The Briefly for November 1-2, 2020 – The “Time to Buy Discount Candy” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: New York’s new travel rules, Halloween in NYC, the MTA proposes a doomsday scenario, must-try vegan dishes, an NYC book cart, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 57˚
Rain in the afternoon and evening.

Halloween is over. The first time you’ll hear “All I Want For Christmas Is You” this year could happen any minute now.

New York City is the second-best city in the world. Who did we lose out to? Those bastards in London. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

“I have to urge all New Yorkers—do not travel out of state for the holidays.” -Mayor de Blasio, laying out that this year, everyone gets a pass on visiting family. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Ask An Epidemiologist: How should I handle the holidays? Bullet point number one: If in doubt, don’t go. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

An autumn NYC bingo card. (Jen Carlson and Sarah Butler for Gothamist)

The rules have changed for interstate travel, so let’s take a look. If you’re coming to New York, you’re supposed to have a negative Covid-19 test within three days of traveling and once you’re in New York, you’ll have to isolate until the fourth day after returning and take another Covid-19 test. If you decline a test, you have to quarantine for 14 days. This doesn’t apply to travel to and from Connecticut or New Jersey. This applies to travel from everywhere, not just specific states. How will this be enforced? Once again Cuomo has made his favorite move: shifting the blame onto “local health departments.” No doubt, he will have a press conference in a few weeks, blaming another surge in numbers of a lack of local enforcement. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo gave the go-ahead for schools in the city’s hot zones to reopen with stricter testing guidelines. Everyone, staff and students, must first test negative for Covid-19 and after that testing, 25% of the school must be tested on a weekly basis. A school will be shut down if nine positive tests come back or if any school with over 300 tests has a 2% positivity rate. The city’s rules state if a school has two positive cases, the school must close, so we are left in a weird place where the city’s rules apple on top of the state’s. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

How’s the city doing when it comes to Covid-19? Not great, Bob. There are 67 of 177 zip codes where the average positivity rate is over 2%. Sixteen of them are over 3%. (Elizabeth Kim and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Covid-19 hospitalizations are up, but the situation is not nearly as dire as it was in the spring, with multiple factors preventing a high death count. (J. David Goodman and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

A Tale of Two Cities: Looking at why the rate of Covid-19 testing is 4x higher in wealthy neighborhoods compared to low-income neighborhoods. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

Only 15% of Manhattan office employees are expected to return by the end of this year, which is down from the estimated 26%, an estimate made in August. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Are you headed back to the office? Here are the perks companies are using to entice their workers to come back. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

The only way to really self-isolate is to go to your own island. Ask Kim Kardashian-West, she’ll agree. For only $4.9 million, you can own your own private island in New York with a century-old mansion on the property along with 24/7 security, a private beach, and a kitchen larger than most restaurants in the city. (Dana Schulz for 6qsft)

The great divide in New York isn’t partisan or ideological. And it’s not about where Upstate begins, or which side of that mythical border you fall on. It’s a divide by wealth – of who is struggling amid this pandemic, and who is profiting off of it. Who faces the catastrophic consequences of New York’s budget deficit, and who is insulated from both the stakes of the problem and the policies that could be the solution.
-Public Advocate Jumaane Williams and State Senator Jessica Ramos, A just recovery: It’s time for a billionaires’ tax, for amNewYork Metro

Look at this warehouse full of 400 assholes in Williamsburg. Nearly 400 people were at an illegal Halloween party that was broken up by the city. eight people face multiple charges over the party. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Photos: Some traditions shouldn’t die. November 1? Time to look at photos of costumes and go raid the stores for candy. There was no Village Halloween parade this year, but here’s a photo gallery from Halloween parades past. Now go buy yourself some cheap candy (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

This year’s greatest Halloween innovation is the candy chute. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: Before we get into the election stuff, let’s take a moment to find serenity. Fall foliage is about to peak in NYC. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Photos: More photos of foliage in the city. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Along with peak foliage, the bufflehead ducks are here. This link is complete with a guide to help you spot them. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Staten Island has a duck problem. It seems that people have been releasing domestic ducks into the wild and domestic ducks don’t have natural camouflage or know that it’s time to leave the city once it gets too cold. Urban Rangers have been doing their best to capture them and bring them to sanctuaries in order to prevent them from freezing to death in the winter. (Bree Driscoll for NY1)

How to avoid election stress. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

The most hotly contested election in NYC will be between Congressmember Max Rose and Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, and with a toss-up in the polls and a high number of absentee ballots, the fight will extend far beyond election day. (Clifford Michel for The City)

Who doesn’t love Paul Rudd? He showed up at the Barclay’s Center to give out cookies to people waiting to cast an early ballot. (Josephine Harvey for HuffPost)

Governor Cuomo once said that he wasn’t going to wait for neighboring states to legalize marijuana before he made it happen in New York. On Tuesday New Jersey is voting to legalize marijuana and New York has nothing aside from multiple years of promises that it’s gonna happen. Legalization is currently polling at 66%. (Karen Rouse for Gothamist)

The MTA will not be restoring overnight service on Election Day, forcing poll workers who need to have polling locations open at 6 am looking for other plans. The MTA says that poll workers can get car service if their commute is over 90 minutes on Election Day, but the Board of Education will foot the bill. (NY1)

The MTA has put a 50% reduction of service and scuttling improvements on the table when it comes to trying to fix a gaping hole in its budget. This is a doomsday scenario that would cause New York to lose nearly 450,000 jobs by 2022 and losing $50 billion in the process. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

This is the headline: Driver, Union Say MTA Bus Dispatchers Need Empathy Training After Menstrual Ordeal. (Hasani Gittens for The City)

Make sure that all of your non-internet-based clocks have been set for Daylight Saving Time. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Francisco Garcia, the NYPD officer with a history of seven misconduct lawsuits in five years who also was caught on video punching and then kneeling on a man’s neck during a social distance stop, quit the NYPD before a department trial was able to begin. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Demonstrators and police faced off Tuesday outside the New York City Police Benevolent Association’s headquarters in Lower Manhattan as part of a “Strike The PBA” event, calling for the PBA to be kicked out from the larger labor movement due to its support of officers who have killed New Yorkers and its endorsement of former New Yorker and known racist President Donald Trump. (Amba Guerguerian for The Indypendent)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea announced Juanita Holmes as the new Chief of Patrol, making her the first woman to ever hold the position in the 175-year history of the department and the highest-ranking Black woman on the police force. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

“Police are on the scene after a car jumped the curb in Queens, killing a woman and child, and injuring a second child.” -Mayor de Blasio, who is not speaking from inside an alternative Cars-based alternate reality where cars are sentient and are capable of murder. In this reality, people who drive cars kill people. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

A crane accident in the city’s second-tallest building sent debris falling to 57th in Billionaire’s Row. Thankfully no one was hurt. (Ed Shanahan for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio gave the go-ahead for the sale of The Mets to billionaire Steve Cohen. Starting today, Cohen is re-instituting unionized employees’ pre-pandemic salaries. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Say hello to Brittany Bond, founder of Common Books, who operates the city’s only traveling book cart. (Nicoleta Papavasilakis for Untapped New York)

“Always read the plaque” is a mantra we should all live by. Stop by 555 Hudson St to find a new plaque honoring Jane Jacobs, who lived at the address from 1947 – 1968. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

19 stand-out vegan dishes to try right now. (Emily Wilson for Eater)

The New York Times has discovered that people have roommates. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

Apartment Porn: A $15 million, three-story Upper East Side penthouse that overlooks Central Park, complete with a glass solarium, two terraces, and a separate one-bedroom guest residence. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Heist! They stole more than 4,000 Prada, Gucci, and Chanel items from a cargo area at JFK, making off with $6 million in goods… until they were arrested. (Troy Closson for NY Times)

The best Filipino restaurants in the city. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for April 23, 2020 – The “No One Cares Why You’re Leaving New York” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The City Council pushes forward with its open streets plan, an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights,” standout sushi takeout and more

Today – Low: 47˚ High: 53˚
Light rain overnight.

Despite the Governor’s orders, some hospitals are not allowing one support person in labor and delivery settings. (Virginia Breen for The City)

7 things you didn’t know about Central Park. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A look at the positive contributions of David Penepent, a mortuary sciences professor at SUNY Canton, who is helping with the transportation, care, and cremation of New York City’s dead during this pandemic. Very often you’ll hear about how bad of a job someone is doing in a moment of crisis, this is the exact opposite. (Alexandra E. Petri for NY Times)

15% of pregnant women in NYC tested positive for COVID-19 in a limited study in Manhattan over a two week period. The findings may give a better look into what’s happening with the general population and highlights a need for universal testing. (Bobby Cuza for NY1)

No cares about your “why I’m leaving New York” essay. That goes double during a pandemic. Just leave and take your guilt about leaving with you. (Claire Fallon for HuffPost)

A “plaque” was put up in Park Slope near Methodist Hospital by an unknown guerilla street artist honoring “grocery workers, nurses, hospital staff, doctors, mail carriers, immigrant laborers, and other true heroes” of the pandemic. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The City Council is looking for ways to resuscitate the city’s summer jobs program. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson pushed a 75-mile open street plan forward on Wednesday. Johnson and Council Member Carlina Rivera dismissed the mayor’s concerns about the plan as irrelevant. The mayor has recently blamed the failure of his open streets plan on New Yorkers. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The City Council introduced an “Essential Workers’ Bill of Rights” on Wednesday, which would require large employers to provide additional protections and hazard pay to those hourly workers helping the city continue to operate during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Christopher Robbins and Sydney Perreira for Gothamist)

Looking to make your Friday night Zoom hangout feel a little more regular? Check out Virtual Cheers, which in return for a donation to the staff of the bar will give you a photo of the bar of your choice. (Beth Landman for Eater)

The organizers of the city’s Pride parades have decided to collaborate to take their events virtual. Global PRide is June 27, but the city has already canceled all public events in June. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

What’s the first thing you’re gonna eat when quarantine is over? 21 famous New Yorkers on the first thing they’re gonna eat. (Alyssa Shelasky for Grub Street)

The mayor has continued to talk publicly about what it will take to reopen the city, including a “Trace and Test” program, which will move people who test positive into isolation, possibly in one of the 11,000 hotel rooms the city has set aside. Right now the city is aiming for 400,000 test kits per month, which isn’t nearly enough for the city’s 8.5 million people. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mayor Bloomberg volunteered to develop a contact tracing program for the tri-state area. Bloomberg Philanthropies has also made a financial contribution of $10.5 million through the Bloomberg School fo Health at John’s Hopkins. This is separate from the Mayor de Blasio’s plan. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is looking to double the number of COVID-19 tests in the state, from 20,000 to 40,000. The 40,000 is “ambitious,” in his own words, with the state’s 300 labs working 24/7 to meet the demand for 20,000. At 40,000 a day, it’ll only take 13 and a half years to test the whole state. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

Foot Locker, H&M, Old Navy, Nordstrom, Party City, and The Gap, welcome to the non-rent paying party. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The underground, hydroponic farm on Worth St, Farm.One, is still operating, but its produce was originally intended for bars and restaurants. Now they are opening up orders to the public. (Tribeca Citizen)

This is a celebration that has to happen.” -Mayor de Blasio on the Fourth of July fireworks. Fourth of July is six days after NYC Pride was scheduled to end. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Bodega-inspired streetwear. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The MTA’s 250 construction projects are moving forward, albeit with some new safety precautions, being deemed essential. With so few people riding the trains, this may be the optimal time to get that work done.(Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Everyone’s made a mistake when ordering groceries, especially now, but what do you do with ten bunches of bananas or 1,200 coffee filters? (Madison Malone Kircher for Grub Street)

Where to get Mexican takeout and delivery in NYC. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

50 things the RESY staff misses most about New York. (RESY)

An interactive map of where to avoid where sidewalks make social distancing impossible. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Now remains a great time to adopt a dog or a cat. The Briefly home has two amazing toy poodles, Scooter and Pepper, and we couldn’t be happier. (Jeff Arnold for Patch)

It’s like “ballet or break dancing on a bike.” Meet BMX champ Matthias Dandois, who is doing tricks inside his Tribeca apartment. (Alex Mitchell for Bronx Times)

Here is the recipe for Junior’s famous cheesecake from scratch. Now I know what I’m doing to try (and fail) this weekend. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Two NY housecats have tested positive for COVID-19, as well as four tigers and three lions in the Bronx Zoo. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Meet Jennifer Marino-Bonventre, an English teacher who is bringing some joy to the city with some fantastic sidewalk chalk drawings. (Debora Fougere for NY1)

The Times found out what the rest of us already knew: New Yorkers want cheap wine and a lot of cheap wine. (Alix Strauss for NY Times)

New York City, a city of winners, and Boston, which is a different city, have different sports teams, different coffee choices, different clam chowders, and two genetically different types of pigeons. (Joshua Sokol for NY Times)

22 standout sushi spots still open for takeout and delivery. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Eater)

Thanks to reader Melissa for today’s featured photo from the East Village.

The Briefly for April 20, 2020 – The “A Museum That Delivers Ice Cream” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Rent strikes do not get the mayor’s support, the best Indian takeout, the City Council moves to give 75 miles of city roads to people and bikes, and more

Today – Low: 45˚ High: 56˚
Overcast throughout the day.

“What a week.” “It’s Monday morning.” Breweries and bars delivering craft beer. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Wearing face masks when it’s not possible to socially distance is now a requirement. (Share Weaver for Time Out)

The Times asks the hard-hitting question: Are face masks the new condoms? (James Gorman for NY Times)

Come back when your nose and mouth are covered.” The new MTA mask awareness campaign is pretty on point. (Brandan Krisel for Patch)

A museum that delivers? Yes, if that museum is The Museum of Ice Cream. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

What’s it like to set up one of the dozens of refrigerated trailers across the city acting as temporary morgues? Here’s the experience of Erik Frampton, who took a temporary job in a truck that can hold 110 bodies at a time. (Arun Venugopal for Gothamist)

11 numbers that show how the novel coronavirus has changed NYC (Corina Knoll, Azi Paybarah, Jacob Meschke and Elaine Chen for NY Times)

We’ve all developed a weird habit or two while staying at home. Leigh Plessner can’t stop buying artisanal jams. (Leigh Plessner for Grub Street)

Video: #SoundTheHorn for transit workers in Grand Central Terminal. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Mayor de Blasio: “I don’t agree with a rent strike.” (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Mayor de Blasio is going to be forced to open up the city’s streets to pedestrians and cyclists. A bill in City Council is moving forward this week as Mayor de Blasio might be forced to actually let the people of the city stretch out a little bit. This will, of course, push the mayor beyond his pathetic open streets idea that collapsed within a week. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Video: Comparing what a walk down Broadway pre- and mid-COVID-19 outbreak. (ActionKid)

One of the prisoners being released into home custody because of COVID-19 concerns? Michael Cohen. (Benjamin Weiser and William K. Rashbaum for NY Times)

Jeff Bezos bought a fourth apartment at 212 Fifth Avenue for $16 million, bringing his total investment in the building to $96 million. $16 million for Jeff Bezos is the equivalent to $9.50 for an average American family in 2018. (Laura Vecsey for StreetEasy)

55 years and 37,000 historic designations all in one interactive map. Now you can see the history of the Landmarks Preservation Commission in one place. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The Department of Housing Preservation and Development requested on Friday that owners of city-funded buildings with income-targeted housing allocate up to 30 percent of those apartments for homeless people. (Sam Raskin for Curbed)

20% of the state’s COVID-19 deaths have taken place inside of nursing homes, and the nine nursing homes with the highest body counts are in the city. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

One thing that is pushing forward like nothing is wrong is health inspections, but no fines are being issued. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Video: “Suck my dick” isn’t exactly what you’d expect to hear from the megaphone of an NYPD officer, but here’s the video anyway. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know about the city’s remote learning plan since it looks like students will be remote learning for the rest of the year. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

A photographer with a license to fly drones from the FAA had his drone confiscated by the NYPD for trying to film the mass burials on Hart Island. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The MTA is facing an $8 billion loss, but that won’t stop it from hiring all 500 new subway cops this year, costing an additional quarter billion over four years. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Temporarily the NYPD will be focusing more on the subways and private security is being hired due to a 55% rise in crime while ridership plummets. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Anything happening in May has been canceled in the city and June isn’t looking so great either. (Allie Griffin for Sunnyside Post)

June events being canceled means that this year’s Pride March is in doubt. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Also on the chopping block for June is the Puerto Rican Day Parade. (Michael Scotto for NY1)

Apartment Porn: 21-foot-high ceilings, carved marble fireplaces, and built in 1873. An $8 million Upper East Side townhouse that feels like an Italian chateau. I don’t know what an Italian chateau feels like, but I’m trusting their opinion here. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The city’s enforcement of the plastic bag ban has been delayed to June. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Video: How far will $1,200 get you in the city? (Patrick Mulligan for NY City Lens)

While things are still bad when it comes to COVID-19, there are small signs of improvement. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork Metro)

New Yorkers can get married and it can happen online. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

Where to get Indian takeout and delivery. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Annie for today’s featured photo!