The Briefly for January 8, 2021 – The “Call the Terrorists Terrorists” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: “Am I Eligible” Covid-19 website site launches, defending a parking lot of housing, a Tim Burton-themed restaurant opens, and more

Today – Low: 27˚ High: 40˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 27˚ High: 39˚

Between empty offices and Covid-19 restrictions, Financial District restaurants are struggling. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Who would advocate for an NYPD tow pound instead of a residential building? The lunatics in lower Manhattan. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Pro-Trump Terrorist Louis Shenker, 22, of Amherst, Massachusetts was charged with placing a false bomb and making a terroristic threat for a bomb hoax at the Queens Place Mall on Monday. The Gothamist headline claims he was a “Pro-Trump Activist,” but that’s bullshit. Gothamist, you should be better than that. He’s literally being charged for making terroristic threats and has known ties to white nationalists. Louis Shenker is a terrorist and shame on the editors of Gothamist for not acknowledging reality. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

More than 30 percent of New York City’s health care workers remain “hesitant” to get a coronavirus vaccine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city’s schools shortened their quarantine period from 14 days to 10 days after a possible exposure to Covid-19, following a CDC recommendation. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The state has a new “Am I Eligible” website that will notify you when you are eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Beetle House, a Tim Burton-themed restaurant, is open for outdoor dining in the East Village. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Bombora House, an interactive stained glass house installation from Tom Fruin, can be seen at the corner of 13th and Ninth Ave. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side, which closed in October, is reopening next month under new ownership. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Another judge ruled in favor of the homeless New Yorkers that were relocated to the Lucerne Hotel. The case is still working its way through the courts, but they won’t be forced to leave for a few more months. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

The city is moving the homeless New Yorkers in the DoubleTree Hotel on West 36th Street to another hotel on 40th St after a request by the Community Board, claiming density as the main issue. (Courtney Gross for NY1)

10 new delivery-only restaurants born out of the pandemic. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Pixar’s Soul takes place in NYC, eight ways ‘Soul’ gets NYC right. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

There are 100 free car parking spaces for every bicycle spot in NYC, according to a new study from Transportation Alternatives, which asks the city to make the city more bike-friendly by installing 1,500 new bike parking spaces, among other changes. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Actions have consequences, but inaction also has consequences. 66-year-old Eleanor Dowe left her 19th-floor apartment on her way to a dialysis appointment and used the stairs because the elevators were out and slipped and struck her head, causing a severe brain injury. She had made 15 calls about broken elevators to NYCHA since August. Now she’s in a coma. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

The NYPD sent around a memo reminding its members that illegal parking is illegal. Mayor de Blasio cut two units from the city’s budget that were dedicated to enforcing placard abuse. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The former tenants of a Dean Street building are looking to be included in the city’s lawsuit against their former eco-yogi slumlords. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

A Trader Joe’s is coming to Harlem. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

“Moynihan is not perfect, and I know better than anyone else that this train hall is technically not Pennsylvania Station. But for the moment it’s close enough.”
-Justin Rivers, Moynihan Train Hall is Not Perfect, But It’s Close Enough for Untapped New York

An NYPD officer was seen on video appearing to kneel on a Black man’s neck during an arrest in Queens last week. You’ve gotta be kidding me with this. The city’s chokehold ban makes kneeling on a person’s back or neck a misdemeanor. The man arrested is said to have suffered knee and neck injuries while being arrested. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Say hello to the latest list of the most expensive neighborhoods in the city, with NoHo taking the top spot with a median sales price of $3,250,000. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo says this is the year for legal weed in New York. But also 2020 was the year for legal weed in New York. But also 2019 was the year for legal weed in New York. What’s different this time? New York needs money. (Luis Ferré-Sadurní and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

In another attempt to make some cash, Governor Cuomo has also stated his support for legalizing online sports betting in New York. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Farewell to Halloween Adventure in the East Village, the city’s only Halloween Store open in January. After 39 years, the store will be closing soon. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Only 52 people were arrested in connection with the attack on the Capitol, compare that to the more than 40 people arrested on the first night of NYC protests after the death of George Floyd. (Rachel Holliday Smith and Eileen Grench for The City)

Queens’ first IKEA is set to open later this month in Rego Center on Queens Blvd. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

Have you ever wanted to see what $2 million in heroin and fentanyl looks like? A packaging mill in the Bronx was busted by the DEA and five people are facing criminal charges. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

If you missed Mean Girls on Broadway before the pandemic, you really missed it. Mean Girls will not reopen when Broadway returns, whenever that might be. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

[plant-baked] opens today on 7th St, a plant-based bakery. They’re already open and will close when they run out of baked goods to sell. (EV Grieve)

2020’s saddest restaurant closures. (Eater)

The Briefly for January 5, 2021 – The “Thresholds? We Don’t Need No Stinkin Thresholds!” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Moynihan Train Hall opens, the city is failing its vaccine rollout, the best new restaurants of 2020, NYC’s first baby of 2021, and more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 41˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

Slash came out in support of city renaming a portion of St. Marks Jimmy Webb Place. There is a change.org petition if you want to add your name in support. (Bowery Boogie)

The top new restaurants in the city in 2020 from writers, photographers, chefs, restaurateurs, entrepreneurs, and elected officials. (Eater)

Video: Walking through the new Moynihan Train Hall in Penn Station. (ActionKid)

Photos: Inside the new Moynihan Train Hall. (Sophia Chang with photos by Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Did you know that old Penn Station had a women-only waiting room? (Ephemeral New York)

Photos: The art of the new Moynihan Train Hall. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

This January marks 75 years since the shutdown of the City Hall Station. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

12 restaurants with heated outdoor dining in Queens. (Erika Adams for Eater)

There’s a new push to build a windmill farm off the shore of Sunset Park, spearheaded by Senator Charles Schumer, Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, and City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca. (Ariama C. Long for Kings County Politics)

Governor Cuomo has long said that if the city hits a 7-day 9% positivity rate for Covid-19, he would close the schools in the city. The city hit 9% and Governor Cuomo decided schools will stay open. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The more infectious UK strain of Covid-19 was found in New York state in Saratoga Springs. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The city has only used 25% of its Covid-19 vaccine allocation. The mayor announced a goal of one million vaccinations by the end of January. That’s going to be a tough task considering the city has only administered 110k vaccines as of this morning. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Coney Island History Project launched a new podcast, Coney Island Stories Podcast. If you missed the opportunity to get the sand in your shoes this year, take a dip into some history. (Coney Island History Project)

Bird Alert! A bald eagle was spotted in Central Park. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Meet the NYC queens on this season of RuPaul’s Drag Race. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD will file charges against “SoHo Karen,” who accused a Black child of stealing her phone and scratched and tackled him in the process. (Ishena Robinson for The Root)

City Sheriffs broke up three New Year’s Eve parties, including a 300 person karaoke party in Queens. (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

Farewell to Sammy’s Roumanian Steakhouse, closing after 47 years, but it sounds like they have plans of reopening. (EV Grieve)

Max Rose is not running for mayor, saving himself a quick L. (NY1)

The NYPD’s 73rd Precinct tried a radical experiment for five days in December in what could be a model for the future. They removed police officers and replaced them with community members preventing minor incidents. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

10 new public art installations in NYC for January. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Public Advocate Jumaane Williams plans to appoint Cea Weaver, the campaign coordinator for Housing Justice for All, to the City Planning Commission. This would be one of thirteen seats on the commission. (Akiko Matsuda for The Real Deal)

Congrats to Ivett Rodriguez on the birth of her son Jaxel, the first baby in NYC to be born in 2021. (Robert Pozarycki for Brooklyn Paper)

Mayor de Blasio announced the there will be a special election on March 23 for the empty 11th and 15th City Council seats. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

This week is your last opportunity to own a piece of Gem Spa, the auction ends January 7. (Flaming Pablum)

Marine Park Democratic District Leader Lori Maslow resigned after a weird weekend Twitter rant against Chinese people. She’s since deleted her Twitter account. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

A technical glitch that took down the NYC Department of Correction’s Inmate Lookup Service last month has left some incarcerated New Yorkers without access to their lawyers or families. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

State Senator Brian Benjamin is running for City Comptroller, the chief fiscal officer for the city, but The City has uncovered multiple phantom donations, including one from a two-year-old, to his campaign. Benjamin says that he will “return” the money. To whom? Not a great omen for someone who wants to oversee the city’s finances. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Six women have been assaulted at the Morgan Ave L Station since November. If you’re using this station, please be alert when you do. (Matt Fink for Bushwick Daily)

From the “No Sympathy” department comes this story from the Times on how difficult it is to find parking in NYC ever since car ownership soared this year. I used to live downstairs from a guy in Park Slope who never moved his car for street cleaning because, as he explained it, paying for every ticket you get because you don’t move your car is cheaper than paying for a spot in any garage in the neighborhood. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Be careful when crossing 1st Ave and 7th St, because the freshly prepared intersection is now the hole to some sinkholes. (EV Grieve)

Apartment Lust: An historic $4.4 million house in Park Slope’s historic district, complete with garage, two outdoor areas, a full bath in an unfinished basement, and four stories. (Susan De Vries for Brownstoner)

Know a restaurant that opened in 2020? Time Out is making a list. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Robert Sietsema’s 2020 in sandwiches. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 13-14, 2020 – The “Second Wave” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining shuts down on Monday, stay the night at FAO Schwarz, a Manhattan sushi delivery guide, Mayor de Blasio makes a threat, and more

Today – Low: 41˚ High: 60˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Tonight is the peak of the Geminid meteor shower for those in the darker areas of the city with “relaxed” eyes with up to 120 meteors per hour. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Rendering: A look at the giant apartment complex coming to Coney Island, complete with roof pool, in the old Gargiulo’s Restaurant parking lot of.

The Tompkins Square Park Holiday tree is lit. (EV Grieve)

The state’s pension fund will divest from many fossil fuels in the next five years and sell its shares in other companies that contribute to global warming by 2040. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Looking for an interesting place to spend a night in the city? You can Airbnb FAO Schwarz for a night. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here’s an explanation of the NYC Sheriff’s office, because if you’re confused about the distinction between the NYPD and the NYC Sheriff, I don’t blame you. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A guide to the Victorian mansions of Flatbush. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Two officers lied in paperwork and in court about their arrest of a Black Lives Matter protester in 2016. Manhattan DA Cy Vance’s office cleared them of perjery. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

Where to go ice skating in Brooklyn this winter. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

If you never stepped inside CBGB, this virtual version of the club from 2006 will be the closest you’ll ever get. Yes, it includes the bathrooms. (Alex at Flaming Pablum)

DCLA and Borough Arts Council funded artist and cultural organizations, venues, or institutions to be able to utilize public outdoor spaces for ticketed events and performances starting on March 1 thanks to a new Open Culture bill passed by the City Council. The maximum charge for a program will be $20. This will be the first ticketed live entertainment legally allowed in the city since March 2020. The Open Culture program is an extension of the Open Restaurants, Open Streets, and Open Storefronts programs. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If you’re feeling like you just have to get out of the city for good, may I suggest Topeka, Kansas, which will pay you $10,000 if you are a remote worker and move there. There are many cities that will pay you to move there. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Kathleen Casillo was charged with reckless endangerment after she drove her sedan into a crowd of ICE protesters in Murray Hill on Friday, sending six people to the hospital. Casillo says she panicked and hit the gas when protesters were banging on her car. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

It seems New Yorkers got an early jump on buying Christmas trees this year. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

If you’ve had your usual Christmas plans canceled, this year presents a great opportunity to shake things up and join the Audubon Society’s Christmas Bird Count. Don’t lie, you’ve loved following this year’s bird news. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Max Rose, fresh off a defeat for Congress, filed paperwork to run for mayor. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

The Google Doc of holiday light displays, that everyone could edit as they please, from Time Out has been updated into an interactive map. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Manhattan sushi delivery guide. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)


The city is well beyond its thresholds for new hospitalizations, the 7-day average of new cases, and the 7-day rolling positivity average. “This is clearly a second wave in New York City” -Mayor de Blasio. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The governor has shut down indoor dining in the city (again) starting Monday the 14th, thanks to an increase in every single Covid-19 metric the state and city have established. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

Eight hospitals in the city have reached more than 90 percent fullness in their ICUs. Flushing Hospital in Queens is at over 100% capacity. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Only 1.4% of the state’s Covid-19 spread comes from restaurants and bars, but that number doesn’t specify between indoor and outdoor dining. 73.84% of COVID-19 cases spread through private gatherings. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The reactions from restaurant owners ranges from sad, but understanding, to absolutely delusional. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

“Anyone who thinks that their privilege puts them ahead of other people in greater need, that’s not going to happen in New York City.” -Mayor de Blasio. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

An ultra-Orthodox synagogue in Williamsburg seems to have broken social distancing rules for the last time. The mayor stated this week that the city will “move to shut down the building once and for all” after a funeral on Monday brought hundreds of people into the building with no masks. The article threads the needle between the recent Supreme Court case the state lost about religious gatherings and the rules that are still in place regardless of the lawsuit. But also this is a threat coming from Mayor de Blasio, who regularly ignores his own deadlines and threats. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Staten Island’s Mac’s Public House liquor license has been suspended, finally. It was one of 23 city businesses whose licenses were suspended last week. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The Brooklyn Monarch is also on the list of businesses whose liquor licenses were suspended after city sheriffs broke up a party with nearly 400 people inside. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Congrats to Gravesend, which has the highest Covid-19 positivity rate in the city. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The city clarified when outdoor dining can remain open during snow and when snow removal is happening. When a Winter Operations Advisory is given, outdoor dining will stay open, but during a Snow Alert, outdoor dining will close. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

How scientists are tracking the flow of the city’s Covid-19 outbreak, using your poop. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

A day in the life of a contract tracer. (Fred Mogul for Gothamist)

Find your public school’s Covid-19 testing rate online. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The New York City Board of Health passed a measure extending the order for total mask compliance at every school in the city, not just public schools for students, staff, and faculty. Yes, before this order, there was no enforcement of masks in non-public school buildings. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo of Fortitude, the NYPL lion, dressed for the season, and the pandemic.