The Briefly for September 24, 2019 – The “Better Off Without the City’s Attention” Edition

The MTA’s buses are going slower, the NYPD will handle “emotionally disturbed” New Yorkers differently, a case for Riverside Pak, the best tapas, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Everyone’s got a to-do list for the mayor, here’s another list of eight issues for him to deal with. (Curbed)

Congratulations are in order to Mayor de Blasio. The mayor announced a plan to speed up the city’s buses 25% and buses are running slower than this time last year. Perfection. (Patch)

Philly pizza? Yup, Philly favorite Pizzeria Beddia Will have one night in the big city on October 1. (Grub Street)

The Oculus’s roof is supposed to open on 9/11 annually, but this year it remained shut due to a leak which was caused by last year’s opening and closing. It’ll cost an additional $200,000 to fix the leak. (Curbed)

The Friars Club made the celebrity roast a common occurrence, for better or worse. Here are ten secrets of the Friars Club. (Untapped Cities)

Video: A striking video about artists and advocates’ push to make Hart Island, New York City’s public cemetery, publicly accessible. (Untapped Cities)

The city was barely ready when the new “Raise the Age” law removed 16-year-olds from the normal court system and placed them in Family Court or “Youth Part” (which is a real part of the justice system). On October 1, 17-year-olds will be moved into these parts of the system and there are doubts the courts will be able to handle it. (The City)

National Grid has frozen 2,600 applications for gas hookups in its temper tantrum over Governor Cuomo’s refusal to add a new gas pipeline to Rockaway Beach, leaving 20,000 apartments and businesses without gas. (Gothamist)

Peak fall foliage will hit the city mid-October. (6sqft)

The former Slave Theater in Bed-Stuy will become a ten-story building with residential “co-living,” hotel rooms and community space. (6sqft)

An argument that Riverside Park is the lowkey best park in the city. (Gothamist)

How much do you trust the NYPD on a scale from 1-10? According to polls, it’s at a 6.6 for the month of August. (amNY)

City Hall will reveal a plan this week for how the NYPD will deal with mentally ill New Yorkers. Over the last decade, annual calls to 911 about “emotionally disturbed people” have doubled from 97,000 to over 180,000. (The City)

The NYPD list a state Supreme Court case and after a yearlong battle will have to reveal fare evasion data, which advocates say will reveal the NYPD’s racist policing policies. (Gothamist)

Vegandale is taking over Randall’s Island Park/a> this Saturday with 150 vegan food and drink vendors. (The Villager)

Everyone has the right to be stupid, even the people stockpiling vape juice ahead of an eventual ban. (Gothamist)

If the biggest problem you have with Roberta’s is that you don’t want to go all the way to Bushwick for pizza, you’re in luck. Roberta’s will be opening a Manhattan outpost in the spring. (Eater)

A replica of Josef Albers’s “Manhattan” is back at 200 Park Avenue. The original was iconic but also hid a deadly secret behind its Formica panels, asbestos. IT was removed in 2000. (NY Times)

Watch Greta Thunberg’s address to the United Nations Climate Action Summit. (Gothamist)

Meet Katherine Walsh, who will challenge incumbent Assemblymember Félix Ortiz’s State Assembly seat representing Sunset Park and Red Hook with a focus on the environment. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

When Wayne Algenio became the king of San Gennaro by eating 38 cannoli and 54 zeppoli in six minutes, each a week apart, the last thing he was thinking about was the 10,000 calories he just consumed. Here’s a closer look at what it takes to be a king. (Bedford + Bowery)

15 top-notch tapas restaurants in NYC. (Eater)

The Briefly for September 11, 2019 – The “Persistence of the NYC Dollar Slice Joint” Edition

The mayor’s failed mayoral campaign promises, how to make the L train slower, a man jumped in the Gowanus, the city buys more ferries, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The city removed the jimson weed plant at 93rd and Columbus, but there’s another plant three blocks away on 96th and Columbus. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jumping into the Gowanus Canal, which has served as a toilet for the city for nearly a century, is pretty high on the “stupidest things you can do in NYC” list, but that didn’t stop some idiot from doing it on Saturday night. He was brought by the NYPD for a psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

Almost nothing is as New York City as the dollar slice joint. Accessible, fast, open all night and welcoming to everyone, these relatively new city staples popped up after the 2008 recession. While Barney’s and Dean & Deluca can’t keep up with NYC real estate, the dollar slice joint persists. (Huff Post)

Is Broadway ready for Robert O’Hara’s “Slave Play?” (NY Times)

The mayor ran for office on a promise to narrow the gap between the richest and poorest New Yorkers. After six years under his leadership, the gap has not changed according to a new report from the Manhattan Institute and the changes that have occurred can be attributed to state-wide and not city-wide initiatives. (Politico)

Animal rights groups weren’t thrilled with the “humane” rodent murder-bucket of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, calling his demonstration grotesque, barbaric, and sadistic and pointed out there are other generally accepted humane ways to eliminate rats that they city hasn’t implemented. (amNY)

The city’s $1.3 billion plan to protect the east side waterfront from Montgomery to E 25th St will get an independent review before moving forward. The city has a deadline of September 2022 to spend federal funding recovery funds allocated to the project (Curbed)

Of Bon Appétit’s 50 best new restaurants in America, 4 are in NYC. (Grub Street)

Were the predatory lending practices that targeted cabbies illegal? The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Manhattan is investigating if bank, wire, or mail fraud occurred. The NY Attorney General and the mayor’s office are also investigating. (Patch)

Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick are returning to Broadway in Neil Simon’s “Plaza Suite,” which will begin previews in March. (NY Times)

Every year there are between 100 and 200 cases of Legionnaires’ Disease in the city. The latest was found in residential towers in the Bronx’s Bedford Park. (Norwood News)

One in 15 of the city’s middle schoolers is vaping. (Patch)

The L train doesn’t need to run any slower than it already does, so whoever the jackass was that put their bicycle on the tracks, you are not appreciated. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city is buying three more ferries to add to its fleet for a total cost of $126 million. Taxpayers subsidize each ride by $10.75 on top of the $2.75 fare. The New York City Economic Development Corporation calls this “smart planning.” Is there any wonder that the city’s comptroller’s office isn’t happy with this “smart” plan? (Gothamist)

Photos from Bushwig 2019. (Gothamist)

Photos from DragCon 2019. (Gothamist)

The first of a two-part interview from The Root with Mayor de Blasio was released, covering topics like the Daniel Pantaleo firing, stop and frisk racial disparities, decriminalizing marijuana, raising the minimum wage, and more. (The Root)

The helicopter company that was facing backlash for taking dogs on doorless flights around Manhattan will no longer allow animals on their doors-off flights. (Patch)

A video montage of non-consensual touching by costumed weirdos in Times Square, prepared by the Times Square Alliance. (Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo is seeking $2 billion in restitution from opioid manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacy benefit managers to help New Yorkers who have paid too much in insurance premiums over the past decade because of the opioid epidemic. (amNY)

A driver on Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn killed a 10-year-old boy after his SUV jumped the curb. No arrests were made or tickets were issued at the scene. (Streetsblog)

According to workers, Chipotle is abusing its employees nearly as much as its abusing the stomachs of anyone who eats there. (NY Times)

22 hidden gem private dining rooms in NYC. (Eater)


The Times’ coverage of the anniversary of the September 11 attacks. (NY Times)

The six moments of silence to honor the 2,983 victims of the attacks. (amNY)

Traditionally, the skylight of the Oculus opens on 9/11, but this year it will remain closed due to repairs after it was found to be leaking earlier this year. (Patch)

Remembering 9/11 from the staff of the Windows on the World restaurant, which was located on the 107th floor of the North Tower at the World Trade Center. (Grub Street)

Honoring the Ladder 118/Engine 205’s lost. (Brooklyn Heights Blog)

The Briefly for June 10, 2019 – The “Bill Becomes A Law Without Mayor de Blasio’s Signature” Edition

The OMNY finds success, a plan for Rikers that isn’t luxury apartments, even Sesame Street knows how rough the subways are, the MoMA’s closing and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Late nights this week the Brooklyn-count N train takes up R duties after Whitehall, the F is local in Queens, and more reasons you should double check before going anywhere after 11pm. (Subway Weekender)

The full list of winners from last night’s Tony Awards. Hadestown was this year’s big winner with eight awards. (Variety)

Ride shotgun with Cynthia Erivo, while she gets ready for the awards. (NY Times)

A 22-year-old man was arrested on Thursday and arraigned on Friday for buying weapons for an alleged terrorist attack in Times Square. Turns out when he went to purchase weapons, it was from undercover agents. (amNY)

The city’s new Vision-Zero bill will turn into law, no thanks to the mayor. Instead of taking a moment during the brief times when he’s actually in the city where he’s the top official, Mayor de Blasio is allowing the bill to lapse into law. After 30 days, any unsigned bills in the city don’t need the mayor’s signature. (Streetsblog)

Of course, the former East Village home of the Hell’s Angels is becoming a 22-story residential tower with retail on the first floor. (EV Grieve)

Inside the new Pastis, and inside the celebrity-heavy family and friends (and press) preview dinner. (Eater)

Less than a year after opening in a new location, Barbara is playing MSG in August. (Brooklyn Vegan)

A restaurant group is fighting a city bill that would give all New Yorkers who work for a business with five or more employees two weeks of annual paid vacation. The argument from the state’s restaurant association is that it will kill the city’s restaurants. The argument from people who don’t own restaurants is that if you can’t afford to treat your employees fairly and with decency, maybe you shouldn’t run a business. (Eater)

There’s a new installation at the Oculus, a live rice paddy. (Untapped Cities)

The city celebrated Puerto Rico on Sunday with a parade down Fifth Avenue without one notable participant. Everyone except the mayor wasn’t there, choosing to campaign in Iowa instead. (amNY and Patch)

Maybe he should have stayed home. A recent poll had literally no one from Iowa choosing the mayor as their top pick, a feat he shares with Wayne Messam. Who? Exactly. (amNY)

Down below the street can you gid a steady beat, it’s the subway.” Even a Sesame Street song about the subway from 1975 bemoans random express trains, overcrowding, a lack of air conditioning and general rudeness. Plus, it’s a catchy song. (Sesame Street)

There’s a reason Coney Island is known as the “Sodom by the Sea,” and it ain’t crooked games of chance. The epicenter was “The Gut,” where Trump VIllage is today. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

“We looked at it under the surgical microscope, and the best way I can describe it to you is that it was this very small, encapsulated lesion that basically looked like a quail egg.” If you’re squeamish, don’t read this story about how a tapeworm baby ended up inside this woman’s brain. (Gothamist)

You have until Saturday to see the MoMA before it closes for four months for expansion. (Curbed)

How did the boroughs get their names? (amNY)

Brauley De La Rosa, the guy who rammed a cyclist with his car during an argument is an FDNY officer and he says both the eye-witness reports and the video was “blown out of proportion.” Who among us hasn’t attempted to run someone over with our cars during an argument? (Gothamist)

A new bill will re-classify car wash workers as employees who should be receiving the minimum wage instead of treating them as tipped workers. Even with tips, workers usually make less than the soon-$15 minimum. The bill only requires the governor’s signature. (Jackson Heights Post)

“Why don’t you learn English?” Four families are suing the city for failing to provide with translation services for their disabled children. (Gothamist)

A roundup of the city’s newest beers and beer related happenings for the summer. (amNY)

Meet Saadiq Newton-Boyd, the New York City king of Pokemon GO. (Bedford + Bowery)

An illustrated guide to helping the city’s cats. (Gothamist)

Cases of measles have risen to 566 in the city, but as expected, the number of cases in Sunset Park outside of the Orthodox Jewish communities has mostly been contained. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Never under-estimate a New Yorker’s desire to not take out their wallet. This is why the OMNY system will work. Usage is currently 3x the projections. (Gothamist)

If you’re into the idea of a 130-mile bike race, yes a race and not a ride, then The Brooklyn Red Caps are probably for you. A group with a history that dates back to the 70s, the Red Caps’ grueling journeys take them to Pennsylvania, upstate, Montauk and New Jersey. (NY Times)

RIP Nicky Barnes, the ‘Mr. Untouchable’ of Heroin Dealers. (NY Times)

7 takeaways from the disciplinary case or Daniel Pantaleo, the man whose actions may have lead to the death of Eric Garner. (NY Times)

Don’t put anything past real-estate developers, which is why the city council is readying bills to repurpose Rikers Island when it closes with a solar farm and wastewater treatment facility. (HuffPost)

It’s appalling to have to fight for full funding of the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund, but here we are in 2019. (amNY)

Inside the stealth campaign for “responsible” rent reform, the efforts lead by landlords to attempt to stop the state’s attempts to totally rewrite the city’s rent laws. (NY Times)

Real food made by real people served to the city’s children. The point of view from the NYC Healthy School Food Alliance is not hard to understand. (amNY)

The American Museum of Natural History breaks ground on the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation this week. (amNY)

Governor Cuomo is calling the MTA’s management a “failure” after that new timeclock meant to prevent overtime fraud was installed in Queens. It should be noted that the governor technically oversees the MTA. (amNY)

The top restaurants in Manhattan. (Eater)

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