The Briefly for April 27, 2020 – The “An Upward Failure of Epic Proportions” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The threat to the city’s restaurants, antibody tests are unreliable, the Governor cancels the Queens presidential special elections, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 49˚
Overcast throughout the day.

All eligible voters will receive a postage-paid absentee ballot application to vote in the June 23 primary. (Alejandra O-Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Grocery stores have adjusted to pandemic life, but seemingly no grocery store has had to make the adjustments the Park Slope Coop has made. Transitioning from an all-volunteer workforce to paid workers and turning the people of Park Slope, whatever you think of them, into patient and understanding shoppers. (Terri Ciccone for Eater)

One of the weekend’s most talked-about pieces is an essay from Gabrielle Hamilton, owner and chef at Prune on 1st between 1st and 2nd Ave for twenty years, about closing her restaurant and wondering if there’s a place in the city for it once the city returns. (Gabrielle Hamilton for The New York Times Magazine)

The governor us looking ahead to when the state can start taking baby steps towards reopening. “Phase one of the reopening will involve construction and manufacturing activities, and within construction and manufacturing, those businesses that have a low risk. Phase two would be more of a business-by-business analysis using the matrix that we’ve discussed: How essential a service does that business provide and how risky is that business.” There will be a two week period between phases where the effectiveness will be measured. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The mayor announced two task forces and a series of advisory councils that will begin the talks about restarting the city’s economy. In one of the most unbelievable examples of failing upwards, Chirlane McCray will be leading one of the task forces. McCray is the head of ThriveNYC, the mental health program which has spent $850 million of the city’s money with very little to show for it. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The current COVID-19 antibody tests are unreliable, according to the City Health Department’s Division of Disease Control, and can not determine if you’re immune to COVID-19. (Caroline Lewis, Sophia Chang, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Independent pharmacies will become COVID-19 test collection sites while the state expands testing to essential workers and expands capacity to 40,000 tests a day. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Over a century ago, the subways had their own baseball league. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The Stonewall Democratic Club of New York City endorsed incumbent Yvette Clarke for Congress over anti-LGBTQ Chaim Deutsch during a five-hour virtual endorsement meeting ahead of the June 23 Democratic primary. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Six maps to help you discover the city from home. (Lillia Panych for Untapped New York)

What happens when a roommate defects from NYC because COVID-19 is coming and rent is due? (Kate Mooney for Curbed)

The best, and more importantly worst, frozen grocery foods. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

On March 1, NYC had one confirmed case of the novel coronavirus, research shows it was closer to 10,000. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

The first thing Time Out’s staffers are going to do when life returns to “normal.” Personally, I’m looking forward to going to my band’s rehearsal space and playing my drums again. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The best secret menu items available for delivery. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

AOC was the only Democrat to vote against the federal government’s $484 billion relief package. (Christian Murray for Sunnyside Post)

AOC’s district is the epicenter of the fight against COVID-19 in a city that is already the epicenter of the fight against COVID-19. In an opinion piece, she lays out three policies that a stimulus must include, like $2,000 monthly payments as a first step. (Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for amNewYork Metro)

The special election for Queens borough president is canceled by executive order by Governor Cuomo. The winner was going to serve until the end of the year, which seems pointless at this point. Acting President Sharon Lee will remain president for the rest of the year. (Michael Dorgan for Sunnyside Post)

The L train construction is complete and ahead of schedule. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Remember when congestion pricing was going to happen and the money the state made from it was going to fix the subways? lol. (Yessenia Funes for Gizmodo)

The Metropolitan Opera is continuing its free performances every night this week. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

New York Sports Club is reimbursing its members for fees during the pandemic, marking this the one time NYSC has done anything that appears to be remotely friendly to the city, even if it was forced by the state’s attorney general. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

RIP Richard Hake, beloved WNYC anchor. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

The lost wedding ring on the Upper West Side lost during the 7pm clap? It’s been found! (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

The worst people in the city this weekend were the joggers without masks. Another good reason to never start running. (EV Grieve)

Jane’s Walk NYC honors Jane Jacobs with a series of free neighborhood walking tours every year, with this year’s offering to be a completely remote event during the first week of May. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The NYPD and the Department of Transportation are against opening streets for pedestrians and cyclists, adding to the complete lack of creativity from this administration when it comes to easing the pain of a multi-month quarantine for this city. According to former city officials and epidemiologists, it is something that is achievable. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A look at the city’s roofs, which have become an oasis for those who have access to them. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Eataly, “the world’s largest artisanal Italian food and beverage marketplace,” received a Payroll Protection Program small business loan. Along with their loan, Eataly provided employees an option to receive a paycheck that covers only a portion of missed wages or continue on unemployment and resign. If they resign, they will be ineligible for unemployment. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Eataly gets its loan, but restaurants like the Lower East Side’s LES Enfants de Bohème have not heard back about their application. With $15,000 in bills, while remaining closed, they could be among the half of the city’s small restaurants that may not make it through the pandemic, according to Krishnendu Ray, chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University. (Rebeca Ibarra for Gothamist)

Five weeks after New York City moved to remote learning, 19,000 students who requested devices still don’t have them. (Alex Zimmerman and Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Need a kitchen staple and don’t want to fight the grocery store lines? Try a restaurant. The Times shines a light on places like Glou + Glick and M’s Original in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, which are both buying items like eggs, sugar, flour, and hand soap wholesale to ease the stress of needing a single item. (Elspeth Velten for NY Times)

Breaking down the Giants’ complete 2020 NFL Draft. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Breaking down the Jets’ complete 2020 NFL Draft. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Since the COVID-19 crisis began, approximately 35 percent of the city’s roughly one thousand food pantries, soup kitchens, and mobile pantries have closed, creating the shocking visuals from last weekend showing a line for food in Queens that was 20 blocks long. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

If you’re someone who has fallen in love with Governor Cuomo, the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame is heeding your call. You can pre-order Governor Cuomo bobblehead and the money raised is going to the Million Mask Challenge and the Protect the Heroes fund. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Have we gone too far? Gothamist is calling Governor Cuomo “the Don Draper of politics.” (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Maybe there’s something to this Cuomo idolization, he’s enjoying at 77% approval rating, with 90% support amongst Democrats, 73% with Independents, and 53% with Republicans. By comparison, the president’s approval rating is at 43%. (Joseph Spector for Democrat & Chronicle)

Eater’s top picks, the Eater 38, have been updated for all the restaurants on the list remaining open. (Carla Vianna for Eater)

Thanks to reader Arden for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for March 16, 2020 – The “A City Without Restaurants and Bars” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor shuts down schools, bars, restaurants, and venues, bike riding is up, the story of Typhoid Mary, a walk through Central Park, and more

Today – Low: 42˚ High: 47˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Everything is being canceled and it sucks, but it’s also the right thing to do. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

“States cannot build more hospitals, acquire ventilators or modify facilities quickly enough. At this point, our best hope is to utilize the Army Corps of Engineers to leverage its expertise, equipment and people power to retrofit and equip existing facilities — like military bases or college dormitories — to serve as temporary medical centers. Then we can designate existing hospital beds for the acutely ill.” -Governor Cuomo, making the case for the Army to step-in during this national natural disaster. (Governor Andrew Cuomo for NY Times)

The city will shut down bars and restaurants on Tuesday morning. Bars, restaurants, venues, and nightclubs will close completely for an undetermined amount of time. Think about where you would want to go to eat or drink and ask if they have gift certificates. Give them money now without physically going to those locations. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Seamless has deferred commissions from independent restaurants, but is that enough to actually help restaurants? (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

The city’s schools are closed until April 20. That doesn’t mean there’s no school, as remote learning is set to start on March 23. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

Weed dealers are cleaning up now that everyone is staying home and freaking out. (Matthew Schneier for The Cut)

The Food Bank for NYC has a GoFundMe page for people who want to help, but don’t knowhow. (Food Bank of NYC)

How to talk to kids about COVID-19, from Dr. Rebecca Berry, PhD, an NYU professor who is an expert in child and adolescent psychiatry. (Isabelle Bousquette for New York Family)

Videos: Here’s how the MTA is cleaning the subways. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Jing Fong in Chinatown, the city’s largest Chinese food restaurant, is temporarily closed. With the CDC recommending limiting nationwide gatherings at 50 people, there isn’t much place for a restaurant that seats 800. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

Record Store Day has been postponed from April 18 to June 20. Let’s all hope it doesn’t need another postponement. No one wants to have to wait that long for their Britney Spears – Oops!…I Did It Again (Remixes and B-Sides) vinyl (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

“For the most part when I talk to my colleagues they realize that, yeah, this has the potential to be really serious on a systems level. All in all though, I’d say there’s a calm acceptance about how crazy it’s going to be.” An interview with an ER doc. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Last week late-night shows had plans to continue without audiences, but as of this week, nearly all of them are off the air. The exceptions are the shows filmed in Los Angeles. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Utilities in New York have suspended power, heat, or water shut-offs through the end of April. (Samantha Maldonado and Marie J. French for Politico)

Airbnb is allowing coronavirus-related cancellations without penalty. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Welcome to the Park Slope Food Coop: a COVID-19 “petri dish.” (Matt Troutman for Patch)

So the event you had tickets to was canceled, what now? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s libraries are closed to you in person, but there is plenty to be done online. (Jennifer Schuessler for NY Times)

The headline is “how NYC restaurant workers are getting help so far,” but I’m not naive enough to say that the entirety of the city’s 325,000 workers is actually getting help. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

Catholics have had their obligations to attend mass waived by Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio. (Robert Pozaryski for amNewYork Metro)

“This is a moment we all knew would come. That doesn’t make it any easier.” -Bill de Blasio on the first New Yorker to die due to COVID-19, an 82-year-old woman from Brooklyn. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

State Assemblymembers Charles Barron, who represents East New York, and Helene Weinstein, who represents Canarsie and Flatbush, were diagnosed with coronavirus Saturday. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The Queens borough presidential election has been postponed from March 24, with a rescheduled date to be announced. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)


These YouTube walks through the city, like this one through Central Park, might be a good way to seem like you’re going outside without actually having to go outside. (ActionKid)

ICE has expanded its inhumane arrest patterns as part of Operation Noble Guardian and is now making arrests at JFK airport. (Maxx Katz for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Opera is dark but they’ll be offering free HD streams every night for a week starting on Monday night. (Jasmine Ting for Paper)

Meet Jacqueline VanDusen, who wants to bike every street in Brooklyn. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

This might have been a list of restaurants with openings in the spring. Now it’s a list of restaurants that might open sometime soon. (Eater)

Typhoid Mary, New Yorker. If you don’t know her story, this seems like the perfect time to read up on how isolation can prevent the spread of disease. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Want a distraction from COVID-19? How about bed bugs? What do you know about them? Do you know things? Let’s find out. (StreetEasy)

Black city residents are jailed on Rikers Island for alleged state parole violations 12 times more than whites, while Latinx people are accused of parole violations nearly four times more. Just some of the gems in a new report issued by Columbia Univerity’s Justice Lab on the New York state parole system. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

A look at New York’s former quarantine islands and hospitals. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

How screwed up is our healthcare system? If you need further evidence beyond “look around,” New York hospitals sued their patients 31,000 in the last four years. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

The first signs of real spring, migrating birds, are here. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

Do starter homes exist in NYC? (Localize.City)

A look at Edgar Allan Poe’s farmhouse on the Upper West Side. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Subway ridership is down 20%, but CitiBike riding is up 70%. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

RIP Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, avant-garde music legend and industrial pioneer. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

The Briefly for March 4, 2020 – The “Worst Restaurant in NYC Right Now” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest on the spread of coronavirus in NYC, Robert Durst’s trial, the best pho, Spike Lee vs James Dolan escalates, another L train meltdown, and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 53˚
Clear throughout the day.

Can you name every NYC location in the new Dirty Projectors music video? (Dirty Projectors)

The city’s master plan for the Sunnyside Rail Yards calls for the creation 100 percent affordable housing with 12,000 homes, 60 acres of new open space, equitable home ownership opportunities, the long-sought Sunnyside Station and necessary infrastructure and other public amenities on a publicly controlled site equal in size to Roosevelt Island or six times the size of Hudson Yards. (Bill Parry for QNS)

Here’s what’s happening and what you need to know with the city’s crackdown on food delivery apps. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

It was once thought to be the foundation of a Seneca Village house, turns out it was just a sandboxed from the 1930s. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The headline is enough: Salt Bae Burger Is The Worst Restaurant In NYC Right Now. Beautiful. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The NY Post used a photo of an Asian man in Flushing, Queens to accompany its article about a confirmed case of coronavirus in Manhattan. While nothing the NY Post does should surprise us any longer, they keep finding ways to exceed even our very low expectations. (Carlotta Mohamed for QNS)

A second positive case of coronavirus in New York was found in a lawyer in Westchester with offices on East 42nd Street and whose children attend a Jewish high school in Riverdale. (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The private SAR Academy/High School in North Riverdale yeshiva has been closed as a precautionary measure to prevent further spread. (NY1)

You’ve got questions about coronavirus, here are answers from the mayor and infectious disease professor at Albert Einstein College in the Bronx. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Here’s what you need to know if you have fears of coronavirus on the subway. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The Department of Education attempted to show compassion to parents and students about coronavirus-related school absences and only managed to make things worse and more confused when it comes to what absences would be excused or if students with other illnesses wouldn’t have their absences excused. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

State Sen. Brad Hoylman wants to make it illegal for businesses to double or triple the prices for hand sanitizer, face masks and other medical products as New Yorkers hoard supplies during the coronavirus outbreak. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

How to prepare your home for a pandemic. (Localize.City)

There are a disproportionate amount of media professionals living within proximity of the Park Slope Food Coop and as a result it receives a disproportionate amount of attention. Here is your requisite Park Slope Food Coop members are overshooting because of the coronavirus article. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

From 2013: “We’ve Reached Peak Park Slope Food Coop Mockery.” (Jen Doll for The Atlantic)

The MTA has a long and storied history of being sued over subway accessibility. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

You saw “The Jinx” on HBO, here’s what you need to know about the trial of Robert Durst. (Charles V. Bagli for NY Times)

The L train had another morning commute meltdown on Monday. Cool. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

RIP Matvey Natanzon, a.k.a. Falafel the Backgammon King. (Sam Roberts for NY Times)

The MTA is not allowing workers to wear masks during their shifts to try to prevent the public from freaking out. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

There might be no one that loves the Knicks more than Spike Lee, and even he announced after a run-in with owner James Dolan he won’t be attending any more games this season. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

“I’m not leaving.” Angry Spike Lee is all New Yorkers. (@espn)

New York City is challenging a ruling by a State Supreme Court judge that would reduce the height of a 51-story Upper West Side condo tower. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

If you are waiting for your $100 Global Entry refund after New Yorkers were booted from using the program, you’re not alone. Refunds were supposed to be processed “automatically” on February 6 and everyone is still waiting. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: A 10,350-square-foot, 17-room $28.5 million duplex on the Upper East Side, a discount since the last time it was listed. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

Don’t go pointing toy guns from any rooftop in the city. You will be arrested like this guy from Brooklyn. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The company behind the installations of the LinkNYC kiosks owes the city tens of million of dollars, hasn’t installed nearly the number kiosks they promised, and has come up short of advertising money. The city is considering suing the company to enforce its contract.

New York could be the first state to adopt a Crash Victims Bill of Rights. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

28 top spots for pho. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thank you to the dedicated reader who wanted to remain anonymous for today’s featured photo at Lenox and 125th.