The Briefly for November 30, 2018 – The “Joyless, Arbitrary, Spiritually Empty” Edition

The weekend subway changes, rezoning North Brooklyn, Mrs. Maisel’s Greenwich Village, the snootiest area of the city, the subway station with the most crime, and more in todays daily NYC news digest.

The weekend’s subway nightmares, explained. (SubwayStats)

Take your pick: a dog film festival, a cat film festival, or a horse film festival. They’re all this weekend. (NY Times)

Amazon’s 4 Star store in SoHo: “among my most dismal shopping experiences in recent memory: joyless, arbitrary, spiritually empty.”

The Gowanus Canal is partially clean for the first time in 150 years. Can it ever be truly clean? (Curbed)

Citi Bike will triple the number of bikes in the next five years as a result of the city allowing its parent company, Motivate, to be bought by Lyft for $100 million. (amNY)

Take a tour of Anable Basin, the future home of Amazon’s HQ2. (Curbed)

If you’ve noticed businesses taking down awnings and replacing them with signs, you’re not alone. Is it a conspiracy? The Department of Buildings has started enforcing old laws that placed limits on letter size and awning size with fines that start at $4,000. City Council members have floated a theory that an awning company has called in complaints to drum up business. (Bklyner)

Mic, who occupied two stories of World Trade Center One, laid off most of its staff and is in talks to sell to Bustle. (Gothamist)

10 secrets of the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree. (Untapped Cities)

Four days of the new “modern” signals on the 7, four days of significant delays, and that was only a small part of what made Thursday’s commute awful. (Gothamist)

While likely not a surprise, Comptroller Scott Stringer released a report that argues the city doesn’t do enough for the city’s neediest families, despite Mayor de Blasio’s affordable housing agenda. (Curbed)

Atlantic Ave-Barclays Center has the distinction of having the most reported crimes of any subway stop in the city, with the Port Authority coming in second. Here are the 25 subway stations with the highest numbers of crime. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Hanukkah approaches, plan properly. (amNY)

A tour of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Greenwich Village. (GVSHP)

Life isn’t difficult enough for cyclists in the city before some nut job starts tossing thumbtacks into Sunnyside’s protected bike lanes. (Sunnyside Post)

What’s the snootiest area in the city? Before you click, try to guess. (StreetEasy)

A portion of LaGuardia’s new Terminal B opened on Thursday, including a fool hall, retail, and also some gates for airplanes to come and go from. Amazon Cuomo was there to cut the ribbon. (6sqft)

The NYPD is getting a new handbook on how to treat victims of crime. According to Commissioner James O’Neill, it’s about “simple human interaction.” (NY Post)

Irate Winterfest attendees are receiving refunds after attending the underwhelming first few days of the event in the Brooklyn Museum’s backyard. The Brooklyn Museum has been quick to point out that the event is being run by an outside company. (Bklyner)

Do opponents have any hope of stopping Amazon in Long Island City? (Gothamist)

A 125th St Whole Foods security guard choked a man unconscious. Turns out they take it seriously when you intentionally mislabel bulk goods. (NY Post)

RIP Bleecker Bob, owner of the appropriately titled Bleecker Bob’s. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

For 20 years, “Santa’s Corner” in Whitestone has been the epitome of “there’s no such thing as too many Christmas light on one house.” (TimesLedger)

The New York State Pavilion in Queens is receiving a $16 million federal grant from FEMA to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. (TimesLedger)

Can a rezoning of parts of Bushwick, Greenpoint, and Williamsburg save North Brooklyn from itself? (Brooklyn Paper)

Unsolicited dick pics being sent over AirDrop on iPhones is a problem and a new City Council bill could make it punishable by a $1,000 and a year in jail. (NY Times)

Kyle Borello, 31, was arrested for riot and attempted assault charges for last month’s Upper East Side fight involving The Proud Boys, a SPLC designated hate group and FBI classified extremist group with white nationalist ties. (NY Post)

13 of the hottest new cocktail bars. (Eater)

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The Briefly for November 19, 2018 – The “MTA is On the Edge of a Death Spiral” Edition

Holding affordable housing hostage in Brooklyn, Prospect Park Lake’s “Floating Goat,” plans to privatize the NYCHA’s operations, the best burgers in the city, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The house of the man who designed Central Park and Prospect Park sits in ruin on Staten Island. The New York Landmarks Conservancy is looking to restore Frederick Law Olmsted’s house and launched a Kickstarter to get it started. (Untapped Cities)

Here are the two options for the MTA fare hikes headed our way in 2019 as the entire system sits on the edge of a death spiral. (Second Ave Sagas)

A developer in Crown Heights is holding affordable units hostage if the city does not approve an upzoning their new development. (Bklyner)

In some parts of the city, limits on Community Board term-limits is a cause for concern when board seats already have a difficult time being filled. (Bronx Times)

If you’re questioning just how progressive de Blasio really is based on his support of Amazon’s LIC HQ2, you’re not alone. (The Real Deal)

The 24 best burgers in the city. (Eater)

Does the Sanitation Department’s boss, Kathryn Garcia, have too much on her plate? On top of being responsible for the city’s trash removal and snow-removal, the mayor also named her as the person to combat toxic lead across the city. (NY Post)

Can the private sector save the NYCHA? That’s exactly what is being considered. The plan would hand over management of repairs and renovations, but it will also sell unused air rights to develop new apartments on underused NYCHA land. (Curbed)

Signal work on the 7 train that started in 2010 is finally scheduled to finish at the end of the month. The work will allow extra trips when the L train shuts down in April. (Jackson Heights Post)

Why are some portions of Manhattan devoid of skyscrapers? The reason is less geological and more financial. (Laughing Squid)

1,500 affordable apartments were headed for LIC, but a certain online retailer’s plans for new offices have put that in jeopardy. (6sqft)

Breathe in, watch the mandarin duck in Central Park swimming in the snow, breathe out. (@notfapgod69)

What is “The Floating Goat” in Prospect Park Lake? (amNY)

The 25-year history of the Union Square Holiday Market. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio fired the chief of the Department of Investigations, and it’s hard to see that it was anything but a personal vendetta against a former friend. (NY Times)

The North Face’s new prototype store in Williamsburg includes a custom-scent made to remind you of Yosemite National Park. (Bedford + Bowery)

The stories of the stray cats of Red Hood. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

A checklist of restaurants and bars to check out before the L train shuts down, but make sure to check that the L train is actually running before venturing out. (amNY)

The best (and worst) spots to watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. (amNY)

The city is no longer without an FAO Schwarz. (Untapped Cities)

The chief responsible for the Harvey Weinstein case who led the NYPD’s special victim’s division (not executive produced by Dick Wolf) has been ousted. His replacement will be Deputy Chief Judith Harrison. (NY Times)

Despite the chaos and insane traffic during last week’s snow storm, the subway was… surprisingly functional. (NY Post)

Panna II, one of the city’s worst-reviewed restaurants, is one of the hottest reservations in the city. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for November 13, 2018 – The “The Final ‘Parts Unknown’ Episode” Edition

Pedestrian plazas bring an old problem to light, the subway car found in the Mojave Desert, Amazon’s Long Island City announcement is coming soon, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Amazon’s choice of Long Island City has been the worst kept secret in some time. The latest rumor is that the announcement will make it official today. Not everyone is thrilled about Amazon’s potential Long Island City headquarters. State Senator Michael Gianaris and City Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, who both represent Long Island City, have worry about the local infrastructure needed to support 25,000 additional workers and the corporate welfare that would be necessary to make this deal happen. (The Real Deal, amNY)

Every spot on Anthony Bourdain’s final “Parts Unknown” in the Lower East Side. (Thrillist)

The Alamo Drafthouse ain’t nothing ta F’ wit. The Wu-Tang Clan’s RZA is working with the Alamo Drafthouse on The Flying Guillotine, a kung-fu themed bar/museum/video store in Shaolin itself, Staten Island. (SILive.com)

“We don’t need him” Simcha Felder, the black sheep of NY’s Democrats, has some real work to do to get back in the good graces of his party. (NY Post)

Vaccine deniers in the Orthodox Jewish community are to blame for Brooklyn’s measles outbreak. (Vox)

Try not to freak out, but the Nutella Cafe is open in Union Square. (Time Out)

Happy belated birthday to the man who received a key to Brooklyn, Tracy Morgan. (NY1)

The NYPD is accused of downplaying a racist attack at the Church Ave Q station after a woman was called a “black bitch” by white man and was then punched and stabbed. (Gothamist)

White supremacist graffiti was found in Williamsburg’s Transmitter Park at the end of Kent St. (Greenpointers)

The story of the subway car on display on the corner of W 42nd and 6th Ave has a wild story from NYC to the Mojave Desert and back. (Gothamist)

The star atop the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is 900 pounds, has 3 million Swarovski crystals, and was designed by Daniel Libsekind. (NY Times)

Andy Warhol (via the Whitney) took over the 14th St station at 8th Ave. It’s not a David Bowie level takeover, but it’s a nice departure from the usual ads. (Gothamist)

The city’s pedestrian plazas and public spaces have become a microcosm of the city’s problems with homelessness and opioid abuse. (NY Times)

In honor of Stan Lee, the most detailed map of Marvel’s New York City. (Inverse)

This is your year to take part of the Coney Island Polar Bear plunge on January 1. Registration is now open. (Bklyner)

The Old New York diorama, made in 1939, at the Museum of Natural History was updated with a new interpretation of the events and highlights the misinterpretations of the Lenape people. (Viewing NYC)

17 thrifty food and drink picks, from oversized cookies to karaoke, from air hockey to beer tours. (amNY)

Women working at LaGuardia earn up to $50,000 less then their male counterparts. (NY Post)

A group in Queens is working to landmark a newly rediscovered burial ground for freed slaves that dates back to the early 1800s. The site was in the process of being developed when workers discovered an iron casket. (Jackson Heights Post)

A bill headed to the City Council will eliminate the position of Public Advocate. There have been four Public Advocates since the office was created in 1993: Mark J. Green (first proposed 311), Betsy Gotbaum, current Mayor Bill de Blasio, and future Attorney General Letitia James. (amNY)

The pink tax extends to transit. Women in NYC spend $26 to $50 more on transit each month due to safety concerns. (amNY)

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