The Briefly for May 20, 2019 – The “Casting Literal and Figurative Shade” Edition

A legendary pizza place is temporarily closed, Scott Stringer is making his mayoral candidacy clear, the NYPL’s secrets, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are along the 3, 6, A, D and E lines, but double check before you go anywhere after 10pm. (Subway Weekender)

The BQE Rehab panel is asking for feedback. If you want to provide your feedback, there’s a phone number and a form for the kind of constructive, polite feedback New Yorkers are known for. (BQE Panel)

The developer of the building that would cast literal shade on the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is attempting a char offensive campaign to promote the site’s affordable housing. I’m not sure there’s a New Yorker gullible enough to believe that a company would pay $75 million for a plot of land and then build 1,500 apartments (50% would be “affordable”) because they believe in affordable housing. (Gothamist)

From the pneumatic tubes, to the book train, to the actual visible history you can see in the building, ten secrets of the NYPL’s main branch on 42nd St. (Untapped Cities)

Not on the list is the number of empty floors of stacks. There are some parts of the NYPL that can’t safely store its research collection, which has been moved into storage underneath Bryant Park, where its 11 million book collection is safe. (NY Times)

Wave hello to the city’s newest bars and restaurants. (amNY)

The restaurants ordered closed last week, including surprising inclusions Barcade on 24th and Di Fara Pizza in Midwood. (Patch)

Di Fara says it will be reopening today. (Eater)

If you need more proof that the MTA wasn’t prepared for the L Train Slowdown, the initial cuts to the M14’s route have been altered with this “final compromise.” (Curbed)

35 years after opening, Bookbook in Greenwich Village is closing. It’s not the city’s rising rents, but retirement that’s calling the owners. (NY Times)

This Gothamist piece about a protest from contractors over the proposed rent reforms takes a turn midway through, accusing real estate and landlord groups of astroturfing the hearings. (Gothamist)

630 Fifth Avenue. Quickly, what’s the nearest corner? Take off the last number and you’ve got 63. Divide it by 2 and you have 31. Add 20 because it’s over 600 and the answer is 51st St. Finding a cross street used to involve a little math. (Ephemeral New York)

The city lost 7,500 affordable apartments in 2018, but gained 11,800. There’s a catch. 80% of the new apartments’ affordability status is temporary. (The Real Deal)

Brooklyn’s bra whisperer. (NY City Lens)

The Bronx’s Tibbetts Brook was “moved” underground by Robert Moses. As a result of Robert Moses’s brilliant idea, the surrounding area floods when it rains, the flooding overwhelms the sewers and overflow has to be dumped into the Harlem River. The Parks Department has a plan to bring the brook back above ground to remedy this, but a private rail company stands in their way. (Gothamist)

If you’re unfamiliar with the Combined Sewage Overflow system, the city collects rainwater in its sewer system, and when the combination of rainwater, human waste, and whatever else on the street overload the sewer system, it dumps out in the NYC waters in 13 locations, dumping 377 million gallons of raw sewage into our waters. (Newsweek)

This is why the city closely monitors the water at the city’s beaches for sewage runoff. Beaches were on warning for 49 days in 2018 with one closure. The Swim Guide and website is also available for water condition reports. (nyc.gov and The Brooklyn Eagle)

Notify NYC now offers transit alerts. Why would you want transit alerts from the Department of Emergency Management, a city agency, instead of the MTA, a state agency, or one of the dozens of transit apps? No idea. A quick look shows that the Notify system doesn’t have the same breadth of coverage as @NYCTsubway on twitter. (amNY)

It shouldn’t be to anyone’s surprise at the width of the chasm of difference between the rezoning plans of the Department of City Planning and the Bushwick Community Plan for Bushwick’s future. (Bklyner)

Normal people put up curtains or shades in their bathrooms so people can’t watch them poop. Alex Rodriguez does not appear to be a normal person, or else this photo of A-Rod taking a deuce wouldn’t be on the internet. (Gothamist)

Morgenstern’s is adding a twist to its flagship ice cream location on Houston: booze. (Eater)

The most popular baby names in NYC are Liam, Noah, Jacob, Emma, and Olivia. Not many future kinds named Bran. (Patch)

Turns out the TWA hotel wasn’t actually as ready for visitors like it should have been. (Gothamist)

If you want to attract birds, here are the plants for you to grow. (Patch)

. Turns out the MTA is as good at maintaining its toilets as it is its subways. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Navy Yard ferry stop opens today. (Brooklyn Paper)

Scott Stringer, who has clearly been making a visibility play to run for mayor, says a new tax on the city’s largest businesses could expand subsidies for childcare for 84,000 kids younger than 3. (Patch)

The best cocktails under $10. (Thrillist)

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The Briefly for April 12, 2019 – The “Racist If You Do, Racist If You Don’t” Edition

A hall of fame bad statement about a hit and run, Wegmans is opening this year, a gold steak, the bookmobile returns, the future of street meat, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s something you didn’t want to hear: Getting around on the subways this weekend will be more challenging than usual. (Subway Changes)

Why are there religious exemptions for vaccines? (NY Times)

A dragonstone throne will be inside the West Village Shake Shack in anticipation of Sunday’s Game of Thrones premiere. So unless you’re looking to sit on the throne, you may want to avoid that spot today. (amNY)

The city’s use of SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools was called racist. The city’s attempts to eliminate the SHSAT tests for entrance to elite schools is called racist. (Politico)

A 4/20 guide to Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

The NYPL bookmobile is making a comeback this summer, with a first test in the Bronx, while the Grand Concourse Library undergoes a renovation. (amNY)

Every city borough (except Staten Island) has a higher audit rate than the rest of the state. What gives? (Patch)

17 of the 21 buildings the city is buying for $173 million are “immediately hazardous,” which includes mice and roach infestations, lead paint issues, water leaks, and broken locks. There are over 400 open violations in the buildings and the landlords are under federal investigation for tax fraud and the lawyer representing them in the sale is a de Blasio fundraiser. Weird. (The Real Deal)

Wegmans will open this fall in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. If you lived or went to college upstate, your palms are probably sweating right now. (Eater)

Ivan Nieves was found guilty of vandalizing the African Burial Ground National Monument, which happened on November 1. (NY Post)

Does the Playboy Club have a place in modern New York City? (NY Times)

The most affordable restaurants in New York, according to 14 chefs. (Grub Street)

There have been some phenomenal F-bombs on local TV over the years, from Sue Simmons’ random outburst to Ernie Asnastos’ chicken “loving” incident. Kudos to Chris Cimino, an NBC weatherman who dropped an F-bomb on live TV at 8:15am. (NY Post)

Broadway is getting a Tina Turner musical this fall. (Time Out)

The city will no longer buy single-use plastic cups, forks, knives, spoons or plates for its agencies and the mayor has indicated he supports a ban on single-use plastic in restaurants too (read: straws), with exemptions for people with disabilities. (amNY)

As New York heads towards decriminalizing marijuana use, how it’s treated by the Administration for Children’s Services needs to change. (Gothamist)

If you’re aware of the L Project, MTA Chairperson Pay Foye says that is proof enough of the MTA’s transparency about the project. Right. (Gothamist)

P.S. 9 Teunis G. Bergen will be renamed the Sarah Smith Garnet School to remove the history associated with the Bergen family as slave-holders. Garnet was the first African-American woman to become a principal in the city. (The Brooklyn Reader)

How did the city let the Y2K GPS crash happen? Don’t ask the mayor, because he already has his excuse. “I was not involved in the planning. It was not something that came up to my level.” (NY Post)

Meet the members of Community Board 6, who will decide the fate of the Gowanus neighborhood with a rezoning vote. (Pardon Me For Asking)

How to ID the fake monks that hang around tourist hot spots. (Viewing NYC)

A permit to sell street meat costs only $300 form the city but goes for $25,000 on the black market, which is why the Councilmember Margaret Chin wants to phase in an additional 4,000 permits over 10 years. Opponents are calling for more regulation before more permits are given out. (Patch)

A literal golden steak? Yup. It’s available on Staten Island. (SI Live)

“I left because, come on, I hit a little girl, I’m going to jail.“ Just when you think we’ve hit a hall of fame bad statement about someone’s alleged part in a hit and run, Julia Litmonovich also said: “What is the big deal, it was an accident.” (NY Post)

“Why can’t white people open Chinese food restaurants?” asks your uncle, who normally reserves this kind of stuff for his Facebook page. This is why. (NY Times)

Where to go when you’re not sure its a date. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for March 15, 2019 – The “Manhattan’s Getting More Junk in the Trunk” Edition

The death of a supposed mob boss, Lou Reed’s archive is now available at the NYPL, a guide to the Hudson Yards, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The NYPD’s hate crime unit is investigating the anti-Semitic graffiti on an ad featuring Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (NBC New York)

The MTA will stop L train construction at 7pm following months of constructing dragging on for nearby residents until 11pm six days a week. (Town & Village)

Is Bushwick ready for a Chipotle with liquor? (Patch)

Lower Manhattan is going to expand by approximately 500 feet in a $10 billion effort to protect the neighborhood from the next superstorm. (Gothamist)

Francesco Cali, the supposed boss of the Gambino crime family, was shot dead in front of his Staten Island home on Wednesday night. No suspect has been identified. (Patch)

Frank Cali’s neighborhood was, as the Times puts it, “a fitting location for an old-fashioned Mafia hit.” (NY Times)

Things are just peachy along the L train, as service to Manhattan was suspended on Thursday morning after debris fell onto the tracks. Also? No L train service between Manhattan and Brooklyn this weekend. (Gothamist)

Watch a visualization of the city’s development from 1609 through today. (Myles Zhang)

30 reliable first date spots in Brooklyn, also 30 places to people-watch first dates. (Eater)

A decomposing body was found in the water near the Brooklyn Army Terminal on Wednesday morning, the man was not identified. (Bklyner)

Okay, is winter over yet? (Patch)

The Department of Health announced five yeshivas who illegally allowed unvaccinated students to attend school and the measles count is now at 158. 137 of those cases are under 18. (Bklyner)

All the restaurant specialty nights worth checking out. (Grubstreet)

A guide to inside Hudson Yards, which officially opens today. (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s District Attorney is dipping a toe into the sex work decriminalization debate. He doesn’t support decriminalization but has stated is “rethinking” loitering charges. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Long Island City residents asked for a bike lane along Borden Avenue in January, a cyclist was hit and killed on that road three months later. (Gothamist)

A new bill proposed by City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal would create a searchable database to show empty storefronts that have been vacant for over three months, and owners facing a $1,000 fine for each week they fail to register. (Patch)

Lou Reed’s handwritten poems, sketches, photographs, recordings, and other personal items were acquired by the New York Public Library and will be on display starting today. (amNY)

Part of the celebration of Lou Reed is a limited edition library card sporting his image. (BrooklynVegan)

Everything you need to know about Saturday’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. (6sqft)

Where to eat out when you really can’t afford to. (The Infatuation)

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