The Briefly for May 28, 2019 – The “Anatomy of an Everything Bagel” Edition

Not even Mayor de Blasio’s fundraisers want him to be president, the NYC Ferry was a disaster over the weekend, the 2021 election is going to be wild, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes are minimal but hit the 1, 2, 4, 6, and A trains. (Subway Weekender)

In exchange for a weekend of pretty killer weather, we’re in for quite a bit of rain this week. (amNY)

An in-depth, detailed analysis of Grand Central Terminal’s architecture and design. (Viewing NYC)

The newest NYC restaurants, including a new restaurant in the West Village from the 2019 James Beard award winner for best NYC chef. (amNY)

The “everything” on an everything bagel: poppy, sesame, caraway, garlic, onion, and sea salt. That and the rest of the bagel recipe. (amNY)

The Bushwick Book Club is pretty much everything you’d imagine a Bushwick acid trip dream of a book club might be. (Bushwick Daily)

All 3,000 NYCHA elevators are out of service, on average, at least once each month and the average outage has doubled in length in recent years. The NYCHA has 10 inspectors to cover 3,000 elevators. (The Real Deal)

Rents have increased near 314 subway stations, with the Classon Ave stop on the G, Simpson St on the 25 and Bergen St on the 2/3 coming out on top. (Patch)

Queen Andrea’s work on the Bowery Mural Wall started over the weekend. her bright colors and typography work is already coming through. (EV Grieve)

A robbery suspect jumped off the FDR off-ramp to evade police but ended up dying from his injuries. (Gothamist)

Will a boozy Taco Bell ruin Chelsea? So far, there have been no complaints. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio counts being irritating to President Trump as a positive quality. The president isn’t the only person that finds him irritating. (Politico)

Delia’s is back, JNCOs are on their way back, Jagged Little Pill is on Broadway, and McMansions haven’t died yet. (the Real Deal)

Who is the genius that didn’t think to expand the NYC Ferry options for Memorial Day weekend, the first big beach weekend of the year? Whoever it was, they should be fired. (Pix 11)

How pervasive has Airbnb become in the city? This visualization showing growth over the last eleven years should be enlightening. (r/dataisbeautiful / Imap14)

Who wants the mayor to be president? We already know about the amazing 76% of New Yorkers polled that said no. His friends said no. What about the people who gave $5,000 to his political action committee? The New York Times asked 35 of those people and only five said yes. (NY Times)

The 2021 city election is going to be a wild one. Most of the city council, the mayor, all borough presidents, and comptroller will be hitting term-limits, and over 500 candidates are expected to step up in the process. (Gotham Gazette)

In order to avoid looking like tourists, we keep our heads down, focusing on the slow walking people in front of us. Occasionally it pays to look up, or else we’ll miss details like the sea-horses above 25 Broadway, part of Steamship Row. (Forgotten New York)

Where to drink when you want to learn about wine. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for May 13, 2019 – The “The Thing Is, I’m Not Sorry” Edition

The mayor announces the city will work more closely with ICE, CitiBike’s electric bikes aren’t coming back until the fall, these kittens need adopting, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes hit the 4, 6, 7, A, E, N, and Q trains. (Subway Changes)

It’s been seven years since Hurricane Sandy and the city has only spent 54% of the $14.7 billion in the federal aid set aside for recovery. City Comptroller Scott Stringer blames federal bureaucracy but also puts blame on City Hall’s lack of urgency to protect itself against the next storm. (Curbed)

The Times is getting in on the de Blasio anti-endorsement train. (NY Times)

10 quiet places to escape the city’s noises. (Untapped Cities)

A look back to Bertha Heyman, a swindler of men in New York from the 1880s. Even from prison, she swindled a man out of his life’s savings. (Atlas Obscura)

Anna Sorokin, from prison, said she’d be “lying to you and to everyone else and to myself if I said I was sorry for anything.” Maybe the next step is conning someone out of their life’s savings. (NY Times)

A walk through Brooklyn’s Dekalb Market is an exercise in bathing yourself in the chaotic glow of multiple colors and shapes of neon lights which has a distinct “city” feel. The Times looks back with photos at when neon lights shone with hope and glamour and gave New York and Times Square a visual identity. (NY Times)

Are you ready for a summer of floating LED billboards at city beaches? (Gothamist)

Some of us love birds but don’t have the patience for bird watching. Maybe that’s part of the Central Park Mandarin Duck’s appeal. If you can’t be bothered with finding the hot duck, there’s Nicolas Holiber’s Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project, which is bringing ten sculptures of native NY birds in danger of going extinct to the medians of Broadway. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA’s 7 Train work is completed, with the trains programmed for optimal cruising speed and increases the number of trains per hour during peak service from 25-27 to 29. (Sunnyside Post)

The first electric unicycle explosion happened near Union Square, which started a two-alarm fire. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including a triple-digit violation, which really takes effort. (Patch)

22 bars where you can actually find a seat. (The Infatuation)

This year’s NYC Century Bike Tour will be the last. Transportation Alternatives’ strategy has changed over the last 30 years and so has riding a bicycle in the city. With about 10% of all New Yorkers riding a bike several times a month, biking no longer needs to be established as a legitimate form of transportation. (Streetsblog)

“The vast, vast majority of undocumented people in this city know their city government is protecting them, respecting them, supporting them.” Mayor de Blasio announced the city will be working even more closely cooperate with ICE. (Patch)

A guide to all of the reasons that the mayor is running for president, like being habitually late, he gets driven to the gym on a daily basis to avoid taking the train, and… no one can make this guy look like a viable candidate. (Gothamist)

16 of the coolest hotel pools in the city, including some open to the public. (Curbed)

Imagine the terror of one million New Yorkers moving on the same day. That day used to be May 1 when almost all of the city’s leases were up. Imagine the equivalent of a million New Yorkers all moving on the same day. (CityMetric)

Where to go drinking with your dog on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

One of the most prolific members of the online white supremacist community was ID’d as 30-year-old Flushing resident Joseph Jordan, according to an investigation from the watchdog group Southern Poverty Law Center. (Gothamist)

The governor is calling for investigations into possible widespread fraud at the MTA over the misreporting of overtime. If you’re looking for a blow-by-blow of politicians, transit officials, and labor representatives pointing fingers and shift blame, there was an “emergency” MTA board meeting where labor representatives and Governor Cuomo’s MTA appointees pointed fingers, shifted blame, and of course, got nothing accomplished. (amNY & Second Ave Sagas)

It’s the start of kitten season in the city, which means the ASPCA is expecting 1,500 kittens from May to October. They are looking for people willing to foster kittens and offers training, food, supplies, and support. Plus “I’m fostering kittens right now” will look very good on your Tinder profile. (Gothamist)

Video: Peter Wallker dissects preconceived notions about the dangers of “cyclists.” (The Guardian)

Something must be seriously screwed up with CitiBike’s pedal-assisted bikes. They were pulled from the streets in April for a problem with the brakes and they won’t be seen again until the fall. (Streetsblog)

Meet the NYCHA plumber that earned over $200,000 in overtime last year. (The City)

The city’s top 14 burgers, from The Daily Meal’s list of the best 101 in the nation. (Patch)

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The Briefly for May 6, 2019 – The “Oh No, He’s Actually Going to Run for President, Isn’t He” Edition

The mayor’s Vision Zero program is beginning to fail, the best tacos, Jagged Little Pill plans to bring people to theaters, teens attacked by acid, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway changes and diversions are minimally awful. (Subway Changes)

A review of Decade of Fire, playing at the Metrograph, which tackles the topic of the burning of the Bronx in the 70s and the organizations that rallied to rebuild when no one else would. (Curbed)

Oh god. He’s actually going to run for President, isn’t he? (Splinter)

How to spend 12 hours on Governors Island. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jagged Little Pill, which may actually be a bad album, is coming to Broadway on November 3 at the Broadhurst Theatre. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The 10 oldest libraries in the city and their secret histories. (Untapped Cities)

Some teens threw a raucous party in the basement of an NYCHA development. The party ended when someone poured an acid-like liquid onto them from above. (NY Times)

Some people are happy with laundry machines in their building. Others get a million dollar yacht, who Rolls-Royces, a Lamborghini, a Hamptons house rental for a summer, and courtside Nets season tickets. Yes, all of those amenities are for one apartment. Welcome to the wildest luxuries for city homes. (Patch)

RIP Lew Fidler. Fidler was a Brooklyn politician, who was a champion for homeless youth in the city council, the environment, and LGBTQ youth. (Politico)

The top twelve brunch spots in the city. Let this serve as a reminder if you want to go anywhere for brunch this weekend. Mother’s Day approaches. (Patch)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants and bars. (amNY)

Scenes from the Union Square cannabis parade and rally from Saturday. (EV Grieve)

It took six years, but the Office of Emergency Management has unveiled lower Manhattan’s solution against a Hurricane Sandy-like storm has arrived. They’ll use… sandbags. Really big sandbags. This took six years. (NY Times)

Margaritaville is a state of mind, but it’s also going to be a resort on the corner of 40th and Seventh Ave. (New York YIMBY)

Katz’s has survived New York since 1888 and New Yorkers have survived Katz’s enormous sandwiches for just as long. I’ll have what she’s having. (Food Insider)

Mark your calendars, November 9 will be Wu-Tang Clan Day, and to celebrate you’ll be able to go to the corner of Targee Street and Vanderbilt Avenue in Staten Island, which is the Wu-Tang Clan District as of this weekend. (The Root)

RIP Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown, who died over the weekend due to Parkinson’s disease complications. Brown was the Queens District Attorney for nearly thirty years and had been on the judiciary since 1973, who had been on a leave of absence from the job since March. (QNS)

Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, whose decisions are helping destroy the Amazon and whose racism, homophobia and bigotry tops any racist uncle you’ve got on Facebook, will skip the NYC gala in his honor after it had become clear that New Yorkers will tolerate a lot of punishment, but hosting him is a step too far. (NY Times)

Breathe easy, literally, if you take the L train, the first dust report is in and the concentration of silica dust is well below the benchmarks for dangerous exposure. (NY Times)

BreakfastClub founder and author of BREAKFAST: The Cookbook shares her favorite breakfasts in the city. (Time Out)

Where to have a graduation lunch or dinner. (The Infatuation)

It seems that Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero program has begun to fail. (amNY)

Youfeng Xu was killed crossing Seventh Avenue with the light in Sunset Park, the person behind the wheel of the truck was charged with failure to yield to a pedestrian and failure to exercise due care. (Streetsblog)

A three-year-old boy was killed while in a crosswalk in front of a stop sign by a van in Bath Beach last week on a street that the city has known to be dangerous for at least five years. The driver blamed the child’s death on his mother. (Gothamist)

Candy. Where do you get it? Anywhere? Wrong. You get it at Economy Candy. (ABC 7 NY)

Senior citizens outnumber millennials when it comes to renting apartments. (NY Times)

An ice cream parlor for humans and dogs. Yes, it’s in Bushwick, how did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

Here’s how New York’s proposed voter affiliation deadline change could help Bernie Sanders in the 2020 presidential election. (Gothamist)

35 outstanding tacos in NYC. (Eater)

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