The Briefly for March 18, 2020 – The “Mom and Dad Are Fighting Over Quarantine” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Uber Pools are banned, NY ramps up COVID-19 testing, the Night Mayor makes a request, price gouging becomes illegal, Whole Foods needs bikers, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 53˚
Rain overnight.

Today’s free stream from the Met Opera is Puccini’s La Bohème. Be patient, as their website is being inundated with people wanting to watch.

Ridgewood’s Nowawadays is streaming every night at 8pm.

Caveat’s free programming tonight is Nerd Nite.

Governor Cuomo is the guest on today’s edition of The Daily podcast from the Times. (Michael Barbaro, produced by Austin Mitchell, Adizah Eghan and Lynsea Garrison for NY Times)

The late-night shows are off TV, but they’re not off YouTube. Colbert gave a monologue from the bathtub while wearing a suit, of course. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

We all knew this would happen. The governor and mayor had been showing a unified front against the pandemic for almost a week, which is too long for their often strained relationship. Mayor de Blasio made waves by claiming that a shelter-in-place order might be coming in the next two days, but Governor Cuomo made certain to publicly state he’s the only person that can make that order and has no plans to quarantine any city. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio was so intent on keeping city libraries open during the coronavirus outbreak that he went as far as making veiled threats about cutting their funding if they closed. What a leader. (Sally Goldenberg and Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

“Our schools are important, he said. Here’s what we heard: Our lives are not.” -An editorial from Emily James, an NYC teacher looking at the last few weeks. (Emily James for HuffPost)

How to get around NYC safely during the coronavirus pandemic. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Uber, Via and Lyft pool rides in NYC are banned. The only people who should be getting into cars together are “real couples,” according to the mayor. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

What about Access-a-Ride? The MTA has made no such ruling, despite Access-a-Ride customers being among the city’s most vulnerable. The MTA is “working on it.” (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

Ridership is down 60% on the subways and 90% on commuter trains and the MTA is seeking a $4 billion federal bailout. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

This is how we know it’s a true problem: Alternate side of the street parking has been suspended. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Here’s how takeout alcohol sales work. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

$100 a tray for Japanese Hokkaido uni. Omakase boxes starting at $50. Can luxury restaurants go takeout? (Erika Adams for Eater)

What is a restaurant? Is the corner store that mostly serves pupusas a restaurant? A close-up with Mirna’s Pupuseria in Flatbush as they face their future in our new reality. (Ligaya Mishan for NY Times)

Is it possible to govern while socially distanced? We’re getting closer and closer to the due date for the state’s budget on April 1 and assemblymembers are being told to keep their distance. (Fred Mogul and Karen De Witt for Gothamist)

It’s like August in March. The 1% are heading to the Hamptons and spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to rent houses. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

There have been a lot of comparisons to the 1918 Spanish Flu when talking about COVID-19, especially when saying that it became dormant in the summer and came back like the evil in the fall. How did NYC survive the 1918 Spanish Flu? (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Brooklyn DA will not prosecute low-level offenders to reduce the number of people exposed to COVID-19. (Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A walk down a mostly empty Broadway in Astoria. (ActionKid)

It is illegal for any store to raise the price for any product or service that could limit the spread of coronavirus by 10% or more. We can thank the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection for the new rule to prevent price gouging. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If you can ride a bike in the city, there may be a job for you. Whole Foods is looking for cyclists to deliver groceries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

By Thursday, the city’s capacity for COVID-19 testing will be up to 5,000 tests a day. That doesn’t mean that anyone who wants a test will get one, but it means that people who should have been tested already will finally be tested and we can move forward from there. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re working from home and the apartment feels lonely, please remember that you can still foster a dog or cat. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Four players for the Nets have tested positive for COVID-19, including Kevin Durant. (Joe Patorno for amNewYork Metro)

Bandcamp is waiving their cut of sales to show support for artists. If you’ve got a favorite band and want to show some support, go buy some mp3s. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Comic book readers: Call your local shop to see if they are accommodating curbside pickup for your new books this week. (George Gene Gustines for NY Times)

Photos: You know who doesn’t care about the coronavirus? Christo and Amelia, the Tompkins Square hawks. (Laura Goggin Photography)

Some people won’t ever listen, even if it means putting their entire community’s lives at risk. The FDNY broke up a Hasidic wedding in Williamsburg on Tuesday after more than 200 people were in attendance. In the same building, a school was in session. The Times goes out of its way to state that these kinds of events are influenced by the teaching of “extremist leaders” and do not represent the Hasidic community. (Liam Stack and Nate Schweber for NY Times)

Headline: “Brooklyn Ultra-Orthodox Community Faces Spike In Coronavirus Infections, Urgent Care Center Confirms” 🤔 (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Office of Nightlife is gathering information on the impacts for workers, performers, contractors, and businesses from COVID-19-related business closures and event cancellations. Please fill out the survey. (Nightlife Mayor Ariel Palitz)

The Bowery Ballroom and Mercury Lounge have put together a GoFundMe for their 100 staff members. (GoFundMe)

Philippe G. Massoud, chef-owner of ilili and ilili Box has a GoFundMe to provide dry and canned foods, diapers and other necessities to his 130 staff and families. I’m not sure how I’m going to keep covering these GoFundMe efforts. There are hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who need help right now. (GoFundMe)

If you’re connected to a bartender or server or restaurant on social media, no doubt you’ve seen the requests for tips or support in whatever way is possible. The federal government has created out of thin air an additional $3 trillion-plus to flush into the economy. Where the hell is the help for the service industry? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Friday’s looking to be a 70-degree day. Here are the 12 largest parks in the city so you can go outside but keep your distance. (Untapped New York)

Brief hits:
RIP Carolyn Egger, killed by a driver over the weekend in Jackson Heights. The driver was not charged. (Streetsblog) | A virtual tour of the Brooklyn Museum’s ‘Studio 54: Night Magic’. (Brooklyn Based) | The fight over the Atlantic Yards is not over. (The Real Deal) | A time-lapse video of the once-in-a-decade Agave titanota’s bloom, at the New York Botanical Garden. (Viewing NYC) | The gym ban applies to the gym in your residential building. (The Real Deal) | How to digitally borrow books from the NYPL. (Time Out) | Yes, my band does have a Bandcamp page, thanks for asking. (Bad Bloom)

Thanks to reader Zlata for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 26, 2019 – The “This Comes With A $10k Toilet” Edition

The US Open owes $300,000 in rent, Corey johnson writes for food access, New York’s red flag gun law goes into place, new restaurant openings and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Monday means another week of late-night subway changes and disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Public Library’s Hunters Point branch is opening on September 24, after 4 years of construction. (Curbed)

All the big tech companies in the city, mapped. (The Real Deal)

Would you expect anything less than a $10,000 toilet in a $29 million home? (Architectural Digest)

The U.S. Open generates more than $750 million per year in “direct economic impact” to New York City and employs over 7,000 people each, but it also owes the city $300,000 in rent. (amNY)

Welcome to the weirdest office in the city. (Untapped Cities)

New York’s “red flag” gun bill went into effect over the weekend, which allows removal of their guns if a family member, law enforcement officer or educator successfully petitions the court. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Pacific Park, which was previously named Atlantic Yards, is the epicenter of the latest city vs state battle. The state gave approval for a massive underground gym to be added to the development and local officials are outraged that no concessions were made, especially since the developers are already behind in their commitment to creating affordable housing. (Brooklyn Paper)

Via for Schools will give parents and students the ability to track their bus’ locations in realtime. Last year thousands of kids experiencing multi-hour bus rides home from school. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court upheld a rule that bans for-hire vehicles like Uber and Lyfts from having ads inside and on top of the vehicle.

New York’s license plates are changing, but the way they’re made will not be. License plates are made by prisoners earning $0.65/hour at the Auburn Correctional Facility. (Gothamist)

There have been no new measles cases reported in August and with the number stopped at 654, this may signal the end fo the measles outbreak that started in September 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Department of Corrections at Rikers Island cannot legally put an 18 – 21-year-old in solitary confinement, but that doesn’t mean they haven’t found a new form of extreme isolation, this one without any restrictions. (Gothamist)

The Spotted Pig has been in trouble since owner Ken Friedman was accused of groping his female staffers and other sexual misconduct. Foot traffic is down because a declining number of people want to support a business owned by that kind of monster. Now, with foot traffic and revenue down, Ken Friedman sees the writing on the wall and is open to selling. (Eater)

Here are the buildings in the city with the most elevator complaints. (Curbed)

She’s been making breakfast on the city’s streets for over 35 years. Meet the woman behind Mama Jo’s Breakfast Cart and self-proclaimed oldest street vendor in New York City, Mama Jo. (Viewing NYC)

You may not be invited over to Meryl Streep’s townhouse, but you can see what it looks like on the inside through this $18.25 million real estate listing. (Curbed)

It’s late August and someone on the corner of First Ave and third Street just put their Christmas tree on the curb. Amazing. (EV Grieve)

Photos from the Official Animal Rights March. (EV Grieve)

6 ways to celebrate National Dog Day in New York City. (amNY)

Be careful with your children and dogs in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Morningside Park. Deadly, toxic algae blooms have been found in all three parks. The Prospect Park Dog Beach is still safe. These blooms are likely side-effects of the recent, intense rains which have been linked to climate change. (NY Times)

A look back at Mayor David Dinkins, 30 years after his historic 1989 election to become the first black mayor of New York City. (Gotham Gazette)

Corey Johnson’s latest op-ed argues that access to adequate, nutritious food is a human right. (Chelsea Now)

7 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to Leah Bassity for today’s featured image.

The Briefly for September 27, 2018 – 4,800 CitiBikes are Missing, Kids Don’t Read English too Good, and More

CitiBikes are on short supply, the city’s supply of low-rent apartments is declining, the MTA refutes claims of bed bug infestations, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

There are 12,000 CitiBikes in the city, but only 7,166 are on the road the shortages are becoming noticeable.

The MTA calls the bed bug reports are false and “irresponsible.” MTA employees say otherwise.

Stop, close your eyes and ask yourself “What area has the highest population of millennials?” What’s your answer? Don’t over think it, because Williamsburg and East Williamsburg have the highest population of millennials in the country.

The city’s 16 top tapas bars, according to Eater.

Nick Cavy the guinea pig, was rescued in Prospect Park and needs a good home, preferably far away from red-tailed hawks.

The NYCLU launched Equality Watch, an online tool for victims and witnesses of discrimination.

The mayor set out to create or preserve 300,000 units of affordable housing by 2026, but the number of low-rent apartments is declining.

A preview of the new Brooklyn skyline in Prospect Heights as the Pacific Park complex near the Barclays Center enters its next phase.

What’s it gonna cost to live like Dana Barrett in Ghostbusters? Property Shark analyzed the premium you’ll pay to live within one block of Central Park.

The man who attacked two gay men outside a bar in Bushwick is allegedly 25-year-old bigot and homophobe Brandon McNamara from Middle Village, Queens.

Uber will spend $10 million to help develop more efficient transportation policies, reduce congestion, and vehicle emissions, which is a problem partially created by Uber.

Oscar Guevera isn’t a dentist, but that didn’t stop him from putting braces on a 16-year-old girl at his wife’s dental office. He and his wife are being charged with multiple crimes.

City Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, chairman of the Committee on Transportation, announced the second annual 24-hour Riders Respond Transit Tour. Rodriguez and other city officials will ride the subway from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Oct. 3 and 4. Totally lame to split it into two days, right?

Williamsburg cafe Sands’ is closed temporarily after owner Guy Sands was tied to racist, white supremacist groups like The Proud Boys in a 2016 Vanity Fair article. Sands denies the claims.

The 80 Flatbush mega development continues to march forward, getting City Council approval. The next step is mayoral approval and construction may begin.

With fall’s arrival it’s time to tell yourself that you’ll get a flu shot next week, or the week after that, or the week after that… There were 45,368 confirmed cases of the flu in NYC last year.

The “Dear Future New York City” challenge is offering a $30,000 to connect youth with local businesses to find jobs. The challenge is open to 18-24 year-olds and is sponsored by Liberty Coca-Cola.

Express bus route changes with the intention of shortening commute times in Staten Island has resulted in longer wait times and crowded buses.

Drones strapped with explosives is the latest worry for the NYPD during the United Nations General Assembly.

Mayor de Blasio met with Cuban President Miguel Díaz-Canel, seeking to increase relations between the city and Cuba, despite the Trump administration’s decisions.

The results are in. After a recent standardized state exam, 46.7 percent of kids in grades 3 to 8 in public schools were proficient in English and just 42.7 percent were proficient in math. The same results in charter schools were 57.3% and 59.6%. The mayor remains opposed to expanding charter schools saying “I think the answer is to improve the schools we have.”

City Councilman Rory Lancman announced his candidacy for Queens District Attorney in 2019. The mothers of Sean Bell and Cory Garner have both endorsed Lancman. He also targeted over-policing of marijuana and other crimes referred to as victimless offenses.

Electric scooters are gaining support from the City Council, who believes they have the authority to make the legal in New York City, but the de Blasio administration wants to punt on the idea altogether, saying it’s a matter of state law.

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