The Briefly for June 29, 2020 – The “Even Aliens and UFOs Have Left New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Macy’s unannounced fireworks start tonight, the NYPD pepper-sprays a Pride march, open street dining, beaches opening this week and more

Today – Low: 69˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

Get ready, because tonight starts Macy’s ill-conceived fireworks displays across the city for the next five nights. The city said they will send notifications a few minutes before they start(Ron Lee for NY1)

The story of Charlie H. Cochrane, Jr., the NYPD’s first openly gay cop, who joined the force in 1967. (Carey Reed Zamarriego for Untapped Cities)

Photos: Pride Weekend’s Drag March. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

More Photos: The Drag March. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD celebrated Pride in their traditional style by pepper-spraying and arresting participants of the Queer Liberation March during a dance party in Washington Square Park. (Duncan Osborne for Gothamist)

Answering questions about the availability of the NYPD’s disciplinary records, which will become available in July. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

17 members of the city’s Corrections Department will face departmental charges for their roles in the death of Rikers Island inmate Layleen Polanco last June. Bronx District Attorney Darcel D. Clark and the city’s Department of Investigation have refused to pursue criminal charges. (Jan Ransom and Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

How Occupy City Hall’s 24-hour protests came to be. (Juliana Kim, photos by Amr Alfiky for NY Times)

“Yet on day one of his mayoralty, de Blasio betrayed his word—and even more, the Black and Hispanic communities of New York City—by bringing back an even more blatantly discriminatory policing strategy: the practice of aggressive misdemeanor arrests known as “broken windows policing.””
-Bernard E. Harcourt, professor of law and political science at Columbia University, for Gothamist, Mayor De Blasio’s Police Strategy Has Always Been Racist

The number of UFOs reported across America in the first three months of the year shot up by 112%, but New York’s UFO sightings are among the country’s lowest. Even the aliens know it’s not a good time to see the city. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The headline says it best: The Garbage-Scented, Siren-Laden, and Yet Still Pleasant Reality of Dining Outside Right Now (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

There are over 5,650 restaurants open for outdoor dining in the city, the Department of Transportation has an interactive map. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Maybe some of these locations need to be double-checked since they’re in the middle of bike lanes, which is forbidden by the new guidelines. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The experience of a day of phase two inside Veselka. (Ryan Sutton, photos by Gary He for Eater)

Six ways restaurants have been innovating to enforce social distancing. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The state has extended its to-go cocktail laws for an additional 30 days. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Five years of lessons learned from writing about food and dining. (Serena Dai for Eater, good luck on your new gig)

“For years, the NYPD has used the city’s public drinking laws as a simple pretext for the harassment of communities of color. Of the 15 city police precincts that wrote the most summonses for open-containers in 2010, 12 were located in communities of color. A separate Brooklyn study found that 85 percent of open container citations in that borough were given to Black and brown residents, and only 4 percent to whites.”
-Shabazz Stuart, CEO of Oonee, for Streetsblog, It’s Time to Legalize Public Drinking for All New Yorkers

Dog runs, basketball courts, tennis courts, volleyball courts, handball courts, and bocce courts are returning to the city’s parks with phase three. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything known about indoor dining, which starts on July 6 in phase three of the city’s reopening. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

For the second time in two decades, the MTA is facing a “doomsday budget.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

James Dolan owns Madison Square Garden and the Knicks and might be one of the biggest idiots in the entire city. The CDC’s website with information on Covid-19 antibodies clearly states “Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last.” Has that stopped James Dolan from saying he wants to fill Madison Square Garden with people who have tested positive for antibodies for a benefit show? No it has not. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

A deeper dive into the Summer Youth Employment Program, how its elimination by the de Blasio administration disproportionally affects people of color, and why kids are fighting to bring it back. (Rainer Harris for Curbed)

Red Hook’s Fairway will close by July 17. The landlord will look for a grocery store to take its place. (Liena Zagare for BKLYNER)

Mayor de Blasio is calling for a full eviction moratorium through August 20 and for the state place tenants who miss rent on a year-long payment plan to make up for back rent once they are able to work. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

New York Hall of Science won’t be reopening in 2020, opting for a 2021 date. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Getting students into classrooms in the fall, if that is an option at all, will be a difficult task. The CDC calling for children to be six feet apart, which would be impossible in the city’s 150 schools that are already operating at a capacity of 150% or more. For instance, Francis Lewis High School in Queens is built for 2,188, has 4,492 students and capacity will have to be cut to around 1,000. Whatever happens, school will not be returning to normal in the fall. (Ashleigh Garrison for Chalkbeat)

RIP Milton Glaser, who created the I ♥ NY logo. (William Grimes for NY Times)

It’s a great apartment that will be plagued with construction noise through 2035, but you’ll be close to the trains! (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Spring training hasn’t begun yet and Vegas is already predicting a better season for the Yankees than the Mets. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral welcomed people for Sunday Mass for the first time since March. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s affordable housing lottery is anything but fair to the people who can afford the least. For each apartment available for “extremely low-income” families there are 650 applicants. That is nearly 5x as many applicants for apartments for families making between $122k and $168k/year. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Sunday’s double rainbow. What does it mean? (EV Grieve)

Do you know what this city doesn’t need? A sinkhole problem. A sinkhole nearly ate an SUV on the Lower East Side over the weekend. (EV Grieve)

There are nine NYC beaches opening for swimming on July 1st. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for December 20, 2019 – The “Do You Know About the Secret Pet Tree?” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Inwood rezoning is killed in court, New York state’s $6 billion deficit, the city moves to kill its relationship with the Trump Organization, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 33˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 27˚ High: 42˚

This weekend’s subway disruptions hit the 1, 3, 6, A, E, F, and Q trains. (Subway Weekender)

The story of the two menorahs claiming to be the world’s largest and why there can’t ever be a bigger menorah. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

13 places to find festive holiday decorations in the city. Do you know where to find the secret pet tree in Central Park? (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Landlords are blaming the new rent laws on why they’re cutting back on apartment renovations. Or maybe it’s because landlords are always cutting back on apartment renovations? (The Real Deal)

The fourth annual Kwanzaa crawl is happening on the 26th with stops in Harlem and Brooklyn to celebrate the city’s black-owned restaurants and bars. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Will less garbage cans in Prospect Park lead to people carrying their garbage out of the park? The Prospect Park Alliance will be trying a “carry-in, carry-out” policy modeled after the National Parks Service policy. (Colin Mixson for Brooklyn Paper)

The MTA tried a similar program for five years where garbage cans were removed form stations and riders were encouraged to carry their garbage out with them. It ended because the amount of track fires caused by trash doubled after the program was implemented. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

The MTA unveiled 68 subway stations that will be getting elevator upgrades as part of their 2020-2024 capital plan. Among the 68 are Broadway Junction, Woodhaven Boulevard, and Van Cortlandt Park-242 St. (Vincent Barone for amNewYork)

There are over 100 subway stations across the city where one or more entrance is “temporarily” closed, some since the 70s or 80s. Maybe it’s time to reopen some of these entrances? (Canaan Geberer for Brooklyn Eagle)

After a nine month renovation, the Astoria Boulevard stop on the N/W line reopened on Wednesday, but construction will continue as workers instal elevators, staircases, walkways, and more. (NY1)

Turns out Christmas is predicted to be warmer than average this year and more importantly, no snow. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

We will all wake up on January 1, 2020 sharing the state’s fresh $6 billion deficit. (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

14 historic sites of the abolitionist movement in Greenwich Village. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

Video: Meet Hannah Gavios, who completed the 2019 New York City Marathon on a pair of crutches. (Great Big Story)

Governors Ball wants to move to Van Cortlandt Park the Bronx. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Where to eat with a really big group. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

Queens man impeached. (Victoria Merlino for Queens Eagle)

RIP Felix Rohatyn, “Felix the Fixer,” the man who saved NYC from financial collapse in 1975. (Bruce Nelan for Washington Post)

For a brief period of time on Thursday you could come across impeachment-themed postcards in the Trump Tower gift shop thanks to comedians Davram Steifler and Jason Selvig. They’ve done it in the past too, with Russian flags, Putin postcards, and KKK hoods. (Lee Moran for HuffPost)

For the second year in a row we are ending the year with less chain stores in the city than we started. The city overall is down 304 chains. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

Terra cotta building facades have a history of disrepair and danger, from the death of Grace Gold in 1979 to this week’s death of Erica Tishman. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo’s Mother Cabrini statue has found a home in Battery Park City’s South Cove. The patron saint of immigrants will be across the harbor from the Statue of Liberty. (John Alexander for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Meet Athena Soules: The artist and co-founder of NYC Light Brigade, whose signs are shaping the image of New York’s resistance movement. (Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Eagle)

The City Council appears to be ready to flush the Trump Organization, targeting city contracts with the Trump Organization at the skating rinks in Central Park and the Trump Golf Links in the Bronx. Both locations are underperforming and losing funds for city parks. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

The Heartland Brewery is on its last legs. Down to three locations, one in the Empire State Building and two in Times Square, the Empire State Building location is set to close next month with rumors of the last two locations closing following suit in 2020. (Erika Adams for Grub Street)

We better start getting used to seeing humpback whales in city waters, because they’re hanging out even in winter. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

One day people will look back at the 2019 trend of erecting plastic “igloos” outside in winter and laugh. We’re not there yet. (Adam Goldman for Time Out)

It’s in violation of the city’s paid sick law to require employees to find replacements when calling out sick, but that didn’t stop Starbucks from doing that for years. A settlement with the city is forcing Starbucks to pay $150,000 in restitution. (Kate Offenhartz for Gothamist)

How Jona Rechnitz, “a liar and a felon,” became a star witness after being arrested on corruption charges. (Jan Ramson for NY Times)

The Department of Transportation is hiring seven “apprentice highway and sewer inspectors” to inspect bike lanes and review road work done by contractors. Bike team, assemble! (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

A look back at Mayor Bill de Blasio’s 2019, a year spent trying to convince everyone they were wrong when they said no one wanted him to run for president and eventually he learned the truth and kept pushing until he had no money left and came home. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

The City Council and the mayor blew their own self-imposed deadline of the end of the year to reform the city’s property tax system. That’s politician-speak for “broken promise.” (Janaki Chadha for Politico)

Speaking of blown self-imposed deadlines, it looks like the NYPD won’t actually be encrypting their radios in 2020. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork)

A judge nullified Inwoods rezoning, finding that the de Blasio administration “failed to take a hard look” at how the land use changes will impact the neighborhood. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Only two out of 28 yeshivas investigated by the city’s Department of Education were deemed to be providing an education “substantially equivalent“ to that given at secular public schools, according to the city’s report on the long-delayed investigation into failing yeshivas. (Madina Touré for Politico)

A straightforward guide to holiday tipping. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best new restaurants of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for December 27, 2018 – The “Losing Your Job Over Poppy Seed Bagels” Edition

An NYPD’s accidental shooting victim sues the city, Long Island City primes its real estate, NYC’s immigration courts are a mess because of the government shutdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Let’s explore some NYC ghost stories, from the hellbeasts, to the Staten Island murder mansion, to the hellmouth at Hell’s Gate. (Gothamist)

There’s a ghost subway tunnel that sits above the Broadway stop on the G. The Second System was an abandoned 1929 expansion of the subway system, which would have included an additional tunnel between Williamsburg and Manhattan. That would have been helpful with the impending shutdown of the L. (Greenpointers)

America’s oldest mosque is just around the corner from the Lorimer stop on the L. (Bedford + Bowery)

The FIRST STEP Act, which is aimed at reforming the federal prison system and reducing recidivism, has roots in New York. US Representative Hakeem Jeffries, who represents parts of Queens and Brooklyn, crafted the bill. (Kings County Politics)

IT’s the most wonderful time of the year: Mulchfest! (6sqft)

If you think that you can’t fail a drug test because of poppy seed bagels, you might want to talk to officer Eleazar Paz. Paz was just reinstated to his post on Riker’s Island after being fired over his failed test in January. (NY Post)

Rising rents will claim Chelsea’s The Half King on January 2 after 18 years. (Eater)

Turns out the Queens podiatrist that helped President Bone Spurs dodge the Vietnam War draft did so for preferential treatment from his landlord: Trump’s daddy. (Gothamist)

A tribute to Larry Eisenberg, The New York Times‘ most prolific commenter (whose 13,000 comments were mostly in limerick form), who died on Tuesday at 99-years-old. (NY Times)

Eight minutes of NYC in the 1920’s. (Viewing NYC)

The home of the $18 coffee has closed. Yes, it was in Brooklyn, how did you know? (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

New York is the 15th state to establish a bill of rights for sexual assault survivors. New protections include the right to consult with a victim assistance organization during physical exams and interviews, examinations, preventive HIV treatment and other services at no cost, among others. (amNY)

The federal immigration courts in the city have been thrown into chaos due to the federal shutdown. The Javitz Building’s immigration court, which has a backlog of 105,000 cases, is closed while the Varick Street court remains open. (Gothamist)

The city’s minimum wage increases on December 31. For employers with 11 or more employees, $15 is the new minimum wage. Companies with less than 11 employees will have a $13.50 minimum wage. (amNY)

82% of shots fired by police miss their targets. Irene Ureña Perez was accidentally shot in the abdomen by one of the 27 shots fired plainclothes NYPD officer Juan Gomez while in pursuit of a suspect in early December. Perez is still recovering, has endured multiple surgeries and is suing the city for $10 million. (Gothamist)

Two of the men who were caught on video allegedly assaulted an NYPD officer on a subway platform in Chinatown have been arrested. (NY Post)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s 2018 transit wishlist. (Streetsblog)

As Long Island City girds itself for the delivery of Amazon’s tech bros, prices on prime real estate are going up. (NY Times)

The top restaurant standbys of 2018. (Eater)

30 New Year’s Eve events $35 and under. (the skint)

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