The Briefly for June 6, 2019 – The “We Can’t Stop The Ratpocalypse or Rising Sea Levels” Edition

The MTA discrimination disability lawsuit can move forward, ThriveNYC is failing the city’s schools, Uber will helicopter you between Manhattan and JFK, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Uber is offering helicopter rides between lower Manhattan and JFK Airport. Uber Copter kicks off on July 9 and will be available during afternoon commutes. (NY Times)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development is pushing a new program that would name a “Tenant of Record,” which would end succession rights, which allows relatives to take over their homes after the primary resident dies or moves out. (Patch)

We are headed for a ratpocalypse. Is climate change to blame? (Grist)

Before steam, NYC homes were heated with coal. If you look carefully on some sidewalks you can still find “coal holes,” which allowed for easy delivery. (Ephemeral New York)

After 20 years and two locations, Park Slope’s gay bar Excelsior will close on July 31. This is the second closure due to rising rents. (Brooklyn Paper)

A sealed arrest record is supposed to reduce the unjust and disproportionately burdensome effect of those records on minorities. The NYPD has decided to have its own interpretation of the law. (Gothamist)

Congrats to this year’s Excellence in Design winners, which “reflect the very best of design in public works, housing, and libraries, parks, and public art.” (Curbed)

Notice something new floating around the city this week? The Sing for Hope pianos are back, celebrating their 500th piano. You’ve got until June 23 to find a piano in the city before they are donated to schools, healthcare facilities, and community centers. (Untapped Cities)

The NYPD is withholding its lists of which officers work at which precincts, claiming stating who is working where would endanger public safety. A lawsuit from the Legal Aid Society will decide if that reasoning is valid. (Patch)

A Midtown fender bender is not news, but it is when one of the cars is driven by Tracy Morgan and it’s a new $2 million Bugatti. (Gothamist)

It seems former prosecutor in the Central Park Five case Linda Fairstein doesn’t know about the Streisand Effect. The woman who coerced confessions from children about a crime they didn’t commit took to the internet to defend her honor after being forced to resign from Vassar’s board of trustees from a student body that did not want her there because of her involvement in the case. (The Root)

Where to eat something quick if you’re running late to a Broadway show. (The Infatuation)

How long would you stay in a rent-stabilized apartment if you could? Ed Higgins has been renting an apartment on Ludlow St for 43 years. His rent in 1976 was $100 a month and now it’s still under $600. (6sqft)

Polly Trottenberg, a voice of sanity on the MTA’s board, is resigning effective immediately upon being replaced. She was a de Blasio nomination in 2014 and has been highly critical of Governor Cuomo’s initiatives in the past. She did not state a reason for her resignation. (Politico)

What’s going on with the F train this week? A dead baby shark (do do do do do do) was found on an F train platform in Manhattan. (Gothamist)

The city’s Fair Fares program has 50,000 participants, and a big help was the expansion of the program in April. The program will expand in 2020 to any New Yorker living under the poverty line. (Curbed)

The de Blasio administration has begun seizing ice cream trucks from owners who are accused of evading nearly $4.5 million in fines. It seems that shell corporations aren’t just for our presidents anymore, because 76 ice cream trucks changed hands between shell corporations to avoid paying traffic and parking tickets. The city has seized 46 trucks so far. (Patch)

It seems the one thing the city’s politicians can agree on is the new entrance designs for Penn Station. (Downtown Express)

ThriveNYC provides no tangible support for the city’s students and councilmember Mark Treyger is calling for a “significant investment” in social and emotional services for students. There are over one million students in the city’s public schools and only 1,335 social workers, 2,958 guidance counselors and 560 school psychologists supporting those students. There are more safety agents than all those combined. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A paid witness used by the defense of Daniel Pantaleo, the officer accused of killing Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, claimed Garner’s death could not have been caused by the hold. He was not present when it occurred and his appearance in court was paid by the defense. (amNY)

Over 100,000,000 have seen The Lion King on Broadway with over 9,000 performances, which are two staggering numbers. (CBS New York)

Councilman Antonio Reynoso announced he is running for Brooklyn Borough President once Eric Adams’ term limits have run out in 2021. (Brooklyn Paper)

After months of presentations and public feedback, the MTA announced a draft plan to improve the Bronx’s buses by improving speeds, reliability and streamlining routes that haven’t changed in decades. (Curbed)

The lawsuit against the MTA that would force the construction of elevators whenever a station is closed for improvements was given the go-ahead in the state’s supreme court, stating the MTA is not about the city’s Human Rights Law’s prohibition of discrimination based on disability. (amNY)

15 stellar spots for raw bar. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 5, 2019 – The “Pole Dancing Rats Are So Last Week” Edition

The future of Sunnyside Yards, dollar oysters, the prettiest block in the city, Jeff Bezos buys an apartment, the appeal of a rear-facing apartment and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Is this a video of cops fighting each other in Harlem, or is it a video of people dressed as cops fighting each other in Harlem? That stupid question is what the NYPD would like you to ask. (Gothamist)

Rumors keep saying that New York City Transit president Andy Byford is on his way out the door. Someone tell Andy, because he reportedly just signed a new lease. (Gothamist)

Let’s not forget the cold history between the governor and Byford, who spend the first few months of the year never speaking to one another directly. (Second Ave Sagas)

Maybe Andy should leave. Governor Cuomo is cutting over three billion from the MTA budget over the next three years. (Daily News)

Pole dancing rats on the subway are so last week. This week it’s all about a loose bat on the F Train. (Gothamist)

The views ain’t great, the light is limited, but it’s hard to fight the appeal of a rear-facing apartment. (StreetEasy)

The Yemeni bodega owners’ protest of the New York Post has cost the newspaper an estimated $270,000 since the protest started two months ago. (The Indypendent)

Get ready wave hello to Rikers Island’s latest prisoner: Paul Manafort. (Patch)

The Death By Audio Arcade’s new home at Wonderville is open on the border of Bushwick and Bed-Stuy. Take a look at photos of the inside. (Gothamist)

Bumble is opening a cafe and wine in Soho this fall. According to Bumble, it’ll also be a place to hold business meetings and meet friends, so if you see a non-single friend in there, don’t freak out. (6sqft)

Apparently, NYC is a great place for a staycation. That’s a great suggestion because people keep dying on Mount Everest. (Patch)

Linda Fairstein, one of the lead prosecutors of the Central Park Five case, resigned her position at Vassar after a student petition with over 10,000 signatures was asking for her full removal. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

If you’ve been asking yourself “electric mopeds, smart cars, bikes, what’s next?” San Francisco is about to receive rentable pogo sticks. (Curbed)

Rent is high, but at least we’re not San Francisco. (Viewing NYC)

If you’re pool hunting this summer, don’t forget to check out Roosevelt Island’s Manhattan Park Pool Club. (Curbed)

Bluestockings in the Lower East Side gets the Atlas Obscura treatment. (Atlas Obscura)

Pastis has reopened after a five-year hiatus. (NY Times)

He couldn’t get a three billion dollar tax break, but Jeff Bezos willing to pay $80 million for a 17,000 square foot apartment in 212 Fifth Ave. (The Real Deal)

10 important lighthouses in the city. Honestly, can you think of one lighthouse in the city? You’re probably surprised there’s enough for a list. (6sqft)

A brief history of SummerStage in Central Park. (Gothamist)

New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams was arrested during a tenants-rights protest in Albany. (Patch)

Eight people have been arrested as part of the city’s crackdown of fake parking placards. Maybe next they’ll address abuse of legitimate placards. (amNY)

Declawing cats is now illegal in the state of New York. (NY Times)

The whole Governors Ball situation just keeps getting worse. The latest is accusations that the guards used excessive force. (BrooklynVegan)

Leonard Swanson, an NYPD officer, was suspended after allegedly choking his girlfriend on Monday night. (Gothamist)

Station Square: “The Prettiest Block in New York” (NY Mag)

2019 could be the busiest year for the city’s skyline. 16 towers are being planned or are currently under construction that top out at over 1,000 feet. To give perspective, there are currently only nine towers in the city at that height. (NY Times)

Could the Sunnyside Yards project become the next Hudson Yards? With a possible 24,000 new apartments built over the railroad yard decks, is a second Hudson Yards a reasonable idea for a borough that already has Long Island City’s luxury housing and could the project still happen without the inclusion of luxury housing? (The Indypendent)

Dollar oyster deals in the city, mapped. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 3, 2019 – The “Albany May Fail to Pass Gay and Trans Panic Ban for Pride” Edition

Moishe’s gets a new life, pre-K workers get a new deal, 57 early voting sites selected, the 25 most expensive homes for sale in the city, Anthony Bourdain day will be June 25, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Wu-Tang Ain’t Nothing To Fur With. (Patch)

Two bills that would ban the gay and trans panic defense (where a legal defense claiming someone else being LGBTQ caused them “extreme emotional disturbance”) are in danger of not passing in the legislature. It’s astounding that anything gets done in Albany. (Gothamist)

The city’s public defenders are demanding a raise, noting that the low pay from their job often forces them to get a second job to make ends meet. They are asking for $50 million to at least be on par with attorneys in the city’s Office of Corporate Counsel. The responsibility to allocate the funds belongs to our mayor, who would rather traipse around the country, pretending to be a presidential candidate. (Patch)

They start at $48 million. The 25 most expensive apartments in NYC. (Curbed)

What do you get with an $85 million home? For starters, two tickets to space. (Gothamist)

What to do and where to eat in Morris Park, east of the Bronx Zoo. (amNY)

Moishe’s Bake Shop, which has had more lives than a feral cat, will reopen after renovations are complete under new management and may potentially change the name to ‘Formerly Moishe’s’. (EV Grieve)

With Amazon searching for office space in Manhattan, it certainly seems that they didn’t need billions of dollars in tax incentives. There should be a lesson in there, but let’s not get our hopes up. (Slate)

George Catalano, the man caught on video attacking a Lyft driver, surrendered himself to the NYPD for reckless endangerment and assault. (Gothamist)

Chefs Eric Ripert and José Andrés announced a day of remembrance on June 25 to celebrate the life of the late, great Anthony Bourdain. (Grub Street)

Fordham University’s Rose Hill campus is home to the oldest seismic station in the United States. (Atlas Obscura)

Robin Russell-French has a bunch of walls and a desire to create the city’s next 5 Pointz. Will it be enough to lure artists to Sheepshead Bay? (Viewing NYC)

39 places for an outside date night. (The Infatuation)

What says “city park” quite like “mass gravesite with a million corpses buried by prisoners“? (6sqft)

Isaiah Thompson, the subway brake bandit, was charged with reckless endangerment and criminal trespass for creating 747 subway delay between March and May, add public lewdness charges to the pile for exposing himself to a platform of people in mid-May. (Gothamist)

The city is making changes to how pre-k teachers and childcare providers as paid, avoiding a strike. Pre-K for all is one of the mayor’s pet projects. (Chalkbeat)

The pros and cons of living in a doorman building. (StreetEasy)

The DailyMeal’s 75 best hole-in-the-wall restaurants include 21 from NYC. Highlights range from some unconventional picks to pizza staples to NYC standards. (Patch)

The West Village’s Barbuto is closed after fifteen years. This time rent is not to blame, it’s the new owner of the building who does not want a restaurant in that space. (Eater)

A veteran NYPD officer pleaded not guilty to charges that she schemed to murder her estranged husband and the young daughter of her boyfriend. (amNY)

The city’s Board of Elections added 57 early voting sites across the city, which still falls short of the 100 sites proposed by the mayor. Early voting for this fall’s election starts October 26. (Patch)

A look at the proposed BQX streetcar in its current proposed form. (amNY)

Can Sunset Park hold on to its manufacturing roots as the neighborhood is gentrifying? (Gothamist)

Mya Vizcarrondo-Rios jumped to her death from the roof of her Bronx apartment building in February after being bullied and sexually harassed by other students. A lawsuit from her parents claims the school regularly ignored her complaints. Members of the City Council are calling for a probe into what went wrong. (Patch)

The Brooklyn Jewish Children’s Museum has an interactive display wall outside the museum in Crown Heights and the NYPD’s Hate Crime Unit is investigating a message left on the wall stating “Hitler is coming.” (Gothamist)

Times Square is getting an pop-up Museum of Broadway in 2020. (amNY)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez worked as a waitress and bartender in a staged event at the Queensboro in Jackson Heights in support of a fair wage for tipped workers. (NY Times)

The case that Brad Lander, who represents Gowanus on the City Council, is making a bad faith promise with the rezoning around the Gowanus Canal. (Pardon Me For Asking)

13 new outdoor art installations not to miss in June. (Untapped Cities)

New Yorkers have never been shy about cursing in public. (Viewing NYC)

17 tropical restaurants and bars that feel like a vacation. (Eater)

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