The Briefly for December 15-17, 2020 – The “Sandra Lindsay, First to be Vaccinated” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Snow is headed for NYC, the Met Museum reopens 21 galleries, the city’s “Situation Room” is failing, the best new restaurants, and more

Today – Low: 29˚ High: 39˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Today's edition is sponsored by Media Career Makeover by Mediabistro

Meet Sandra Lindsay, a nurse at a Queens hospital, who was the first person in the United States to be vaccinated against Covid-19. (Sharon Otterman for NY Times)

Answering questions about the Covid-19 vaccine rollout in NY and NJ. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Alright, let’s brace ourselves for a possible strong snowstorm this week. I am not looking forward to fighting to put my pups’ tiny boots on their unwilling feet. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

With the rising number of Covid-19 hospitalization, the mayor is warning that the city is headed for another full-on lockdown as we experienced in the spring. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The NYPL is back to phase one service, with only grab-and-go service in yellow zones. (Norwood News)

Rao’s in East Harlem is now delivering for the first time in its 124 year history. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio has accepted a challenge to ride the subway to show that it’s safe to ride the subway. How very brave of him. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The 21 Club, which if you don’t know is the random building in Midtown with 21 jockey statues outside, is closing after being open since 1930. (NY1)

“We have heard from principals, families, and Learning Bridges partners that the communications from the Situation Room can be frustrating and opaque — far from what you characterized in the mayor’s initial press release as ‘resulting in quick, decisive action for our schools and clarity and transparency for all families.’” What the hell is going on with the city’s “Situation Room,” which was supposed to make the city able to quickly respond to Covid-19 cases in schools? (Amy Zimmer and Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

A man committed suicide by cop after opening fire near a crowd of hundreds of people gathered for a Christmas concert outside the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Morningside Heights on Sunday afternoon. According to City Councilmember Mark Levine, the shooting was yelling he wanted to be killed. (Mihir Zaveri, Troy Closson and Liam Stack for NY Times)

Here is what’s known about Luis Vasquez, the Cathedral of St. John the Devine gunman. (Ashley Southall for NY Times)

What a 421a tax abatement is and how it works. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Photos: The Barrel Owls of Riverside Park are this year’s hot duck. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Attention Bobby Flay: Everyone has to pay rent, you included. (Sasha Jones for The Real Deal)
The city’s outreach at the end-of-line subway stations to New York’s homeless population as the subway closes overnight seems to be seeing success according to the city’s figures. (Mirela Iverac for Gothamist)

Faulty wiring was the cause of the Middle Collegiate Church fire in the East Village, according to a report from the FDNY. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Apartment Lust: The ‘Dean & Deluca Loft’, a $5.8 million, 3,600 square foot, open-style loft in Soho, is up for sale. The loft’s seller is Rhonda Sassoon, fourth wife and widow of famed hairdresser Vidal Sassoon, and the previous owner was Jack Ceglic, the co-founder of Dean & Deluca. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Where to do Christmas stuff in NYC. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)


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15 Hudson Yards has won “2020 Building of the Year” from 6sqft. 15 Hudson Yards is attached to The Shed in Hudson Yards. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A holiday tipping guide. Spoilers: tip cash. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Does your tap water taste a little different? It’s a regular occurrence as plants die off in the upstate reservoirs that hold the city’s water. The Department for Environmental Protection has stated that it is 100% harmless. (Nick Garber for Patch)

Governor Cuomo denies allegations of years of sexual harassment by former deputy press secretary Lindsey Boylan. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Superiority Burger is moving… across the street to a larger space. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

It’s not all good news for the city’s plant-based restaurants, as By Chloe has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection with plans to sell the company. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Shepard Fairy’s Blondie mural on Bleecker at the Bowery was restored over the weekend by artist PraxisVgz. (EV Grieve)

Dounya Zayer, who was thrown on the pavement by Officer Vincent D’Andraia during a protest in May following George Floyd’s murder filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city, the NYPD, D’Andraia, and his supervisor. D’Andraia was suspended without pay and charged with assault with a hearing scheduled for April 2021. His supervisor was transferred. (Eileen Grench for The City)

A new ‘Central Park Five’ law requires police to videotape all interrogations of minors to prevent cops from extracting false confessions. The law was intended to close a gap left in Gover Cuomo’s 2018 criminal justice reforms (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Vodka doughnuts? Vodka doughnuts. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Franklin Park in Crown Heights closed for good on Sunday night after 12 years in the neighborhood. The attached burger joint Dutch Boy will remain open for takeout and delivery. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Met Museum opened 21 renovated galleries that contain more than 500 works after two and a half years of renovations to add new skylights. The work is on all 45 galleries in total is expected to be complete in spring 2022. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Early voting for the special election to replace former Bronx Councilmember Andy King began over the weekend. The hopefuls to replace king are nonpartisan candidates Pamela Johnson-Hamilton, Neville Mitchell, and Kevin Riley. The winner will serve until the end of 2021. (Gloria Cruz for Gothamist)

Video: Drone footage of Central Park Tower, Billionaires Row, Central Park, Columbus Circle, and 53 West 53. (the Dronalist)

The 11 best new restaurants of 2020, according to Time Out. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

Thanks to reader Flo for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 30, 2020 – The “Indoor Dining on July 6? Not So Fast.” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor announces moving $1 billion from the NYPD’s budget, a peacock escapes the Prospect Park Zoo, Broadway stays dark, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 79˚
Possible light rain in the evening.

The mayor announced that he’s committed to redirecting $1 billion of the NYPD’s funding to other city resources. This is a move that both the police unions and police protestors are upset with. The perfect de Blasio move, creating as much anger as possible on all sides. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Brooklyn got a second Black Lives Matter street mural last week, this one outside of Borough Hall. (Meaghan McGoldrick for Brooklyn Paper)

“We don’t need more Black Lives Matter signs painted on streets. We need a real, true cut, and this money laundering ain’t it.” -Nelini Stamp on the mayor’s $1 billion announcement. The announcement includes the transfer of fringe benefits for school safety agents to the DOE, which move around money, which accomplishes literally nothing. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“The purpose of this article is to outline five specific, systemic, attainable reme­dies to the epidemic of police abuse.” This is from May 28, 1985. (David Swanson for Village Voice)

Maybe we won’t have indoor dining starting on July 6? We’re less than a week away from the city’s supposed start of indoor dining and the mayor says he needs to “examine closely and come to a decision in the next couple of days.” The wavering is due to the spike in Covid-19 cases nationwide, not necessarily in the city. When will a decision be made? You’d assume before July 6. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The NYPL lions, Patience and Fortitude, are wearing masks like all good New Yorkers. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An interactive map of apartment prices at each subway stop in the city, with the 2020 edition showing 36% of subway stops experiencing drops in rent. (RentHop)

How much are you supposed to tip movers? The American Moving and Storage Association suggests $25 per person, which doesn’t seem like much for NYC. Here are some things to keep in mind when calculating a tip. (Rita Cidre for StreetEasy)

Tens of thousands of New Yorkers are facing possible eviction without city, state, and federal aid. The stat’es eviction moratorium ends in August, the federal government’s regular Covid-19 assistance ends in July, creating a perfect storm for evictions. (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Making the case why New Yorkers won’t actually move to the suburbs. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

With an unsure future ahead for the city’s schools, the Department of Education purchased an additional 40,000 iPads for students for summer school students, adding to the 300,000 it’s already purchased. (Reema Amin for The City)

Interview: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Black Lives Matter, representing NYC in Congress, her first two years in Congress, and more. (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

We don’t have results from the June 23 primaries and elections yet, and it still may be a while until we get results. There were 765,000 absentee ballots distributed, but only 471,000 votes were cast in person, so when it comes to results we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg. (Jim Brennan for Gotham Gazette)

Broadway will be closed through at least the end of the year. All tickets through January 3 have been refunded, but there’s been no statement on a return date. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Remember how the MTA was in the process of re-designing Brooklyn’s bus systems? Forget it. The MTA says Covid-19 has forced them to put a hold on the plans and they’ll publish a revised timeline in “the next few months.” An announcement to say they’ll make an announcement about an announcement in a few months. The original plan was due at the end of the second quarter. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Will 24-hour subway service ever return? Maybe. The governor is leaving a lot of wiggle room in all of his answers. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Will offices ever go back to normal? amNY looks at the Empire State Building as a bellwether for recovery. Only 15-20% of the building’s occupants that could return have returned during phase two. (Imani Moise and Echo Wang for Reuters)

Crown Heights Caribbean spot Glady’s is shutting its doors permanently due to Covid-19. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Downtown Brooklyn Public Art + Placemaking Fund award in Brooklyn is giving grants of up to $50,000 for public art and performance projects looking to revitalize portions of Downtown Brooklyn. Applications are open through June 25, 2020. (BKLYNER)

Around the city, you’ll find flyers for someone selling flan. A look at New Yorkers who have started businesses making cooking and baking during the pandemic. (Devorah Lev-Tov for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio wants to do something about solitary confinement. He’s assembled a “working group” whose job it will be to create a plan to end solitary confinement and “punitive segregation.” (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Interview: Milton Glaser, shortly before his death, talking about a design idea to unify the city around the word “together.” (Jeremy Alias for NY Times)

13 things you didn’t know about the Woolworth Building. (Michele Cohen for 6sqft)

The city will take over more streets in the evenings to combine Open Streets and Open Restaurants to push restaurant seating into the car lanes and create pedestrian walkways down the center of the street. The streets haven’t been announced but will begin this weekend and run through Labor Day on Friday nights, and all day on Saturdays and Sundays. (Angélica Acevedo for amNewYork Metro)

The City Council unanimously passed the COVID-19 Funding Tracker Bill to establish a public database to track city spending in an attempt to provide balance for relief throughout the city. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

After the police’s violent actions against the Queer Liberation March, Washington Square Park’s statues of George Washington were splattered with red paint in protest. Washington was targeted for his ownership of slaves. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

On Saturday the Covid-19 death toll in New York was down to five, the lowest since March 15. With the United States’ cases hitting new all-time highs, will the people who left the city return and bring new cases with them? (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

In a ramp-up to the weekend and lifeguards returning to beaches, food vendors have returned to Jacob Riis Beach. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery)

A parakeet has been spotted hanging out in Tompkins Square Park. (EV Grieve)

Photos: A peacock escaped from the Prospect Park Zoo. It checked out Flatbush Ave, was chased around by the NYPD, and flew back home. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Thanks to reader Zlata for the photo of last night’s “surprise” fireworks on the East River!

The Briefly for May 12, 2020 – The “Everyone Except Staten Island is Doing It” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Alt-side parking returns for a week, Frank Constanza’s house, jealous of the Finger Lakes, MoMA’s new online exhibit, a dessert delivery guide, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 56˚
Clear throughout the day.

While I was watching the mayor’s press conferences, it hit me just how ugly NYC’s flags are. (Jeff Coltin for City and State New York)

Quickly, what are the names of the two NYPL lions? Patience and Fortitude. I can’t beleive you forgot their names on their 109th birthday. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio is a unifier. With one tweet, tenants and renters both unified in their hatred of him. (Erik Engquist for The Real Deal)

RIP Jerry Stiller. Did you know you can go see Frank Constanza’s house in Queens? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

District attorneys in every borough but Staten Island have pledged not to prosecute those arrested for social distancing offenses, and in some cases, other violations stemming from recent emergency measures. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is coming back for one week so the Sanitation Department can perform a “clean sweep” of the streets. Alt-side parking is back from May 18-25. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Jacques Torres’s Soho flagship store is closing for good. His other locations and Sunset Park manufacturing facility are staying open. (Serena Dai for Eater)

A Queens couple, Paulo Pinho and Clelia Pinho, allegedly attacked a group of Hasidic men on Sunday, supposedly over social distancing. I think they missed the point if they ripped the masks off the men’s’ faces while punching them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

If everything goes according to plan and the city doesn’t become Michigan or Florida, there’s a chance we can start to reopen in June. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The city’s largest provider of shelter and support services for homeless mothers and their children announced a new housing stability and recovery plan, “The Aftermath Plan: Responding to Homelessness in the Wake of COVID-19.” 25% of working mothers in shelters have recently lost their jobs. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Portions of upstate are reopening on Friday. Feeling jealous of the Finger Lakes region? (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

Congrats everyone, we are subsidizing a 90% empty NYC Ferry system! In all of April, there were 19,851 riders on the ferry. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

No one was ready for snow and hail in mid-May. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A bill is working its way through the state’s legislature that will allow businesses to refuse entry to people who have a temperature of 100.4 or above. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

Are your neighbors noisy assholes? Here’s some advice on how to do your best to soundproof your apartment. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Now available from the MoMA is MoMA Through Time, which is an incomplete history of MoMA and MoMA PS1, as told through objects in the archives. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The CDC’s data points to an additional 5,923 deaths in New York City that are not in the confirmed or probable coronavirus death count, starting from March 11. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The best and worst grocery store Mexican food, according to Eater’s food critics. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

“Can’t wait to write a tell all about my experience during my last two trimesters dealing with the incompetent doctors at Montefiore.” –Amber Isaac tweeted about her care at Montefiore a few days before she died, pregnant in the hospital. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

Between the Windows is an art project you can see while walking Manhattan Avenue in Greenpoint, from Vanessa Albury. The first three-week residency features work from David B. Smith. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Moving companies are still at it during quarantine. Not as many people are moving, but it’s still necessary for people leaving the city or for the time-honored New York sport of “there’s gotta be a better place to live than this neighborhood.” (Hoa P Nguyen for Bedford + Bowery)

Remember gyms? Here’s what gyms of New York’s future may look like. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Vourderis family owns and operates Wonder Wheel park, and while bracing for a devastating summer in Coney Island, they are spending their time volunteering. The family has been making 3D printed face shields for first responders using printers that were purchased to make back-up parts for the amusement park rides. “You can’t knock New York City down. You can beat it up a little bit, but it’s always gonna come back.” -Deno Vourderis. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The state Supreme Court’s Appellate Division has rejected a lawsuit that sought to stop the erection of a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over Clara Coffey Park. The bridge will connect Sutton Place South to the East River Esplanade, spanning FDR Drive. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

The NYC dessert delivery guide. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)