The Briefly for July 23, 2020 – The “Abolition Park, Abolished” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Facial recognition ban in schools, de Blasio’s Open Streets plan “lacks ambition,” the NYPD’s misuse of plastic handcuffs, where to eat outdoors, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 89˚
Possible light rain in the evening and overnight.

Congrats to Emily Gallagher for defeating 47-year incumbent Joe Lentol in the election for the state assemblymember in the 50th district. (Greenpointers)

With a return date for theater in New York City a complete unknown, Off-Broadway’s Playroom Theater in Times Square closed for good. (Matt Windman for amNewYork Metro)

Mayor de Blasio’s Open Streets plan “lacks vision and ambition,” just like the mayor himself. Instead of supplementing the city’s transportation and economy, Open Streets is a disconnected network with management challenges and does little to help. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

With a legislative session starting, expect the fight over nursing homes to be center stage for legislation. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

There will be no use of facial recognition in New York schools until 2022 at the earliest thanks to a new bill created in the state legislature. This was in response to a school district upstate introducing facial recognition into all of its schools. (Kyle Wiggers for VentureBeat)

In the early hours of Wednesday morning, the NYPD cleared out Abolition Park, the center of the City Hall occupation, in a move that was reminiscent of the NYPD’s clearing out fo Occupy Wall Street. (Jen Chung, Jake Offenhartz, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio says it was coincidental that City Hall Park was cleared out shortly after President Trump threatened to send federal troops to New York City and the raid on Abolition Park has been planned for weeks. Let’s not forget that Mayor de Blasio implemented city-wide curfews to prevent Governor Cuomo from stepping in. (Rocco Vertuccio for NY1)

The city’s defense against federal agents? Lawsuits. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

15 public pools will start reopening in NYC, eight this Friday and seven on August 1. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz says three Queens residents and a man from Virginia have been arrested in connection with a gun trafficking operation in which dozens of firearms were purchased legally in Virginia but then sold illegally in Queens. (Ron Lee for amNewyork Metro)

The NYPD won’t strip the officer caught on video punching a homeless man on the subway of any duties, but will be put on “modified duty.”All from the same NYPD commissioner that praised the NYPD for “incredible restraint” during the George Floyd protests. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Photos: Inside Susan Sarandon’s $7.9 million Chelsea duplex. Is that a bathtub in the bedroom? Yes it is. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The myMTA app will now include information about how crowded buses are. (Adam Light for Streetsblog)

The city’s Doughnut Plant locations are closed due to financial fallout from Covid-19. This isn’t a permanent closure, but temporary while owner Mark Israel secures funding to reopen (hopefully) in September. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Interviews with four restaurant owners on why to-go windows feel safer than table service. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

NYPD officer Joseph Recca was arrested and charged with conspiracy, drug sales, and drug possession in connection with an Oxycodone ring and a fatal overdose of a Long Island man last September. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Photo Preview: The Frieze Sculpture at Rockefeller Center will return on September 1 with works of art by Ghada Amer, Beatriz Cortez, Andy Goldsworthy, Lena Henke, Camille Henrot and Thaddeus Mosley. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Exploring the idea of what would happen if there was a major blackout in the city. ConEd says there is an overall lowered use of energy due to all of the empty office buildings and businesses, but the NYC Prepper’s Group is getting ready anyway. Yup, of course there’s an NYC Prepper’s Group. (Virginia Breen for The City)

Despite recommendations to review their use of plastic cuffs, the NYPD continues to use them while making arrests, often leaving people in cuffs too tight for hours on end, threatening permanent damage. (Peter Senzamici for The City)

A look back at the city’s lost amusement parks. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Are you starved for some social distance? How about taking a canoe tour of the Gowanus Canal? (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Where to eat outside in Williamsburg. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The city’s $3 million Graffiti-Free NYC program was cut from the city’s budget. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Modern Pinball on Third Avenue is closing due to pandemic-related financial hardship. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

10 iconic streets and spots in NYC open for outdoor dining. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Thanks to reader Lisa for today’s featured photo of the storm that postponed John Trivialta at Parklife and A League of Their Own until Sunday night.

The Briefly for July 14, 2020 – The “Like Noise Canceling for Your Open Windows” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: All politics is beans, the NYPD protects a Blue Lives Matter rally, marriage can wait (it has to), the Mets have a possible buyer, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 85˚
Clear throughout the day.

10 things you must know about NYC before moving here. It’s probably too late for all of you. Do you know these things? #1 is “It’s expensive,” so you probably know that one. (Localize.City)

Shake Shack gave its PPP loan back. Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group fired 2,000 of its 2,300 employees in March and used different LLCs to apply and receive loans between $11.4 million and $27 million. (Matthew Schuerman with research by Jake Dobkin and Megan Zerez for Gothamist)

It’s not ready for purchase, but researchers in Singapore have developed an early version of noise canceling headphones for your apartment windows. (David Waldstein for NY Times)

Goya is at the center of politics in 2020, a statement no one saw coming, from Republican Nicole Malliotakis’s Goya canned food drive to AOC publishing an Adobo recipe. This is all because the CEO of Goya said the USA is “truly blessed” to have a leader like President Trump. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

The White Horse Tavern, which openly flaunted the state’s social distancing guidelines, had its liquor license temporarily suspended. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Looking for a break from everyday life? Six unique NYC Airbnbs. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Looking to get married in the city? You’re gonna have to wait. Appointments to get a license using the city’s “Project Cupid” site has a backlog that stretches on for months. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Davell Gardner, a 1-year-old boy, was shot dead at a BBQ in Bed-Stuy at the Raymond Bush playground on Sunday night. Three other people were shot, but are expected to survive. (NY1)

If C.K. McWhorter’s $1.8 billion bid to buy the Mets goes through, he would become the only black owner in Major League Baseball. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Trigg Brown — the chef and co-owner of one of NYC’s most buzzed-about restaurants, Win Son — is temporarily stepping away from day-to-day operations after employees leveled allegations that he fostered a hostile workplace. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Black Lives Matter mural outside of Trump Tower was already defaced. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Sunday on the beach at Coney Island was a great example of a failure to socially distance. In a neighborhood without Open Streets or many parks, the beach is the only viable place to gather outdoors. (Ariama C. Long for Kings County Politics)

Say hello to Chi Ossé, an activist running for City Council in the 36th District and the youngest candidate to ever run for City Council. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

36 members of the City Council are calling on Joe Borelli, a City Councilmember from Staten Island, to apologize after his obviously racist attack on the celebration. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

It seems the city has finally rid itself of a noted homophobe and City Councilmember Rubén Díaz Sr., whose Congressional bid was met with a responding “NOPE.” Díaz Sr. won’t be seeking office after his term is up in 2021. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

City Councilmember Helen Rosenthal is dropping out of the race for Comptroller in 2021, blaming her dropping out on the coronavirus pandemic. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance hasn’t announced if he’ll be seeking another term in office, but his list of challengers is growing. Despite making recent headlines with cases against President Trump and Harvey Weinstein, Vance’s office has garnered a lot of well-earned criticism for how it’s handled abuse cases against the rich and famous. (Jan Ransom for NY Times)

The five candidates vying for Vance’s job will participate in a forum today, essentially the race’s first debate, without Vance. (Andrew Millman for Gotham Gazette)

All travelers flying into airports in New York state will now have to fill out a form providing contact and itinerary information or face a $2,000 fine. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Strand’s new Upper West Side location opens on Wednesday, but rather than hiring more staff, the book store has fired a dozen of their recently rehired staffers. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD traffic agent Jeanisidor Jean Baptiste was arrested in Brooklyn after an investigation uncovered years of alleged sexual abuse to a five-year-old girl from 2008 through 2012. The victim is now 17. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

If the NYPD is called on to keep the peace during rival Black Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter protests, who do you think they’ll defend? On Sunday in Bay Ridge, the NYPD made two arrests after Blue Lives Matter protesters attacked the Black Lives Matter protesters. Both men arrested were Black. (Jake Offenhartz and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Sex workers joined together outside of the Stonewall Inn on July 9 to rally against police brutality and send a message that sex work is work. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

A new bill is calling for a ban of the NYPD’s use of drones for recording or collecting data on the general public in open spaces. The bill also restricts the use of drones without a warrant and bans facial recognition, and is sponsored by State Senator Jessica Ramos. (NY1)

It was a few days of good news about Covid-19 infections in New York, so it’s time to tamp that down a bit. There’s a new spike in infections in New Yorkers in their 20s. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s nice to think that the city really had zero Covid-19 deaths on Saturday, but that’s probably not true. The way the city assigns death dates means that we won’t actually know for a few days. Over the last week, there have been 12 confirmed Covid-19 deaths, and one probable death each day. (Jen Carlson and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Schools can reopen in the fall for regions in phase four and have infection rates below 5%, according to the guidelines set forward by Governor Cuomo. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

It’s not all good news for schools. If the city’s infection rate surges past 9% later in August or after the school year starts, schools will be forced to close. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

For months following Amazon’s decision to pull out, we felt forgotten and it appeared that our goal of creating a Long Island City waterfront that would empower our community and create a significant number of jobs was lost. Then last year, a new process emerged.
-Carol Wilkins, April Simpson-Taylor, Claudia Coger & Annie Cotton-Morris, NYCHA Tenant Leaders: Where Amazon Never Arrived, New Opportunity Arises for Gotham Gazette

6 Manhattan homes with their own private pools and hot tubs. Must be nice. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

It was only a matter of time. A driver crashed his car into an outdoor dining area on Roosevelt Ave in Queens. Four diners and a server were injured. (Justine Re for NY1)

16 places to pick up food news Prospect Park has a few good gems, even if a few of them are laughably far away and other picks ignore where the park’s entrances are. (Nikko Duren & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Micah Eames for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 10, 2020 – The “Everyone Can Hear Your Phone Conversation” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city paints another Black Lives Matter mural, the zoos are reopening, Manhattanhenge, all public events are canceled until September 30, and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 78˚
Heavy rain and humid throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 74˚ High: 86˚

This weekend is your last chance to see Manhattanhenge this year. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Video: Looking to turn your apartment into an indoor garden oasis? Here are some tips and tricks to turn your black thumb green. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Predictably, Mayor de Blasio doesn’t like Attorney General James’ plan to move control of the NYPD under a commission. This might be the biggest endorsement to move forward with this plan. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

If you event needs a city-issued permit between now and September 30, it’s canceled. All events in the city are canceled, with exceptions for some street fairs, events in parks, and events smaller than one block. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

It used to be that NYC’s public spaces were where you could go to take a private phone call. The city’s indifference towards any individual person was an asset if you were in a restaurant or at work and needed to have a conversation, Now? Our public space has become more valuable than ever and in the comparative spareness of the streets, you can’t find the same level of anonymity. Now, when you’re on the phone while waiting outside a Trader Joe’s, not only can everyone hear you, they’ll make signs to inform you that your conversations aren’t private. (Judith Newman for NY Times)

Centre Street in Lower Manhattan has been co-named Black Lives Matter Boulevard. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

The city painted a Black Lives Matter mural in front of Trump Tower, which is a nice gesture, but I worry that the city’s government has lost sight of their goals in pursuit of public art projects. (Michael Gold and Daniel E. Slotnik for NY Times)

Many New York City Council members of color say that in their communities people aren’t screaming for police defunding or abolition. One wonders, did they just close their windows each time a #BlackLivesMatter protest marched by their house? It is true that this year’s #BlackLivesMatter protests have engaged far more white people than they did when Eric Garner was killed, but in response to those protests the Council voted through a budget that added 1,300 new police officers. What Black or Latino Council member can honestly say their communities were screaming “Build new jails!“ when they approved billions to do just that in 2019? (None.)
-Andrew J. Padilla, Member of Community Board 11, for Gotham Gazette. Deconstructing the #DefundNYPD Clash with City Council Members of Color

Remember when the NYPD said that the spike in shootings was caused by the city’s bail reforms? Well, the data is out and the NYPD lied, again. Only one person released was re-arrested for a shooting. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The MTA is getting back to work in their offices, check out their guide to getting back to work. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Here’s what to expect when the Museum of the City of New York reopens later this month. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Congrats to the winners of the Time Out Time In Awards. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

Restaurant Daniel, a Michelin-starred restaurant is jumping into outdoor dining, making it one of two starred restaurants still operating. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Photos: It’s been five years since the reopening of the High Bridge, which absolutely gorgeous, connects Manhattan to the Bronx, and is the city’s oldest surviving bridge. (Duane Bailey-Castro for Untapped New York)

In admiration of the city’s restaurants that have gotten creative with their outdoor dining setups. (Pete Wells and Karsten Moran for NY Times)

Photos: Michael Che has been hosting regular, outdoor, socially-distanced, pop-up comedy shows in Long Island City outside the Plaxall Gallery, working with The Creek and the Cave. The next show is July 15. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Lots of questions about masks, answered. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

No matter what the mayor says publicly, the Department of Education says it is too early for a plan to be in place for opening schools in the fall. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Take a look at the six finalists announced for the Brooklyn Bridge walkway redesign competition. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Bronx Zoo, Central Park Zoo, Prospect Park Zoo, Queens Zoo, and the New York Aquarium will reopen to members on July 20 and will open to the public on July 24. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Paulie Gee’s is offering takeout pies for the first time since 2014. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The Citi logo has been removed from One Court Square. (John Bolger for LIC Post)

After being temporarily released from prison, Michael Cohen is back behind bars and in custody to serve the rest of his sentence. (Maggie Haberman, William K. Rashbaum and Nicole Hong for NY Times)

No matter what safety precautions they’re taking, these rooftop pool parties in Long Island City don’t look safe. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Yes, some beaches are open, but some remain closed because the city has a shortage of lifeguards. (Rose Adams for amNewYork Metro)

How to always get your security deposit back. (Localize.City)