The Briefly for August 30, 2020 – The “There’s A Great Hot Dog Stand Nearby” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A four-way city schools standoff, what to expect as museums open across the city, where to eat after 11pm, trash in parks, and more

Today – Low: 65˚ High: 80˚
Clear throughout the day.

Wondering what the hell was going on with those fireworks over the Hudson on Thursday night right around 11 pm ? Those were a part of MTV’s Video Music Awards. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

With the first of the month right around the corner, here’s what you should know about rent concessions. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Headlines about New York having the lowest infection rates in six months area great, but they are no reason to relax about following the guidelines. These headlines are literally the reason to stay strict. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The mayor’s plan to reopen the schools is a gamble, and he’s gambling with the health of students, teachers, and staff. With the numbers being as low as they are at the moment, it may look safe, but it’s still a gamble that doesn’t yet have the complete support of the teachers’ union. As we get closer and closer to September 10, we face a showdown between the United Federation of Teachers, who may still call for a strike over safety concerns, the mayor’s office, the City Council, which plans to call for a delay, and Governor Cuomo, who could still step in and overrule the mayor’s decision. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

When colleges in the state have 100 cases in two weeks or the total cases equal 5% of the on-campus population, the entire school will go into remote learning for two weeks. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Museum of Natural History plans on opening next month, but those plans could be derailed by a dispute with its union over privacy concerns. The museum wants its employees to use an app to track Covid-19 symptoms using an app whose data is not protected by HIPPA. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

MoMA PS1 will reopen on September 17. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

A guide to MoMA and the Met. (NY Times)

Photos: A first look at the Met’s new Roof Garden Commission Lattice Detour by Héctor Zamora. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

What to expect when heading back to a museum for the first time since March. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Yeah, the Met is opening, but more importantly, the Hot Dog King is back. These kinds of stories seem inconsequential, people who truly love New York have little bits of knowledge that have been obliterated by the pandemic. These kinds of stories are the ones that defy the narrative that the city is, ahem, “dead.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

“Have you not walked the streets? Have you not seen the people here? Born here, bred here, living and breathing here. They are scrappy, scared, hungry, and tired, but more importantly, they’re pissed. If anything the rebel cry of thousands, millions, fighting to live is what should terrify anyone that dare declare us dead.”
– Ariama C. Long, Who The Fuck Are You To Tell Me My City’s Dead for Kings County Politics

The argument that laughs in the face of the modern “Why I left New York” essay. (Talmon Joseph Smith for The Atlantic)

The House of Yes’ liquor license was suspended. The center of the suspension seems to be centered around the House of Yes not offering food directly, but relying on a “sister” restaurant and seemingly pleading ignorance of how the rules worked in addition to playing loud music. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Check out the designs for the Brooklyn park dedicated to LGBTQ advocate Marsha P. Johnson. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

At the RNC, President Trump made some assertions about crime in New York City. Here are the facts. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Speaking of the RNC, multiple New Yorkers who are NYCHA residents were featured in a video during the convention without their knowledge. They have come forward to let everyone know they are not Trump supporters and were tricked into appearing the in the video. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

MSG will be used as a polling site in November’s election thanks to the deal the NBA players’ union made with the league’s owners. There hasn’t been any word about the Barclays Center yet. (Faraz Toor for NY1)

In a move to attempt to stave off clerical problems in a similar fashion to the ones that were ever-present in the June primaries, Governor Cuomo signed and tweaked legislation that will notify voters of issues with their ballots that can be fixed within seven days of being notified. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD officer Henry Vidal was arrested in March for beating his partner inside her Harlem apartment. He was suspended without pay and ordered to stay away from the woman. On Friday he violated that order and reportedly pulled a gun on her and threatened to kill her inside her sister’s home. He was arrested and is still suspended without pay. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s new chokehold ban is a month old and already the City Council is bowing to the NYPD and is considering amending it. The NYPD is banned from sitting, kneeling, or standing on someone’s chest or back that compresses the diaphragm. The NYPD wants to add the word “recklessly” to the wording, which is a loophole big enough to drive an NYPD SUV straight through. (NY1)

This is the NYPD, which has no problem recklessly parking and blocking bus stops. (Jose Martinez for The City)

This is the same NYPD that has been occupying streets adjacent to precincts since June and has recently gone as far as setting up “checkpoints” on their needlessly occupied streets. (Nick Garber for Patch)

It’s hard to imagine our idiot mayor enforcing anything when his motorcade blocked a waterfront bike lane so he could make an announcement about ferries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Trash complaints are up 120% in the city’s parks. The city’s solution is an advertising campaign urging people to throw out their trash. While I can appreciate the effort, actually maintaining the parks may go further than asking people politely, but with an $84 million budget cut, ads in LinkNYC kiosks might be as good as we can get. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you want to see President Trump wearing a mask (a facemask, not a leather gimp mask you sickos), the only place you’ll be able to see it is in Madame Tussauds in Times Square. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Punjabi Deli on Houston is open for the first time in four months. The food is legendary, especially for vegans and vegetarians. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The city added six more streets for outdoor dining in Boerum Hill, Garment District, Flatiron, Harlem, and Astoria. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

‘Tis the season for billionaires to form shady coalitions and astroturfed “advocacy” to fight the idea that the rich should be taxed, if not eaten whole. It almost worked, but their partners are all withdrawing after being outed as possibly bankrolled by a billionaire Republican. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Thinking about starting a food business? How about shelling out for this space shuttle food truck? It was formerly a DC-3 airliner and has a full-service, commercial kitchen, restroom, and cockpit. You’ll have to sell a lot of astronaut ice cream to afford the $149,000 price point. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Congrats to Mayor de Blasio, who is overseeing a city that is giving thousands of parking tickets to its frontline nurses, despite explicitly giving them parking placards to avoid getting tickets. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

At the beginning of the year, it seemed like we had three front-runners for 2021’s mayoral race with Comptroller Scott Stringer, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. Three men and two of them are white. The Times asks do New York City voters want another white mayor? (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Where to eat outside after 11pm. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 28, 2020 – The “Someone Knows Your Pandemic Secret” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Please shut up, the shifting definition of “bar food,” the most checked out book from the NYPL, new restaurant openings, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 92˚
Rain in the evening.

The New York Liberty and Seattle Storm have set the bar for National Anthem protests. Rather than take a knee, both teams walked off the court completely. After a 26 second silence in honor of Breonna Taylor, the teams left. Will anyone else step up or will the Liberty reign as the most badass team in NY? (Lam Thuy Vo for BuzzFeed News)

How to move a couch in or out of a small apartment. (Zachary Soloman for StreetEasy)

Our tailors know our dirty little pandemic secret. We all got fat. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

How to get into Gramercy Park, the most exclusive park in the city, where only 383 keys exist for its locks. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Busking is tough. Busking during a pandemic is even tougher. Now, imagine busking while carrying around a 900-pound piano. (Alex Vadukul and September Dawn Bottoms for NY Times)

An occupational therapist makes the argument that students should be learning outdoors this fall. (Lisa Raymond-Tolan for Chalkbeat)

Elizabeth Street Garden’s Executive Director Joseph Reiver offers up the Elizabeth Street Garden for schools to use. (Joseph Reiver For Bowery Boogie)

Wish the city was still open despite the pandemic? They tried keeping things open to keep up New Yorkers’ spirits. It didn’t go great for the city. (Laura Collins-Hughes for NY Times)

There’s a state law preventing public employees from striking, but NYC public school teachers are devising ways to push back if forced to teach in-person classes in the fall. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

This will be the first year that on 9/11, the names of the victims will not be read by members of their families. (NY1)

All abord the sludge boat! With Covid-19 in our poops, the boat that carries those poops away from the city is one of the most important boats in the city. (Roger Clark for NY1)

Apartment Porn: It’s $9.9 million on the Upper East Side, 5,000 square feet, nearly 21-foot tall ceilings, a 40-foot garden, and a private parking garage. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

What is food? While this is a dumb question, at this point the State Liquor Authority is making me wonder what is even food. The constantly shifting definition of what food can be served with alcohol from the SLA is maddening. Let us have our booze or don’t, but don’t make me order a sandwich with my shot. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Farewell to La Caridad 78, a Chinese-Cuban restaurant that’s been open for 52 years on the Upper West Side is closing for good. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Le Sia, the Chinese-Cajun restaurant in the East Village. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Farewell to the Rusty Knot in the West Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Chumley’s in the West Village, two years shy of its centennial. There was an auction for most of what was inside the bar, but the auction was canceled, further confusing the situation. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Photos: A look at Saturday’s Unite NY 2020 rally with the Street Riders, Warriors in the Garden, and the Black Chef Movement, which marched from Cadman Plaza in Brooklyn to Times Square and beyond. (Emmy Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

“New York’s recovery won’t be demonstrated by restoring the city to peak car traffic. Peak traffic never reflected New York’s full potential before the pandemic, it limited it. A car-based recovery would suck the oxygen out of the city and suffocate the city. Normal in New York is founded on the principle of independent transportation and the freedom of not needing a car to live and work in the city.”
-Janette Sadik-Khan, former NYC transportation commissioner, Why The Pandemic Represents A Historic Opportunity For NYC Streets, for Gothamist

A new memorial at the Williamsburg waterfront pays homage to almost 200 Black people who have been killed by police or have died fighting against racial injustice. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Riddle me this: When you Google “Waterbury Metro-North,” did the official MTA site read “Flirtatious Anal Dildo For Cock Hungry Blonde Slut?” (David Brand for Queens Eagle)

Will you please shut the hell up? Noise complaints are up 300% since February. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Queens, what’s up? Why has half of Queens not responded to the Census? (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Maybe it’s time to address the Native American in a loincloth on New York City’s official seal? (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

This one went right under my nose. A federal judge blocked the NYCLU from releasing the NYPD disciplinary records, but on the same day, ProPublica released a searchable database of the disciplinary records. ProPublica says they were allowed to post the database because they aren’t involved in the union lawsuit challenging the release of the records. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Twenty-seven New York City bars and restaurants on Sunday were cited by state inspectors for social distancing and other coronavirus-related violations. The state hasn’t released the list of bars and restaurants. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo is on top of the NYPL’s list of most checked out books during the lockdown. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

“They send me their keys and say, ‘Pack it up and put it in storage and we’ll figure it out later.’ There are so many people in flux.” Vacancy rates are growing throughout the city and how it could put the city’s rent regulation in jeopardy. (Greg David for The City)

19 new restaurant openings you should know about. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 21, 2020 – The “Don’t Make Me Turn This Car Around” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Night and weekend subway construction returns next month, Domino Park gets private security, the new owner of Ample Hills, and more

Today – Low: 77˚ High: 89˚
Humid throughout the day.

Video: Walking through Occupy City Hall. (Action Kid)

Apartment Porn: A $4 million townhouse in Windsor Terrace with an inground saltwater pool. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Reducing service, slashing the transit workforce, scrapping planned infrastructure improvements, raising tolls beyond scheduled increases, and some of the other “hard choices no matter what happens” at the MTA over the next few years with a projected $16 billion loss. (Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

The pandemic is making more New Yorkers consider buying cars. (Mark Hallum for amNewyork Metro)

There’s never been a better time to have contactless payment on the subways. OMNY is available throughout the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

It feels like we haven’t heard anything about subway closures for construction in forever, but here we are. The F line’s Rutgers Tube, which connects Brooklyn and Manhattan, will close nights and weekends starting in August through the spring to finish Hurricane Sandy repairs and fortification. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Governor Cuomo is going full-on “don’t make me turn this car around” when it comes to bar and restaurant openings. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

Mayor de Blasio saw the video of a homeless man being punched in the face by an NYPD and decided that everyone and no one is to blame for the situation continuing his longstanding tradition of never taking a stand on anything and upsetting everyone on every side of every situation. A true ally to nobody. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Pulling the enforcement of the city’s Open Streets away from the NYPD and asking community partners to take over was supposed to make things easier. Now, the NYPD are harassing volunteers. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Apparently asking that the NYPD stop beating and killing New Yorkers is too much to ask if you’re NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea. (Joe Jurado for The Root)

“The NYPD demands accountability from everyone but themselves. The Department refuses to require personnel to attend virtual misconduct hearings or provide body camera footage to investigators. Officers without masks beat masked demonstrators on video, after weeks of sometimes-violent mask-wearing enforcement, then insisted that more cops were essential for public safety.”
– Maryanne Kaishian, senior policy counsel at Brooklyn Defender Services, Cops continue misinformation campaign to smear policies they don’t like for Brooklyn Eagle

The widely cited and incorrect talking point of a politician who is trying to convince their constituents that using tax dollars to pay for a sports stadium is beneficial for the neighborhood. The Yankees received $1.186 billion in public money and tax breaks to build their new stadium in 2009. Eleven years later, the Yankees pay no property taxes on an estimated $5 billion of city-owned land, the Bronx will not see any baseball fans in 2020, and the neighborhood surrounding Yankee stadium is economically dying, with the average merchant behind on rent to the tune of $60,000. This year, the Yankees signed pitched Gerrit Cole for $324 million. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

Deep in the city’s budget is 4.1 million dedicated to supporting people involved in the sex trade, but what does that even mean? (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

An interview with Brian Nagy, an NYC teacher in the school system’s remote teaching pilot program that says remote learning may, in some form, be here to stay. (Gabrielle Birkner for Chalkbeat)

What to expect in phase four. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The FDNY had to save two people whose inflatable swan drifted into the East River and began sinking. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

RIP Jerry Wolkoff, the man best known as the developer that demolished 5Pointz. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

The 7 best hikes near New York City. (Rebecca Fishbein for 6sqft)

RIP Nina Kapur, CBS2 reporter who died after a moped crash in Manhattan. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Interview: Michael Zapata, the new owner of Ample Hills on why a guy who manufactures precision lasers in Oregon just bought an ice cream company in Brooklyn. (Joshua David Stein for Grub Street)

Apartment Porn: A $3.5 million townhouse with an “enchanted garden” backyard, six fireplaces, and private parking. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Sheldon Silver, the former New York State Assembly speaker, is going to prison for 78 months after being convicted on corruption charges. (Benjamin Weiser and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Why the hell does Domino Park, a public space, have private security guards posted at its entrances? (Ben Weiss for Greenpointers)

Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group restaurants are ending their move towards no-tipping policies. Meyer believes tipping contributes to inequitable pay, wage instability, and other problems. He says he’s ending the policies because “guests want to tip generously right now.” That’s extending a lot of trust, considering it’s not his income he’s making policies about. (Julia Moskin for NY Times)

The president is threatening to send federal agents to the city to “keep this city safe.” We have heard some awful ideas this year, each dumber than the last, but I can’t ever imagine this ending well. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The William Vale’s pool is now open to the public with the price tag starting at a hefty $75 for a few hours and going up to $500 for two people. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Check out this wonderful pen and ink cityscape from artist Kaylie Fairclough. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A call for Mayor de Blasio to shut off the lights so the city can see the comet Neowise. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Wait times for results for Covid-19 tests across the city are slipping. The free tests available at the city’s publicly run hospital network are beyond the advertised 3-5 days and are drifting towards the two-week territory. (Anastassia Gliadkovskaya for The City)

Attention mallrats: Indoor malls are still closed. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

A deeper look at the temporary hospital that was built at U.S.T.A. Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, which cost $52 and treated 79 patients. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

Where to eat dim sum outdoors in Chinatown. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)