The Briefly for September 11, 2019 – The “Persistence of the NYC Dollar Slice Joint” Edition

The mayor’s failed mayoral campaign promises, how to make the L train slower, a man jumped in the Gowanus, the city buys more ferries, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The city removed the jimson weed plant at 93rd and Columbus, but there’s another plant three blocks away on 96th and Columbus. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jumping into the Gowanus Canal, which has served as a toilet for the city for nearly a century, is pretty high on the “stupidest things you can do in NYC” list, but that didn’t stop some idiot from doing it on Saturday night. He was brought by the NYPD for a psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

Almost nothing is as New York City as the dollar slice joint. Accessible, fast, open all night and welcoming to everyone, these relatively new city staples popped up after the 2008 recession. While Barney’s and Dean & Deluca can’t keep up with NYC real estate, the dollar slice joint persists. (Huff Post)

Is Broadway ready for Robert O’Hara’s “Slave Play?” (NY Times)

The mayor ran for office on a promise to narrow the gap between the richest and poorest New Yorkers. After six years under his leadership, the gap has not changed according to a new report from the Manhattan Institute and the changes that have occurred can be attributed to state-wide and not city-wide initiatives. (Politico)

Animal rights groups weren’t thrilled with the “humane” rodent murder-bucket of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, calling his demonstration grotesque, barbaric, and sadistic and pointed out there are other generally accepted humane ways to eliminate rats that they city hasn’t implemented. (amNY)

The city’s $1.3 billion plan to protect the east side waterfront from Montgomery to E 25th St will get an independent review before moving forward. The city has a deadline of September 2022 to spend federal funding recovery funds allocated to the project (Curbed)

Of Bon Appétit’s 50 best new restaurants in America, 4 are in NYC. (Grub Street)

Were the predatory lending practices that targeted cabbies illegal? The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan is investigating if bank, wire, or mail fraud occurred. The NY Attorney General and the mayor’s office are also investigating. (Patch)

Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick are returning to Broadway in Neil Simon’s “Plaza Suite,” which will begin previews in March. (NY Times)

Every year there are between 100 and 200 cases of Legionnaires’ Disease in the city. The latest was found in residential towers in the Bronx’s Bedford Park. (Norwood News)

One in 15 of the city’s middle schoolers is vaping. (Patch)

The L train doesn’t need to run any slower than it already does, so whoever the jackass was that put their bicycle on the tracks, you are not appreciated. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city is buying three more ferries to add to its fleet for a total cost of $126 million. Taxpayers subsidize each ride by $10.75 on top of the $2.75 fare. The New York City Economic Development Corporation calls this “smart planning.” Is there any wonder that the city’s comptroller’s office isn’t happy with this “smart” plan? (Gothamist)

Photos from Bushwig 2019. (Gothamist)

Photos from DragCon 2019. (Gothamist)

The first of a two-part interview from The Root with Mayor de Blasio was released, covering topics like the Daniel Pantaleo firing, stop and frisk racial disparities, decriminalizing marijuana, raising the minimum wage, and more. (The Root)

The helicopter company that was facing backlash for taking dogs on doorless flights around Manhattan will no longer allow animals on their doors-off flights. (Patch)

A video montage of non-consensual touching by costumed weirdos in Times Square, prepared by the Times Square Alliance. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is seeking $2 billion in restitution from opioid manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacy benefit managers to help New Yorkers who have paid too much in insurance premiums over the past decade because of the opioid epidemic. (amNY)

A driver on Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn killed a 10-year-old boy after his SUV jumped the curb. No arrests were made or tickets were issued at the scene. (Streetsblog)

According to workers, Chipotle is abusing its employees nearly as much as its abusing the stomachs of anyone who eats there. (NY Times)

22 hidden gem private dining rooms in NYC. (Eater)


The Times’ coverage of the anniversary of the September 11 attacks. (NY Times)

The six moments of silence to honor the 2,983 victims of the attacks. (amNY)

Traditionally, the skylight of the Oculus opens on 9/11, but this year it will remain closed due to repairs after it was found to be leaking earlier this year. (Patch)

Remembering 9/11 from the staff of the Windows on the World restaurant, which was located on the 107th floor of the North Tower at the World Trade Center. (Grub Street)

Honoring the Ladder 118/Engine 205’s lost. (Brooklyn Heights Blog)

The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 14, 2019 – The “Four Billion Dollar Leaky Roof” Edition

Bill de Blasio tries to hold a rally, another yeshiva is closed, more speed cameras are coming to the city, a wallaby has a new home, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Video: How much do you love your partner? Enough to get married on the Q train? (ABC 7 NY)

It seems like a bad idea to stop paying your mortgage for five years, but that’s what legendarily stubborn Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer did with her four-story Upper West Side townhouse in protest of a tax issue. (The City)

This is your weekly warning that if you have allergies, never leave the house. This week will bring blooming flowers and misery for you while the tree and grass pollen count remains very high or high through Monday. (Patch)

The Oculus is leaking. After spending $4 billion on the building, $32 million on the skylight, and $30,000 on filling leaks with sealant, you’d think the problem would be under control. The Port Authority will replace the skylight’s rubber seal this summer. (6sqft)

The new Essex Market opened its doors, across the street from the original location. (Eater)

10 fun facts about the new Essex Market. You can’t have an opening without some fun facts! (Untapped Cities)

Video: Watch 24 hours of city transit in one minute. (Will Geary)

Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer accused of choking Eric Garner to death, faces a possible firing during his NYPD internal trial. Pantaleo’s lawyer says he did not use a chokehold and did not have his arm around Eric Garner’s throat when Garner was saying he could not breathe. The trial will last two weeks. (Patch)

With the new price of a MetroCard and no bonuses, does a value or a timed card make more sense? More often than not, even if you commute to work 5x a week, the pay per ride card is a cheaper option. (Gothamist)

Award-winning cocktails and vegan BBQ in the East Village. (Bedford + Bowery)

Mayor de Blasio attempted to create a vision of a man who was running for president by mounting a climate change rally outside of Trump Tower only to be heckled by people with “Trump 2020” and “Worst Mayor Ever” signs. The man no one wants to see run for president said that he’ll make his decision this week about if he wants to spend the next year of his life on a losing endeavor instead of his job as mayor. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio was attempting to tout the city’s New Green Deal’s impact on the Trump Organization, which will cost the company millions of dollars in fines if they don’t renovate their buildings to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030. (Splinter)

Subway maps used to be pretty cool, as evidence of this map from 1958. (Viewing NYC)

It appears that marijuana legalization in New York is on life support. (NY Times)

63% of city voters changing the SHSAT to boost diversity, with 57% willing to scrap the test altogether. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“What the hell does the ‘night mayor’ even do?” No one’s really sure, but at the very least the night mayor’s office has a Facebook and Instagram account now. (BrooklynVegan)

This year a New York Times piece by an Aperol Spritz denier kicked up a city-wide argument in defense of the summer-y drink. There will be a “Rally for Aperol” on Friday, which sounds less like a rally and more like a sponsored event at a bar. (Time Out)

Manhattanhenge approcheth. (I Love the Upper West Side)

An update on Charter Communications, the company trying to buy Time Warner Cable and was subsequently told to leave New York because of poor service, broken promises, and defrauding the state. They’re being allowed to stay after promising they won’t break any more promises. (Boing Boing)

Howie, the wallaby that ended up in the case of the Animal Care Centers of NYC, will find a new home in the Bronx Zoo. (Patch)

The governor signed a bill into law that will increase the number of speed cameras in school zones from 140 to 750 this summer, which makes last year’s fight over cameras feel like an extremely distant memory. The cameras will operate from 6am to 10pm. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Here are the eight hopefuls in the 45th Council District in Flatbush’s special election, vying for Jumaane William’s former seat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Video: Is this the subway car of the future? Forget high tech, just give us a place to stand where our crotch isn’t directly in someone’s face while they eat their carton of egg salad. (Cheddar)

If you’re someone who collected limited edition MetroCards, 9/11 Emergency Responder MetroCard will soon be available at 10 stations. If you’d like to avoid a daily reminder of the city’s terrorist disaster, there are 10 stations you should not buy your MetroCard at. (Gothamist)

A yeshiva in Queens was closed as the city’s cases of the measles is nearly at 500 people. Eight of the nine schools and daycare centers previously closed have reopened under Department of Health supervision. (amNY)

Video: A tour from a real New York insider. Richard Splett’s New York Splett of Mind for Splettnet.net. Richard Splett was recently Richard Splett on HBO’s Veep. (Splettnet)

The five best chocolate chip cookies in the city. (Thrillist)

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