The Briefly for June 26, 2020 – The “Welcome to Manhattan, $20 Please” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The CBGB Caucus, phase three could start on July 6, vendors return to Rockaway Beach, Harlem gets a Black Lives Matter street mural, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 74˚ High: 86˚

2020 is the year that everyone wants to start selling nutcrackers. (Margot Boyer-Dry for NY Times)

Without federal assistance, the MTA is leaving nothing in the table when it comes to attempting to make up for a combined $15 billion of lost revenue over two years. Already discussed are the disastrous combinations of non‐personnel expense reductions, reductions in force, fare and toll increases, service reductions, and “long‐term deficit financing.” (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

With the MTA’s trouble at the front of mind, let’s not forget that the city is waiting on federal approval for congestion pricing to enter Manhattan. A Cornell University study found that a $20 toll could reduce Manhattan’s traffic by 40%, greenhouse gas emission could be cut by 15%, and ridership on mass transit would increase by 6%. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA will rename two Brooklyn subway stops to include the name of Medgar Evers College, thanks to legislation from Assembly Member Diana Richardson and State Senator Zellnor Myrie. The new stops will be named Franklin Avenue-Medgar Evers College and President Street-Medgar Evers College. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

One of the hardest-hit industries during the pandemic is dog walkers. As life slowly edges towards normal and dog adoptions have spiked, can dog walker rebound? (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

City Councilmember Ritchie Torres has a sizable lead in the 15th Congressional District in the South Bronx. If that lead persists through the counting of absentee ballots, he could be the first out gay Afro-Latinx member of Congress. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

The NYPD promoted three people of color to chief positions. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

David Afanador, the cop who allegedly put a man in an illegal chokehold in Queens days after it became illegal across the state, turned himself in and was charged with attempted aggravated strangulation and strangulation in the second degree. If convicted, he could face seven years in prison. (NY1)

Identifying 10 streets that would be ideal to close for outdoor dining. (Eater)

22 branches of the NYPL, QPL, and BPL will be opening on July 13 for grab-and-go service. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Grub Street floats an interesting idea: Should this be the end of the traditional menu? Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

We’re five days into phase two, which means the city is turning its eyes towards phase three, which includes basketball courts, dog runs, indoor restaurant service, nail salons, massage therapists, and other personal care services. The city is on pace to hit phase three on July 6. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

City Councilmembers Justin Brannan and Keith Powers have formed the “CBGB Caucus” as a way to help support independent music venues that remain closed and will remain closed through phase three, across the city. In a letter to the city’s Congressional Delegation, they outline support for a benefit for venues that have been completely unable to open due to the pandemic and emergency unemployment benefits for their workers. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

The New-York Historical Society will, with approval from the city, be opening on August 14 with an outdoor exhibition called “Hope Wanted: New York City Under Quarantine“. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

As stores slowly reopen, there’s a movement to preserve the protest art that adorned storefronts around SoHo. (NY1)

It’s less than reassuring to know that in the week of a primary, the NYC Board of Elections Director was fined for violating the city’s ethics law. The center of the violation is a hotel stay in 2018 that was paid for by Election Systems & Software while he was serving on their board, a company that the city purchases election machines and supplies from. He resigned from his position with ES&S later in 2018. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The local election to watch this fall will be Trump-supporting Republican challenger Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis trying to unseat Democratic incumbent Rep. Max Rose. Only a few days out from the primaries and both are on the attack. Rose called Malliotakis “a fraud who represents everything we hate about our politics.” (Rose Adams for amNewyork Metro)

Farewell to the Way Station, the Doctor Who-themed bar in Prospect Heights, who will not be regenerating after the pandemic. (Serena Dai for Eater)

10 chefs and restauranteurs discuss how they feel about reopening. (The Infatuation)

The New York City Council voted Thursday to legalize e-bikes and e-scooters for use on city streets, forcing the mayor to confront a reversal of his ill-conceived and poorly-executed crackdown of electric bikes. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Take a walk around the Rink at Rockefeller Center and it will become impossible to not see the 100 Pride flags flying around the plaza as a part of Rockefeller Center’s celebration of World Pride Day. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

If you can’t get out and do a socially-distant tour of LGBTQ+ landmarks across the city the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project and CyArk created a 3D virtual tour. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A look at Attorney General William Barr’s attempt to undermine New York’s federal prosecutors. (Benjamin Weiser, Ben Protess, Katie Benner and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

New York is releasing $65 million in federal money to help preschools and daycare centers reopen after the coronavirus forced many to close down. The preschools and daycares say it isn’t enough. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Harlem will be getting a Black Lives Matter street mural on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard between 125th and 127th Streets. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

A look at the positive impact the city’s use of hotel rooms as homeless shelters can have. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

It won’t be happening this weekend, but along with lifeguards, food vendors are coming back to Rockaway Beach on July 1. (Alexander Jusdanis for Bedford + Bowery)

28 NYC restaurants with new outdoor dining. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chris for today’s photo of the new VBallentine mural in Crown Heights.

The Briefly for August 19, 2019 – The “Daniel Pantaleo Lied About The Chokehold” Edition

The MTA’s board is as functional as their trains, the rice cooker guy is caught, Nutcracker summer, finding hidden parks and gardens, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late-night subway work is relatively light this week, but still inconvenient if you’re on the 2, 3, 7, A, E, N or Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

Registration for the 2019 Daffodil Project is available. The Daffodil Project was created post-9/11 to create a living memorial to September 11 city-wide by giving out half a million bulbs a year to be planted in public spaces. (New Yorkers for Parks)

It’s been 14 years since the renovations at the Rugby branch of the Brooklyn Public Library started and we’re still a year away from seeing it completed. (The City)

Jose Alzorriz is the 19th cyclist to be killed by a driver on the city’s streets this year. A petition with over 1,000 signatures is calling for a traffic safety study of Coney Island Avenue following his death. (amNY)

Judge Rosemarie Maldonado’s ruling of Daniel Pantaleo’s involvement in the death of Eric Garner is that he was “untruthful” when he said he didn’t use a chokehold and its use was “a gross deviation from the standard of conduct established for a New York City police officer.” So what now? The city waits for commissioner James O’Neill to hopefully fire Pantaleo. (NY Times)

CitiBike is celebrating the one year anniversary of its Reduced Fare Bike Share program with a free month of membership to NYCHA residents and SNAP recipients starting today. (amNY)

In order to accommodate longer buses, the MTA is cutting nine stops from the B38 bus line, which services from Ridgewood in Queens to Downtown Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Paper)

The history and tradition of opening fire hydrants to cool off. (NY Times)

Two things of note: There is a Coca-Cola Freestyle competition and Queen’s Danuta Rybak is one of the five finalists. (QNS)

17 lighthouses to check out before the summer is over. (Untapped Cities)

This weekend is a “Clear the Shelters” weekend, where the ASPCA will be waiving adoption fees for cats and dogs on Saturday. It’s time to get that cat or dog you’ve been thinking about. (Gothamist)

The six best neighborhoods in Brooklyn for a budget. (StreetEasy)

Sixth Ave in Chelsea is deadly for pedestrians and cyclists. A pedestrian, hit by a driver last week, died of her injuries. Over 130 people have died on city streets this year, up from 108 at this time last year. (Streetsblog)

This week’s list of restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health. (Patch)

The MTA is removing bus schedules from its bus stops in an attempt to save money. Replacing them is a sign to call 511 or download the MTA’s app. Sixteen politicians from Queens are pushing back, pointing out that access to a cell phone isn’t always a guarantee and the $550,000 saved on bus schedules seems like a drop in the bucket compared to the $42 billion deficit expected by 2022. (amNY)

If you love seeing rats, Brooklyn is your borough. (Bushwick Daily)

Could Tiffany Cabán’s big to win the Democratic nomination for Queens DA have ended with her nomination without the NY Working Families Party? (The Indypendent)

If you missed the Perseid meteor shower, Scott Segler made a time-lapse. (Viewing NYC)

The Brooklyn War Memorial (and nearby bathrooms) will be undergoing renovations starting in November. The monument has been closed for 27 years. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Blue Point Brewing Co is opening a literal underground brewpub. Granted they’ll only have a two-barrel system, but it’s an A for effort. The Hull is expected to open in October. (amNY)

11 people in the city have been hospitalized and treated for “severe lung trauma” after vaping with products THC and nicotine. This isn’t exclusive to New York, similar illnesses have been reported nationwide. (Gothamist)

We may not have jetpacks, but liquid nitrogen, hydraulic presses, and centrifuges are all being used to make cocktails. (Viewing NYC)

A vegan guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The cast of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is raising funds for the homeless youth of the city through Covenant House with a “sleep out” tonight. It’s not about simulating the experience, though Rachel Brosnahan and some cast-mates will be sleeping on 34th St, but raising funds and awareness. Donations can be made at sleepout.org. (amNY)

The MTA’s board is about as functional as the MTA’s trains and buses, as a recent meeting devolved into a shouting match between two members. (amNY)

You can tell your uncle to stop posting on Facebook about Jeffrey Epstein’s death because it was determined to be suicide by the city’s medical examiner. A look at the last days of Jeffrey Epstein. (NY Times)

Video: Watch the boring machine break through the end of the Delaware Aqueduct tunnel repair as the Department of Environmental Protection closes in on a $1 billion repair project. (Gothamist)

A look at Dexter Park, a 20,000 baseball stadium in Woodhaven which was home to the Bushwicks, a semi-pro baseball team part of the Inter-city Baseball Association. (QNS)

The man in the video circulated by the NYPD in connection to the bomb-scare rice cookers left around Manhattan on Friday, 25-year-old Larry K. Griffin II, was taken into custody on Saturday. (NY Times)

Seven Republicans are rushing to lose an election to Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Politico)

A map of the city’s hidden parks and secret gardens. (Curbed)

This summer is the Hot Girl Summer, but every summer in New York City is Nutcracker Summer. (NY Times)

The Briefly for June 5, 2018 – Fixing the Subways, Hipster Racist ID’d, Nutcrackers, Pianos Returns, and More

New York City Transit’s new head, Andy Byford, has an plan that calls for spending $19 billion on improving capacity and accessibility for the subways. “The Fast Forward Plan” is a ten year plan that replaces most of the signals and adding step-free stations and elevators to many stations. Of course, the city’s transit chief doesn’t work for the MTA, so these ideas are just ideas for the moment. Cynthia Nixon has a similar plan for fixing the subway, which include congestion pricing, a millionaire’s tax, and imposing fees on heavy polluters.

It’s summertime, which means Nutcrackers. What are the origins of the Nutcracker? Atlas Obscura traces them back to an Upper West Side restaurant.

A proposal from City Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Mayor Bill de Blasio will allow adults to change their gender to “X” on their birth certificates. This option would become available to adults, but would not apply to newborns. There is currently an “undetermined or unknown” option available. NYC currently recognizes 31 genders.

The New York Post identified local racist Chris Giardina as the 29-year-old man caught on video throwing around the N word and other racist terms outside of Bushwick’s House of Yes. Giardina was fired from his job at MySpace NYC (it’s not THAT MySpace.)

Sanitation Salvage, the trash-hauling company who was responsible for two deaths in the last six monthsand a host of safety violations, is the subject of a ProPublica and Voice of America exposé. The company’s license has not been revoked.

Filming Around Town: John Wick 3 continues shooting at 42nd and Lexington, The Punisher is in Greenpoint, Ray Donovan is at W 133rd and 12th, Michelle Williams’s latest After the Wedding is at 4th and 2nd and The Marvelous Mrs Maisel is at Riverside Dr and W 120th.

Long Island City’s development boom is unstoppable, and Curbed has a map.

Woodlawn Cemetery is turning dying and dead trees into works of art.

The mayor’s proposed overhaul of the admissions process for the city’s specialized high schools is going to be an enormous fight. His two-part plan aims at making the process more fair, citing that while 70% of the city’s population are black or Latino, they only make up about 10% of students at these high schools. He wants to scrap the SHSAT (Specialize High Schools Admissions Test) and expand the Discovery program. The Discovery program would set aside 20% of seats in these schools for low-income students who just missed the test cut-off.

Sing for Hope’s pianos are returning across the city. This year there are 50 pianos that will live across the city before heading to public schools in the fall.


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