identify cases of COVID-19 and stop the disease from spreading among its nearly 1,700 detainees, according to a doctor who visited the federal jail last month. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

Mariah Kennedy-Cuomo, the governor’s daughter, made the suggestion that not everyone wants to listen to Governor Cuomo tell them what to do, so the state is launching a competition for New Yorkers to submit videos explaining why its important to wear masks in public. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

It’s National Nurses Week from May 6-12 commemorating Florence Nightingale’s work in Crimea in 1854, and it couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time to honor the nurses in the city and across the country. (Isabelle Bousquette for QNS)

More information on the possible Covid-19-relate illness that has stricken over a dozen children in the city, from ages 2-15. If you have a child with a rash, abdominal pain, vomiting, or diarrhea, please contact a doctor.(Amanda Eisenberg and Erin Curkin for Politico)

Welcome2TheBronx has started a fundraising campaign to continue its coverage of the Bronx. The site has been around since 2009 and has become one of the more important voices when it comes to covering and changing the narrative about the Bronx. (Welcome2TheBronx)

There wasn’t much good news to be found in City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s analysis of the city’s 2021 fiscal budget, which starts on July 1. The budget gap is looking to total about $8.7 billion and with an unemployment rate of 22% this quarter, the city is finding itself dug into a pretty deep hole. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A last-minute NYC mother’s day gift guide. Yes, during a pandemic, Wednesday is the last minute when it comes to Mother’s Day. (The Infatuation)

Video: These sidewalk tents are a pretty good way to keep your social distance. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is turning to The Gates Foundation to help “reimagine education” for the state of New York as we continue forward with our new normal. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Over 1,200 independent music venues and promoters have banded together to form the National Independent Venue Association, or NIVA, with the goal of “securing financial support to preserve the national ecosystem of independent venues and promoters.” There is a letter template you can use to send to your state and city officials to show support for the city’s independent music venues. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A worker at Amazon’s Staten Island, New York, fulfillment center has died of Covid-19, the company confirmed. Workers at the facility, called JFK8, have been calling for greater safety precautions since early March. (Josh Dzieza for The Verge)

A look into how The Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act, proposed by Representative Ilhan Omar, may affect you. (Localize Labs)

All hail Hakki Akdeniz, the pizza champ, for distributing pizzas and snacks to those in need on the Bowery over the weekend. (Bowery Boogie)

It’s looking like a rainy set of days ahead, but when it gets warm here is where to get freshly made ice cream and pies in NYC. (Leah Rosenzweig for Eater)

Thanks to Jenny for today’s featured photo from the Upper West Side!

The Briefly for April 30, 2020 – The “I Will Report You To 311 For This!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Alternatives for grocery delivery, Governor Cuomo’s quizzical piece of art, 40 inexpensive takeout suggestions, IKEA Rego Park’s opening delayed, and more

Today – Low: 53˚ High: 57˚
Rain until morning, starting again in the evening.

Waiting for an antibody test is the new waiting for a table at brunch. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

One of Brooklyn’s best places to go for peace and quiet is now closed to the public. Floyd Bennett Field is being used to store MTA buses, cutting off access to the Gateway National Recreation Area, Floyd Bennett Gardens Association’s access to their gardens, and some of the city’s best spots for biking. (Gabriel Sandoval and Jose Martinez for The City)

Andrew Yang is suing New York state for canceling the Democratic presidential primary, trying to get it reinstated. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

“I am not happy at all, and this doesn’t have to do with what candidate you are supporting.” –AOC on the primary’s cancelation. (Juan Manuel Benitez for NY1)

Residential noise complaints to 311 have gone up by 22% during everyone’s quarantine. I’m sorry, I’m trying to perfect my tap dancing. I’ll try to keep it down. (Charles Woodman for Patch)

A look inside the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center and how it’s kept itself, and the city’s food supply chain, going during the pandemic. (Gary He for Eater)

VIDEO: “The Central Park,” a mashup of scenes from movies in or around Central Park. (Flaming Pablum)

Major League Baseball continues to think of how to play the remainder of the season, whenever that might start. The latest idea disbands the American and National Leagues in favor of three geographic-based leagues and highlights local rivalries, giving us a season’s worth of Subway Series games. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The cover of the April 15 New Yorker sums life up pretty well right now. An interview with Chris Ware about “Still Life.” (Françoise Mouly for The New Yorker)

Sara Erenthal’s work, which uses the city’s trash as a canvas for years, has been featured multiple times in The Briefly’s daily photos (including one claiming “our president is an absolute piece of shit, which I got an angry email about). Here’s an interview with Erenthal about her art and experience creating it. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A series of interviews with N.Y.U. Langone Health nurses, who bear the burden and weight of the city’s sick and dying. (David Gonzalez and Sinna Nasseri for NY Times)

“You know what it spells? It spells love.” When Governor Cuomo unveiled a wall of masks, I spent a few moments actually searching for the word “LOVE” within it. He was speaking metaphorically and I’m glad no one was around to watch me lean in and squint to try to see it. I wasn’t the only one confused. (Kathleen Culliton for

Go beyond Amazon Prime and Instacart. 10 grocery delivery services that are locally focused. (amNewYork Metro)

The funeral in Williamsburg is putting the NYPD and city officials in a tough spot. More than 2,000 Satmar Hasidic Jewish residents flooded the streets, despite an attempt to work with the NYPD to socially distance, endangering everyone involved. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea stated it bluntly: there will be “zero tolerance” for gatherings like this in the future because the crowds are “putting my cops at risk.” (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

“I have no regrets about calling out this danger and saying we’re going to be dealing with it very, very aggressively” -Mayor de Blasio on future enforcement of social distancing after the funeral. (Nina Golgowski for HuffPost)

CitiBike is expanding into upper Manhattan and the Bronx starting the week of May 4 with 100 new docking stations. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

A map of the Bronx’s new CitiBike locations. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The city will offer COVID-19 antibody tests to 150,000 health care workers and first responders to determine whether they’ve been infected. The Department of Defense will also be setting up a program to treat health care workers for “combat stress.” Chirlane McCray is in charge of the mental health program. Hopefully, unlike her past work with ThriveNYC, this will be proven to be effective. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Throughout May, the city will transfer 1,000 New Yorkers living in city homeless shelters every week to vacant hotel rooms, according to the mayor. The city has approximately 30,000 empty hotel rooms. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The YMCA launched YMCA @ Home, free workout classes. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is offering 200 exhibition catalogs from its archives for free, dating back to 1936. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Last weekend you baked Junior’s cheesecake, this weekend are you ready for another challenge? Here’s the recipe for Magnolia Bakery’s iconic cupcakes. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

A closer look at the MTA’s new code of conduct that is written with the explicit intention of clearing homeless New Yorkers from trains and enable daily disinfecting of each car. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

IKEA Rego Park’s store opening has been pushed back to the fall. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

Dozens of bodies — many of which were the remains of coronavirus victims – were seen being loaded from several U-Haul trucks to a refrigerator truck outside of a Brooklyn funeral home on Wednesday. (Todd Maisel and Jessica Parks for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Samuel Hargress Jr., owner of Paris Blues in Harlem and “the soul ambassador of, that culture of community.” (Steven Kurutz for NY Times)

Vox Media furloughed 9% of its staff and will be making Curbed a part of New York Magazine. Starting May 1, Curbed will be completely furloughed for three months. There is a GoFundMe for the Vox staff who have been furloughed. (Vox Media Furlough Fund)

Looking to donate food to the city’s essential workers? Here are eight ways to deliver food without having to leave your couch. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

40 inexpensive dining destinations still open, straight from Robert Sietsema’s inexpensive dining column. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Natalie for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 23, 2020 – The “No One Cares Why You’re Leaving New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The City Council pushes forward with its open streets plan, an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights,” standout sushi takeout and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 53˚
Light rain overnight.

Despite the Governor’s orders, some hospitals are not allowing one support person in labor and delivery settings. (Virginia Breen for The City)

7 things you didn’t know about Central Park. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A look at the positive contributions of David Penepent, a mortuary sciences professor at SUNY Canton, who is helping with the transportation, care, and cremation of New York City’s dead during this pandemic. Very often you’ll hear about how bad of a job someone is doing in a moment of crisis, this is the exact opposite. (Alexandra E. Petri for NY Times)

15% of pregnant women in NYC tested positive for COVID-19 in a limited study in Manhattan over a two week period. The findings may give a better look into what’s happening with the general population and highlights a need for universal testing. (Bobby Cuza for NY1)

No cares about your “why I’m leaving New York” essay. That goes double during a pandemic. Just leave and take your guilt about leaving with you. (Claire Fallon for HuffPost)

A “plaque” was put up in Park Slope near Methodist Hospital by an unknown guerilla street artist honoring “grocery workers, nurses, hospital staff, doctors, mail carriers, immigrant laborers, and other true heroes” of the pandemic. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The City Council is looking for ways to resuscitate the city’s summer jobs program. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson pushed a 75-mile open street plan forward on Wednesday. Johnson and Council Member Carlina Rivera dismissed the mayor’s concerns about the plan as irrelevant. The mayor has recently blamed the failure of his open streets plan on New Yorkers. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The City Council introduced an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights” on Wednesday, which would require large employers to provide additional protections and hazard pay to those hourly workers helping the city continue to operate during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Christopher Robbins and Sydney Perreira for Gothamist)

Looking to make your Friday night Zoom hangout feel a little more regular? Check out Virtual Cheers, which in return for a donation to the staff of the bar will give you a photo of the bar of your choice. (Beth Landman for Eater)

The organizers of the city’s Pride parades have decided to collaborate to take their events virtual. Global PRide is June 27, but the city has already canceled all public events in June. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

What’s the first thing you’re gonna eat when quarantine is over? 21 famous New Yorkers on the first thing they’re gonna eat. (Alyssa Shelasky for Grub Street)

The mayor has continued to talk publicly about what it will take to reopen the city, including a “Trace and Test” program, which will move people who test positive into isolation, possibly in one of the 11,000 hotel rooms the city has set aside. Right now the city is aiming for 400,000 test kits per month, which isn’t nearly enough for the city’s 8.5 million people. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mayor Bloomberg volunteered to develop a contact tracing program for the tri-state area. Bloomberg Philanthropies has also made a financial contribution of $10.5 million through the Bloomberg School fo Health at John’s Hopkins. This is separate from the Mayor de Blasio’s plan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is looking to double the number of COVID-19 tests in the state, from 20,000 to 40,000. The 40,000 is “ambitious,” in his own words, with the state’s 300 labs working 24/7 to meet the demand for 20,000. At 40,000 a day, it’ll only take 13 and a half years to test the whole state. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

Foot Locker, H&M, Old Navy, Nordstrom, Party City, and The Gap, welcome to the non-rent paying party. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The underground, hydroponic farm on Worth St, Farm.One, is still operating, but its produce was originally intended for bars and restaurants. Now they are opening up orders to the public. (Tribeca Citizen)

This is a celebration that has to happen.” -Mayor de Blasio on the Fourth of July fireworks. Fourth of July is six days after NYC Pride was scheduled to end. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Bodega-inspired streetwear. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The MTA’s 250 construction projects are moving forward, albeit with some new safety precautions, being deemed essential. With so few people riding the trains, this may be the optimal time to get that work done.(Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Everyone’s made a mistake when ordering groceries, especially now, but what do you do with ten bunches of bananas or 1,200 coffee filters? (Madison Malone Kircher for Grub Street)

Where to get Mexican takeout and delivery in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

50 things the RESY staff misses most about New York. (RESY)

An interactive map of where to avoid where sidewalks make social distancing impossible. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Now remains a great time to adopt a dog or a cat. The Briefly home has two amazing toy poodles, Scooter and Pepper, and we couldn’t be happier. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

It’s like “ballet or break dancing on a bike.” Meet BMX champ Matthias Dandois, who is doing tricks inside his Tribeca apartment. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

Here is the recipe for Junior’s famous cheesecake from scratch. Now I know what I’m doing to try (and fail) this weekend. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Two NY housecats have tested positive for COVID-19, as well as four tigers and three lions in the Bronx Zoo. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Meet Jennifer Marino-Bonventre, an English teacher who is bringing some joy to the city with some fantastic sidewalk chalk drawings. (Debora Fougere for NY1)

The Times found out what the rest of us already knew: New Yorkers want cheap wine and a lot of cheap wine. (Alix Strauss for NY Times)

New York City, a city of winners, and Boston, which is a different city, have different sports teams, different coffee choices, different clam chowders, and two genetically different types of pigeons. (Joshua Sokol for NY Times)

22 standout sushi spots still open for takeout and delivery. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Eater)

Thanks to reader Melissa for today’s featured photo from the East Village.