The Briefly for October 15, 2019 – The “Cuomo Enters the Chazz Palminteri/Mayor De Blasio Feud” Edition

National Grid is told to hook-up new customers, a death at the Brooklyn Museum, Letitia James wins another fight against the Trump Administration, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here are this week’s late-night subway disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Common Cause New York is suing the state because it says New York’s law that allows the removal of voters from the list of “active” voters used at voting sites, which it says is a violation of the National Voter Registration Act. The federal court case begins today. (Gothamist)

Corey Johnson’s “master plan” a) needs a better name and b) will be voted on by the City Council, according to Corey Johnson. (Gotham Gazette)

If you’re here for the Chazz Palminteri/Mayor De Blasio feud in 2019 over a potential statue of an Italian-American saint, here it is. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, never one to not pile on the mayor, says he wants the statue honoring Mother Frances Cabrini in the city. (Patch)

Here’s a reminder of Corey’s Master Plan. (Curbed)

1,136 words from the Times, all to say riding the 14th St bus is good after the street was shut down to traffic. (NY Times)

Is it time to kill NYPL late fees? (Gothamist)

It’s been two weeks since NYPD officer Brian Mulkeen and Antonio Williams were killed by the NYPD and there are still large gaps of information missing about the incident. (Gothamist)

An NYCHA development is selling its air rights for $25 million, but over the next five years, it needs about $159 million in repairs. Can they sell their air rights seven times? (Curbed)

Real estate porn: A West Village townhouse built in 1822 with a basement library and prohibition-era secret tunnel that leads to a speakeasy down the street. (Viewing NYC)

Uber wants to expand its bike-share program in Staten Island, but also wants to severely limit its users’ ability to sue the company. Citi Bike, which is operated by Lyft, does not use forced arbitration, but it does force mediation. (Politico)

Governor Cuomo, never one to not pile on the mayor, says he wants the statue honoring Mother Frances Cabrini in the city. (Patch)

A man died at the Brooklyn Museum in a “freak accident” that involved him trying to slide down a banister and falling backward three stories to the ground on Saturday night. (Gothamist)

Schneps Media bought amNewYork and they’ve been dark ever since with the number of newsroom layoffs rumored to be between seven and 16. (NY Times)

Patch was less gentle, calling the newsroom “gutted.” (Patch)

The five men convicted of killing Lesandro “Junior” Guzman were sentenced on Friday. Martinez Estrella was sentenced to life without parole and the other four co-defendants received 25 to life. (Gothamist)

Attorney General Letitia James won another court battle against the President Trump administration with a federal judge blocking the “public charge” rule on Friday. (Politico)

Brooklyn Supreme Court Justice Sylvia Ashe was arrested on Friday for obstruction of justice which stems from an alleged scheme to cover up an embezzlement scandal involving MCU’s former CEO. Ashe is a former chair of the board of MCU’s directors. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

New York is the first state in the nation to require all ingredients to be listed on tampons, pads, menstrual cups, and period underwear. (Gothamist)

Before The Rolling Loud festival, the NYPD, the figurative and literal cops, asked organizers to remove 22Gz, Casanova, Pop Smoke, Sheff G, and Don Q from the lineup. (NY Times)

Bogdan Darmetko is the 25th cyclist killed in 2019 by a driver on the streets of the city. (Streetsblog)

Four men were killed in a shooting at an illegal social club in Crown Heights over the weekend. The police chief of patrol, Rodney Harrison, gave a quote that blamed the community for the illegal clubs’ continued operation and the deaths. (NY Times)

The governor ordered National Grid to stop playing games a provide gas to more than 1,100 new customers. The governor, never to get a job 100% done, and his demands only apply to the backlog of customers and don’t apply to new ones. (Brooklyn Paper)

Broad City’s Abbi & Ilana are back… to tell us all about the ballot questions on this fall’s elections. (Gotham Gazette)

15 cozy restaurants in the city. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for September 10, 2019 – The “A Horrifying Nightmare Trip on Columbus Ave” Edition

The tribute in lights is killing birds, $90k of stolen cake, a guide to apple picking, more details about the Charging Bull banjo attack, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

San Gennaro kicks off on Thursday, and amNY has a guide for what you need to know and what you need to eat. (amNY)

The May Room, an art installation from Shantell Martin, has taken over Our Lady Star of the Sea, the military chapel on Governors Island, through October 27. This is the first time the chapel is open to the public in twenty years. (Untapped Cities)

While the amusement area in Coney Island is larger than ever, its neighborhood storefronts are struggling with the third highest vacancy rate in Brooklyn and sixth in the city. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

There’s a jimsonweed bush growing on the Columbus Ave greenway at the corner of 93rd St. It’s an odd pick to be planted there, as jimsonweed is highly toxic when consumed. That’s not all. The plant can be made into a powerful drug that is easy to overdose on and if you survive you’re almost guaranteed a horrifying nightmare of a hallucinogenic trip that turns its victims into “zombies devoid of free will.” Avoid the plant. (Gothamist)

Is there nothing New York won’t add alcohol to? Taco Bell, ice cream, and now bubble tea. Bubbleology opens on the 16th in the East Village (Time Out)

A guide to picking apples near the city. (Patch)

This is such a bummer I’m surprised it didn’t come from Neil deGrasse Tyson. The Tribute in Lights, which takes place for a few days every year around the anniversary of 9/11, is killing thousands and thousands of birds. It seems that birds get confused by the light during their migration periods, essentially trapping them and preventing them from having the energy to finish their trip south. Since 2006, the tribute has ruined over a million birds’ flight patterns. (Splinter)

Think about cake. Now think about a lot of cake. Now think about $90,000 of cake. That’s how much cake a deliveryman stole from Lady M in Long Island City. (LIC Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer endorsed Elizabeth Warren for president. He joins City Councilmembers Brad Lander and Antonio Reynoso with his endorsement. Do you think it’ll get awkward when de Blasio finally fails out of the race and comes back to do his job in the city? (Patch)

Restoration on the World’s Fair Observation Towers in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park will begin next month. If you’ve ever been curious what’s at the top of the towers, there are some photos. (Untapped Cities)

We’re no Hawaii, but New York state is the 15th “happiest” state in the country. At least we’re not West Virginia, right? (Patch)

Good news for the asphalt area in Tompkins Square Park, which is known as the epicenter of NYC skateboard culture. The city had originally planned to turn over the area while East River Park gets rebuilt to prevent rising sea levels from destroying Manhattan, but the Parks Department has changed its plans after an outcry from the community and a rally promoted by City Councilmember Carlina Rivera. (Gothamist)

Is NYCHA ready for the next Superstorm Sandy? After the 2012 storm, nearly 80,000 residents were without electricity for weeks. Seven years later, Comptroller Scott Stringer is questioning the de Blasio administration’s preparedness. (Curbed)

More details are starting to emerge about this weekend’s banjo-wielding attack by Tevon Varlack from Dallas on the Charging Bull statue. Repairing the statue will cost around $100,000. (Gothamist)

FlyNYON is already under federal scrutiny for its fatal 2018 East River crash which left five people dead. Now it’s attracting even more negative attention for its recent promotion offering dogs a spot in its doors-off helicopter rides around lower Manhattan. (Patch)

Here are the street closures for the 9/11 ceremonies this year. (amNY)

Photos from the Coney Island Beard and Moustache Competition. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’re yearning for the days of Mayor Bloomberg welcoming people into his administration with a handshake, an expectation of hard work, and a quiet “don’t fuck this up,” “The Many Lives of Michael Bloomberg” may be the book for you. (Politico)

The “where are people going out right now” guide. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for September 5, 2019 – The “Summer Vacation is Ending for the Mayor” Edition

More L train changes announced, stop dropping your AirPods on the subway tracks, renaming the city for women, a mystery tomato grows, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Since firing NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo for his illegal chokehold that lead to the death of Eric Garner, there has been a decline in arrests and summonses all across the city. (amNY)

Summer break is over for the city’s students but concerns about lead paint in classrooms is still going strong. (Gothamist)

The city’s new speed cameras turn on this week from 6 am to 10 pm. Cameras are located within a quarter-mile of the city’s 1,840 public schools and tickets will cost $50. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

No matter what the city eventually decides to do about the gifted and talented programs, New York City Chancellor Richard Carranza has said not to expect any changes this year. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

May de Blasio might drop out of the presidential race if he doesn’t qualify for the fourth debate. We may get a full-time mayor back on October 1. (NY Times)

Maybe de Blasio is better being a part-time mayor if his full-time thoughts would include considering requiring licenses for bike riders. (Streetsblog)

Video: The secrets of Grand Central Terminal. (Viewing NYC)

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Friends, a terrible TV show, Warner Brothers Television is putting 30 replicas of the orange couch around the country, including multiple NYC locations. (amNY)

Warner Brothers attempted to put a couch in Greenwich Village, theoretical home to the irredeemable idiots on the show, but Community Board 2 said no. (Gothamist)

The city could see remnants of Hurricane Dorian on Friday with heavy rain and wind. (Patch)

Stop dropping your AirPods onto the subway tracks. The MTA is tired of retrieving them. (Gothamist)

How did a tomato end up growing out of a piling near the Brooklyn Bridge? (Gothamist)

Tax policy gave us the summer of spiked seltzer. (Grub Street)

What if the city’s subway stops were all named for women? That’s the idea behind the City of Women map, currently on display at the Transit Museum. Would naming a subway stop after Lena Dunham be worse than naming one after Peter Schermerhorn, who was best known for owning a rope factory? (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The elevators in NYCHA buildings are constantly breaking down, which makes sense once you understand the budget to fix them is $74 million, which falls short of the needed $1.5 billion. (Curbed)

Video: Meet the city’s “Mother Pigeon,” performance artist Tina Piña Trachtenburg. (Video NYC)

A walking tour of 1949 Greenwich Village. (Curbed)

The MTA announced how it plans to make L train service worse on nights and weekends as it continues its L Train Slowdown work. These changes are to make accommodation for elevator and escalator construction. (Gothamist)

A look at where we are with the mayor’s $8.7 billion plan to replace Rikers Island with four community jails. (NY Times)

The 15 most anticipated restaurant openings of the fall, according to Eater. (Eater)

Thanks to Chris for today’s featured photo