The Briefly for July 13, 2020 – The “A Summer Without Street Fairs” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Public libraries are opening, the first day without a Covid-19 death since March, the MTA looks for ideas, the NYPD steals streets, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 86˚
Clear throughout the day.

You’ll see some headlines that some areas of Queens are seeing a 58% or 68% positive rate for antibodies. While this seems like good news, having antibodies is no way to guarantee that you can’t get the infection again or even that you’ve had the infection in the past. The hope would be that neighborhoods may develop herd immunity. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The city has not built up herd immunity, which is the message from Jay Varna, the Senior Advisor for Public Health, NYC Mayor’s Office, and a vast majority of New Yorkers are still susceptible. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s ban on events means a summer without street fairs. This also includes Celebrate Brooklyn!, the Dominican Day Parade, San Gennaro, and the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

As you might expect, the Electric Zoo 2020 has been canceled. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Saturday was the first day since March 13 that no one was recorded as dying due to the coronavirus. Since March 23,283 were reported dead. (Nick Visser for HuffPost)

A look at the more difficult side of the Occupy City Hall, as the organizers have realized that their roles include caretakers for dozens of the city’s homeless that have taken to making their home in the occupation. (Alan Feuer, Juliana Kim and Byron Smith for NY Times)

Kudos to Sasha Baron Cohen, who hasn’t let the pandemic stop him from freaking out Rudy Giuliani so badly that he called the police. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

An overview of The Montefiore Family Resilience Fund, which supplies assistance for households that have lost a breadwinner or caregiver to Covid-19. The fund will assist 375 families. (Norwood News)

Officer Ernie Moran, an off-duty NYPD cop was arrested in Queens during the early hours Wednesday morning for harassing and stalking his ex-girlfriend. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Mayor de Blasio’s cuts to the NYPD included killing off the parking placard abuse unit, ensuring that he will do absolutely nothing as a mayor to end this form of low-level corruption from the NYPD. The mayor and the City Council have announced multiple initiatives to curb this type of corruption, but literally nothing has been done so far. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The NYPD has seized streets all across the city that are adjacent to station houses. Why? Don’t ask the mayor, who refuses to confront the NYPD on this theft of public space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Is the Staten Island Ferris wheel returning from the dead? The details haven’t been released, but it seems like a smaller version of the original idea might still have life. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Financial struggles brought on by the coronavirus pandemic will keep 15 Catholic schools across New York City closed for good. (Alex Mitchell and Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is turning to the public for ideas for how to keep trains and buses virus-free. Have any ideas? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the work of the Brooklyn Conviction Review Unit, whose job it is to correct hundreds of years of wrongful convictions in Brooklyn of Black and Latinx Brooklynites. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“We take responsibility for what happens in our stores—both on and off our sales floors—and we are committed to doing the work to improve how we treat our employees and customers.” Greenlight Bookstore co-owners Rebecca Fitting and Jessica Stockton-Bagnulo have made a public apology for creating an unwelcoming environment for Black customers and employees. (Brooklyn Reader)

15 New York City pools that will be reopening in August. (Jenna Fanelli for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s what a car-free, pedestrian-friendly NYC could look like., according to a plan from Architect Vishaan Chakrabarti and his firm Practice for Architecture and Urbanism. (Davin Gannon 6sqft)

Another look at the mass die-offs of fish in the Hudson river. A combination of sewage being dumped into the waters, lack of rain, and the heat are creating an extreme situation leading to the massive deaths of fish. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Wo Hop returns today for takeout orders. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Who isn’t filling out their census forms? It might be the rich. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Jose Barrera, a 50-year-old Brooklyn man was fatally run over in Borough Park while unloading his car outside his home on Saturday night. The driver was taken into custody, passed a DWI test, and was released without being charged Barrera is the 29th pedestrian to be killed by someone driving a car in 2020. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Video: Drone footage of NYC’s Black Lives Matter murals. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is suspended until July 19. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

22 public libraries in the city are reopening today. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

14 unique outdoor dining options. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 3, 2020 – The “Hey Kid, Want To Buy A Baseball Team?” July 4th Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: July 4th subway and bus schedules, the St. James Place dance parties, the NYPD refuses to hand over bodycam footage, where to hang out by the water, & more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 90˚
Rain in the evening.
This weekend – Low: 72˚ High: 87˚

The Briefly turns two years old today!

Here is the MTA’s July 4th weekend beach subway and bus schedule. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

On the night of July 4th, we’ll be able to see a buck moon and a lunar eclipse. Don’t be so impressed with the buck moon part, all that means is that it’s the first full moon in July. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

RIP Free Slurpee Day 2020. (Fanni Frankl for amNewYork Metro)

Want to buy the Mets? You have until July 9 to place your bid. Can we start a Go FundMe? (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Eight tips for dining outside right now at NYC restaurants. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

More than 20 streets closed to cars citywide will now be dedicated to outdoor dining starting this weekend and lasting every weekend through Labor Day. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

The High Line will reopen on July 16 with a limited capacity. (NY1)

New York City families will be able to keep their children home this fall and opt for a full remote school schedule regardless of medical need. 25% of students surveyed said they were “very” comfortable returning to school. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

Alternate side parking will be suspended from July 5 through the 12. The reason given is the pandemic and trying to keep people from making unnecessary trips. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNew York Metro)

Video: Exploring the origins of the St. James Place in Clinton Hill nightly 7 pm dance party. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

New York is no longer on track to contain the coronavirus as infection numbers surge to record new highs across the country. At this rate, herd immunity is possible, but it will take years to set it. CT, MA, RI, and VT are on the list of states on the path to contain the virus. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

One of the big questions coming out of the pandemic is its effect on the city’s real estate and it looks like we’re starting to get hints of what’s to come. Median sales prices in Manhattan fell 17.7% compared to this time last year and the volume of sales dropped 54%. (Stefanos Chen and Sydney Franklin for NY Times)

Astoria’s Artopolis Bakery, Gussy’s Bar, and Monika’s Cafe-Bar are now among the 4% of the city’s restaurants and bars that have permanently closed since March. (Loulou Chryssides for Give Me Astoria)

Do NYC is attempting to compile a list of permanently closed bars and restaurants. (Do NYC)

By the time Governor Cuomo announced day camps could operate this summer and release safety guidelines for them, it was less than a month to their start date. Hundreds of applications for camps from the city rolled into Albany and there hasn’t been enough time for the Health Department to properly review them before being approved, so the summer started with over 225 camp applications sitting in limbo. (Reuven Blau for The City)

You can see the new exhibition Art on the Grid across the city on 500 bus shelters and 1,700 LinkNYC kiosks. The exhibit explores healing and loss, community and isolation, intimacy and solitude, and inclusivity and exclusivity. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times highlights the importance of the bike protests that have spring up around the city since Memorial Day weekend. (Troy Closson and Sean Piccoli for NY Times)

The Times, feeling optimistic, asks: Could New York finally become a bike city? (Sasha von Oldershausen for NY Times)

Photos: The city’s first day with open beaches. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Meet Whitney Hu, a candidate looking to succeed Carlos Menchaca for City Council for District 38, the district at the center of the Industry City rezoning fight. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

The city will spend $80 million toward the reconstruction of 70 Mulberry St, which was destroyed by fire in January, including many items from the Museum of Chinese in America. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Looking to get married but don’t want to leave your car? Now you can get married in a drive-thru. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Photos: Hundreds of people marched from Bay Ridge to the Barclays Center as a part of the international “Day of Rage” ªin opposition to Israel’s occupation and annexation of Palestine. (Meaghan McGoldrick, photos by Paul Frangipane for Brooklyn Paper)

Video: A one-minute explanation of why some animals thrive in NYC and some flounder. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A first look at a proposed mixed-use development on the Astoria/Long Island City that will take up five blocks with twelve buildings that are being called “Innovation QNS,” which is an awful name. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

During the construction of a seawall to protect a train yard in Inwood from another Hurricane Sandy, the MTA unearthed a patrol torpedo boat from the Harlem River that was once commanded by John F. Kennedy. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

How many times have you ridden a subway to the end of a line? Exploring the end of the 2 line. (Roger Clark for NY1)

The problem with asking your employees for their feedback is that they know that you heard it. When WNYC’s newsroom was asked who should lead their daily news coverage them after the harassment and discrimination that plagued the newsroom was brought to light, the answer was clear: a person of color who understood New York, with experience in public radio. Their new boss? A white woman from California with no public radio experience. (Ginia Bellafante for NY Times)

The state is rolling back some of its bail reforms, which took hold six months ago. More charges will be eligible for bail and more categories will be eligible for bail, which will result in more people being sent to jail, which has become an extremely dangerous place to be during the pandemic. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A Blue Lives Matter rally in the Bronx, as you might expect, quickly devolved into the participants screaming obscenities and threatening protesters. Yes, there is video. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea says the City Council bowed to “mob rule” when it came to the city’s budget. Mayor de Blasio, never one to not put his foot in his mouth, defended Shea’s comments. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

The NYPD has refused to hand over 1,137 requests for body camera footage, according to the Civilian Complaint Review Board, which has made investigating complaints “untenable.” It’s this kind of bullshit response for the NYPD, who refuses to take accountability for their actions, that brought us to this moment, where the public’s trust in them has eroded and created the NYPD-led violence during the George Floyd protests. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Making the case for a subway stop in Harlem to be named after Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, who collected one of the world’s largest libraries of African American books, prints, and artifacts and whose collection became the basis for the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library’s Division of Negro Literature, History, and Prints. (Wilfredo Florentino for Streetsblog)

17 outdoor bars and restaurants to hang out at by the water. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 15, 2020 – The “Not Understanding the Reality of NYC” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo signs police reforms, the monetary cost of Covid-19, the week without the NYPD, Bed-Stuy’s Black Lives Matter street mural, and more

Today – Low: 61˚ High: 73˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Still waiting for your absentee ballot for the June 23 primary? You’re not alone. (Christine Chung for The City)

Here’s what to do if you’ve applied and haven’t gotten your absentee ballot for the June 23 primary. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Meet the six challengers to incumbent State Senators and Assembly Members among StreetsPAC’s 24 endorsements for the June 23 primary. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

Here’s your guide to the June 23 Manhattan primary ballot. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Mayor de Blasio’s appropriation of Black pain has suited his political ambitions, but when it’s been time to walk the walk, he’s tripped, stumbled, or changed directions. As a result, his Black supporters are abandoning him. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

“I think anyone who questions the ability of this city government to do what we’re here to do and my ability as mayor to use the tools of city government even in a time of crisis doesn’t really understand the reality of New York City.” I might believe the mayor if he said that about me, but I don’t believe him when he’s talking about the city’s Public Advocate Jumaane Williams and City Councilmember Donovan Richards. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Photos: Let’s be clear. If you were one of the people out in the street on St. Marks over the weekend, you’re a complete asshole. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

After an eternity of quarantine, a summer reading list emerges. (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

With nothing else to do, we’ve descended on the parks. When we found the parks, we all found them together and searched for our own spaces to attempt to maintain the distance that we were told to. With our dogs at our sides, we found little patches where we thought we could let our dogs off their leashes, because “they’re good dogs.” Little did we know that we found our way into and disturbed the domains of the birds and the bird watchers. (David Kobe for Bedford + Bowery)

Tired of Tinder and Plenty of Fish and Farmers Only and Make Out Club? Business is bananas for match makers. (Angi Gonzalez for NY1)

The governor gave the state’s day camps the go-ahead, but the de Blasio administration is completely unprepared to help make the city’s camps a reality. (Jessica Gould and David Cruz for Gothamist)

Revel is expanding, again, this time adding its electric mopeds to portions of the Bronx. (Jason Cohen for Bronx Times)

Ever want to rent a diner? Now (not NOW but in 2021) you can rent out the Golden Diner with the proceeds supporting the Brooklyn Rescue Mission. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Pop-up drive-in movie experiences are going to be to this summer what pop-up pools were to last summer. (Regan Mies for amNewYork Metro)

Heads up, Manhattanhenge is coming on July 11 and 12. Maybe this is a great year to skip it, as there’s pretty much one spot in the entire city to get a good view and we’re still gonna be trying to keep our distance from each other in a month. (StreetEasy)

When Paramedic Megan Pfeiffer was interviewed on TV about how EMTs were sleeping in their cars to prevent potentially spreading Covid-19, she was rewarded by the FDNY by having her uniform taken away from her, according to a lawsuit. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Have you been hearing drag racing out your windows? You’re not the only one, complaints about drag racing has quadrupled during the Covid-19 pandemic. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

The hundreds of contact tracing workers hired by the city under de Blasio’s new “test and trace” campaign have been instructed not to ask anyone who’s tested positive for COVID-19 whether they recently attended a demonstration in the last few weeks. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

How much does it cost to recover from Covid-19? For Janet Mendez, the cost is $401,885.57. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

At a rate of infection of 0.77, New York has the lowest infection rate in the country. The governor attributes this to the slow reopening process. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Ellie Murray, an epidemiologist at Boston University, is worried that recent protests will spike Covid-19 cases. Murray isn’t worried that the protesters will spread is amongst themselves, but specifically, the police’s interactions with protesters is the problem. The police were the ones not wearing face masks, the police were the ones forcing protesters to stand close to one another, and it was the police spraying protesters with chemicals designed to cause respiratory issues. (Chloe K. Li for Gothamist)

All New York police forces must “reinvent” their departments or risk losing state funding as part of sweeping reform legislation Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed into law Friday. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

There is a call to change the name of Christopher Columbus Park in Downtown Brooklyn and to remove the statue from the park. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

What’s NYC without the police? It’s happened before. A look back at the police strike of 1971. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The NYPD is guarding the Christopher Columbus statue in Columbus Circle. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Aakash Patel is creating an archive of NYC traffic camera feeds in the hopes that if another incident happens involving the NYPD, there will be additional cameras capturing what happened. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A billion dollars is a lot of money, here’s what a billion dollars from the NYPD budget could do for housing in NYC. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

A look at the five investigations into the NYPD’s conduct against protesters. (Yasmeen Chan for Gothamist)

A double-parked car on Park Avenue in The Bronx began a chain of events that caused the death of a cyclist on Thursday afternoon — but the NYPD neither charged the driver of the illegally parked car or the driver of the truck that killed the bike user. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

A partial look at the NYPD’s awful stewardship of Vision Zero. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Photos: Bed-Stuy has its own 375-foot long Black Lives Matter street painting at Restoration Plaza on Fulton St and New York Ave. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo signed a package of police reform bills into law on Friday, which included a ban on chokeholds, the repeal of 50a, and others. While this is a good step forward, I hope that the governor and state legislature doesn’t believe that this is mission accomplished. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

A look at the street art celebrating the life of George Floyd. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

After nearly seven weeks, the National Park Service has reopened Floyd Bennett Field to the public. It had become a makeshift parking lot of MTA buses. (Gabriel Sandoval for The City)

One time when I was apartment hunting I watched an agent jump over a fence so he could crawl through a window so he could show me an apartment after he “left the keys in the office.” How to avoid being the victim of a rental scam. (Alicia Schwartz for StreetEasy)

Systemic racism, poor management, intimidating non-disclosure agreements, and a culture of fear. This isn’t the Trump organization, we’re talking about The Wing. A detailed history. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

Thanks to the rush of white people suddenly interested in Black history and systemic racism, independent bookstores are struggling to keep up with the volume of books being ordered, but to quote Kalima DeSuze of Cafe con Libros, “W would prefer that he still be alive and I still be struggling.” (Karen Rouse for Gothamist)

NYC restaurants selling groceries and meal kits. (Bryan Kim & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)