The Briefly for January 12-15, 2020 – The “No, You Don’t Gotta Say That” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Vaccines available for group 1b, the best Thai restaurants, the High Line will be extended, Andrew Yang puts his foot in his mouth, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 40˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

A list of who is eligible for the Covid-19 vaccine. Groups 1a and 1b are currently eligible. You can also call the vaccine hotline at 888-364-3065. (NYC.gov)

After failing to disburse more than half of the federal funding in a COVID-19 rent relief program, New York opened a new application window in order to hand out the remaining $60 million. The application closes at the end of January, so get moving. (Emily Lang for Gothamist)

Vice President for Manhattanville Development at Columbia University, Marcelo Velez, is accused of engaging in sex acts with a girl under the age of 13 inside his New Jersey home. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Sometimes you gotta say Heil Hitler” – Republican candidate for Staten Island Boro President Leticia Remauro is apologizing for accidentally saying the quiet part out loud during a video she posted online protesting the closure of Mac’s Public House. (Chris Sommerfeldt and Cathy Burke for Daily News)

The NYPD’s investigation into Deputy Inspector James F. Kobel, who oversaw the NYPD’s Equal Employment Opportunity Division, was using a pseudonym online to hide his racist posts in a police officer message board. Kobel, a coward, filed for retirement last week. (William K. Rashbaum and Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Nicole Malliotakis’ Bay Ridge office was greeted by hundreds of protesters over the weekend, showing her just how appreciated her opposition to certifying the election results is with her constituents. (Brian Braiker for Brooklyn Magazine)

An NYPD member is under investigation over accusations they participated in the attack on the Capitol. The mayor stated any city employee at the attack would be fired. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

William Pepe, a worker for Metro-North, “called out sick Wednesday to attend” the attack on the Capitol last week. He’s been suspended without pay pending an investigation. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

A look into the Home Alone group show at the ATM Gallery on Henry Street. (EV Grieve)

New York state is looking to enact a law that would fine food delivery apps for creating listings for restaurants without their written permission. GrubHub currently adds local restaurants without the restaurants’ permission when they see local “demand.” (Christopher Robins for Gothamist)

Lap dances, karaoke, and secret parties. The NYC speakeasies of Covid-19. (Mihir Zaveri for NY Times)

Real Estate Lust: Six bedrooms, a front porch, side porch, rear deck, a driveway, built-in 1899 $2.6 million house in Prospect Park South. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)


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Queens Public Defenders are attempting to unionize and their management is calling them a “mob.” (Sam Mellins for New York Focus, in partnership with The City)

Sammy Revelo, Retired NYPD Lieutenant, declared his candidacy for Bronx Boro President. (Nowrood News)

One advantage of having Community Board meetings virtually is that anyone can show up, like Chuck Schumer, who popped into a CB2 meeting on the day after the attack on the Capitol. Maybe he needed a break from everything happening that week. (Christian Murray for LIC Post)

Speaking of Chuck, here’s what his future as Senate Majority leader means for NYC. (Jesse McKinley and Christina Goldbaum for NY Times)

Video: Meet Violet Brill, a 16-year-old urban forager. (Daniela Sirtori-Cortina for Bedford + Bowery)

Esquire’s list “100 Restaurants American Can’t Afford To Lose” includes 12 NYC restaurants, including Proto’s Pizza, Keens, Bar Tabac, and nine more. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Prismatica, an immersive art installation consisting of 25 rainbow-like prisms between 39th and 40th streets. The installation is by RAW Design in collaboration with ATOMIC3. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

A supervisor for the NYCHA certified an apartment lead-free, but it was never actually inspected. Now a child has lead poisoning. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

“We live in a two-bedroom apartment in Manhattan. And so, like, can you imagine trying to have two kids on virtual school in a two-bedroom apartment, and then trying to do work yourself?” –Andrew Yang actually gave that quote to the Times about spending most of his time outside of New York City while he’s thinking about running for mayor of New York City. (Katie Glueck for NY Times)

14 hours later, Andrew Yang was on the defensive while all the other mayoral candidates saw an opportunity to pounce. (Katie Glueck for NY Times)

The city’s Independent Budget Office says that jobs won’t bounce back until at least 2024, but the state and city’s budget hole initially predicted wouldn’t be as bad as predicted. (Greg David for The City)

Dr. Fauci told the conference of the Association of Performing Arts Professionals that live concerts could return “some time in the fall of 2021,” depending on reaching herd immunity. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

We are not going to achieve any levels of population immunity or herd immunity in 2021” -WHO’s chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan. (Science Alert)

Interview Emily Gallagher started her term as a state assembly member representing the state’s 50th district. (Julia Kott for Greenpointers)

“Why is New York spending so much money on giant waiting room/malls that all have nowhere to sit? And what does this say about how we’ve chosen to treat our public spaces and transit infrastructure? Must we make every public space so inhospitable to the people using it or can we find a better way?”
-Benjamin Kabak, Some thoughts on Moynihan Train Hall and designing public spaces with nowhere to sit, for Second Ave Sagas

The High Line will be extended to connect to the new Moynihan Train Hall. The $60 million project does not have an expected completion date yet. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

If you’ve got the bitcoin, you could be the new owner of Hellcat Annie’s Tap Room and Scruffy Duffy’s on Tenth Avenue. Two bars for 25 bitcoins, which works out to be about $862k. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Every business is Schrödinger’s cat during the pandemic. Despite rumors to the contrary, Economy Candy is still alive. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Sorry Upper West Side crafters, Michael’s on Columbus Ave is closing. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

The governor’s State of the State address (watch the 43-minute speech here) is an outline to “win” the Covid war, but not without a lot of help from Washington. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio will likely be remembered for two terms of broken promises. In July he promised to accelerate his “affordable” high-speed internet plan for public housing and low-income areas hit hard by the pandemic. IT’s been six months and the city has not made a single deal on the initiative the mayor has been talking about since 2013. (Reuven Blau for The City)

The best Thai restaurants in NYC, if you’re ready. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, and Arden Shore for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 30, 2020 – The “There’s A Great Hot Dog Stand Nearby” Sunday Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: A four-way city schools standoff, what to expect as museums open across the city, where to eat after 11pm, trash in parks, and more

Today – Low: 65˚ High: 80˚
Clear throughout the day.

Wondering what the hell was going on with those fireworks over the Hudson on Thursday night right around 11 pm ? Those were a part of MTV’s Video Music Awards. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

With the first of the month right around the corner, here’s what you should know about rent concessions. (Jordi Lippe-McGraw for StreetEasy)

Headlines about New York having the lowest infection rates in six months area great, but they are no reason to relax about following the guidelines. These headlines are literally the reason to stay strict. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The mayor’s plan to reopen the schools is a gamble, and he’s gambling with the health of students, teachers, and staff. With the numbers being as low as they are at the moment, it may look safe, but it’s still a gamble that doesn’t yet have the complete support of the teachers’ union. As we get closer and closer to September 10, we face a showdown between the United Federation of Teachers, who may still call for a strike over safety concerns, the mayor’s office, the City Council, which plans to call for a delay, and Governor Cuomo, who could still step in and overrule the mayor’s decision. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

When colleges in the state have 100 cases in two weeks or the total cases equal 5% of the on-campus population, the entire school will go into remote learning for two weeks. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Museum of Natural History plans on opening next month, but those plans could be derailed by a dispute with its union over privacy concerns. The museum wants its employees to use an app to track Covid-19 symptoms using an app whose data is not protected by HIPPA. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

MoMA PS1 will reopen on September 17. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

A guide to MoMA and the Met. (NY Times)

Photos: A first look at the Met’s new Roof Garden Commission Lattice Detour by Héctor Zamora. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

What to expect when heading back to a museum for the first time since March. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Yeah, the Met is opening, but more importantly, the Hot Dog King is back. These kinds of stories seem inconsequential, people who truly love New York have little bits of knowledge that have been obliterated by the pandemic. These kinds of stories are the ones that defy the narrative that the city is, ahem, “dead.” (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

“Have you not walked the streets? Have you not seen the people here? Born here, bred here, living and breathing here. They are scrappy, scared, hungry, and tired, but more importantly, they’re pissed. If anything the rebel cry of thousands, millions, fighting to live is what should terrify anyone that dare declare us dead.”
– Ariama C. Long, Who The Fuck Are You To Tell Me My City’s Dead for Kings County Politics

The argument that laughs in the face of the modern “Why I left New York” essay. (Talmon Joseph Smith for The Atlantic)

The House of Yes’ liquor license was suspended. The center of the suspension seems to be centered around the House of Yes not offering food directly, but relying on a “sister” restaurant and seemingly pleading ignorance of how the rules worked in addition to playing loud music. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Check out the designs for the Brooklyn park dedicated to LGBTQ advocate Marsha P. Johnson. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

At the RNC, President Trump made some assertions about crime in New York City. Here are the facts. (Alan Feuer for NY Times)

Speaking of the RNC, multiple New Yorkers who are NYCHA residents were featured in a video during the convention without their knowledge. They have come forward to let everyone know they are not Trump supporters and were tricked into appearing the in the video. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

MSG will be used as a polling site in November’s election thanks to the deal the NBA players’ union made with the league’s owners. There hasn’t been any word about the Barclays Center yet. (Faraz Toor for NY1)

In a move to attempt to stave off clerical problems in a similar fashion to the ones that were ever-present in the June primaries, Governor Cuomo signed and tweaked legislation that will notify voters of issues with their ballots that can be fixed within seven days of being notified. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD officer Henry Vidal was arrested in March for beating his partner inside her Harlem apartment. He was suspended without pay and ordered to stay away from the woman. On Friday he violated that order and reportedly pulled a gun on her and threatened to kill her inside her sister’s home. He was arrested and is still suspended without pay. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city’s new chokehold ban is a month old and already the City Council is bowing to the NYPD and is considering amending it. The NYPD is banned from sitting, kneeling, or standing on someone’s chest or back that compresses the diaphragm. The NYPD wants to add the word “recklessly” to the wording, which is a loophole big enough to drive an NYPD SUV straight through. (NY1)

This is the NYPD, which has no problem recklessly parking and blocking bus stops. (Jose Martinez for The City)

This is the same NYPD that has been occupying streets adjacent to precincts since June and has recently gone as far as setting up “checkpoints” on their needlessly occupied streets. (Nick Garber for Patch)

It’s hard to imagine our idiot mayor enforcing anything when his motorcade blocked a waterfront bike lane so he could make an announcement about ferries. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Trash complaints are up 120% in the city’s parks. The city’s solution is an advertising campaign urging people to throw out their trash. While I can appreciate the effort, actually maintaining the parks may go further than asking people politely, but with an $84 million budget cut, ads in LinkNYC kiosks might be as good as we can get. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

If you want to see President Trump wearing a mask (a facemask, not a leather gimp mask you sickos), the only place you’ll be able to see it is in Madame Tussauds in Times Square. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The Punjabi Deli on Houston is open for the first time in four months. The food is legendary, especially for vegans and vegetarians. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The city added six more streets for outdoor dining in Boerum Hill, Garment District, Flatiron, Harlem, and Astoria. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

‘Tis the season for billionaires to form shady coalitions and astroturfed “advocacy” to fight the idea that the rich should be taxed, if not eaten whole. It almost worked, but their partners are all withdrawing after being outed as possibly bankrolled by a billionaire Republican. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Thinking about starting a food business? How about shelling out for this space shuttle food truck? It was formerly a DC-3 airliner and has a full-service, commercial kitchen, restroom, and cockpit. You’ll have to sell a lot of astronaut ice cream to afford the $149,000 price point. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Congrats to Mayor de Blasio, who is overseeing a city that is giving thousands of parking tickets to its frontline nurses, despite explicitly giving them parking placards to avoid getting tickets. (Kathleen Culliton for NY1)

At the beginning of the year, it seemed like we had three front-runners for 2021’s mayoral race with Comptroller Scott Stringer, City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. Three men and two of them are white. The Times asks do New York City voters want another white mayor? (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

Where to eat outside after 11pm. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Michael for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for August 24, 2020 – The “One Thing the Pandemic Can’t Stop” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The eviction moratorium is extended, teachers fight back against starting school, the city sued over indoor dining, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

Do not wait. Click here to apply for your absentee ballot today. Everyone in the city can apply.

The Times lays out why an antibody test and its results are useless if you want to know if you’ve ever had Covid-19 or if you can’t get it again. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

Here comes the fall foliage, the greatest show in New York City this fall. Also, it’s the only show in New York City this fall. Here are some spots to check out the fall foliage. (Katrina Makayan for New York Family)

Of all the things that the Covid-19 pandemic has taken away from New York, but the $2 billion AirTrain to LGA isn’t one of those things, as the FAA’s draft Environmental Impact Study concludes it “best meets the stated Purpose and Need.” (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

Even Governor Cuomo wouldn’t give an answer when asked if he has school-age kids if he would send them back to NYC schools. Classes start on September 10. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Last week teachers rallied at Grand Army Plaza against reopening the city’s schools, citing unsafe conditions, a lack of a comprehensive testing program, and decades of neglect of the buildings themselves. (Emily Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

Can the city force teachers back into classrooms if teachers feel the classrooms are unsafe? The teacher’s union has begun gauging support for a strike over school reopening plans. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The subways will continue to stay shut down overnight, but the MTA is ending its program that gave free cab rides to stranded late-night essential workers. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Steiner Studios announced plans to build a 500,000-square-foot production facility on the waterfront in Sunset Park (less than a mile south of Industry City). This is a part of the city’s “Made in NY Campus,” which the mayor announced in his last “State of the City” speech, which is supposed to offer “more attractive rents than private property owners.” The city is contributing $15 million to construction costs. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

The ACLU has released data on complaints against over 81,000 current or former NYPD officers after the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals lifted the stay which blocked them from releasing the information. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database. (New York Civil Liberties Union)

It’s been four months since Francisco Garcia, an officer with a history of misconduct complaints and lawsuits and was caught on video beating a bystander and kneeling on his head while “enforcing” social distancing on the Lower East Side. It was one of the early indications that the NYPD would treat social distance enforcement like Stop And Frisk. According to the NYPD, the disciplinary process is “ongoing.” (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A look at Crocheron Park in Bayside. At a time when the city’s parks have never been more valuable, Crocheron Park has never looked worse. (Queens Crap)

The Brooklyn Museum will reopen to the public on September 12 and the Brooklyn Aquarium will be reopening on August 27. Like everything else in life in 2020, there will be new restrictions. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

All New York evictions are suspended until October 1 thanks to a ruling from the Office of Court Administration. Advocates are calling for an indefinite moratorium and landlords’ attorneys want to start evicting people yesterday. (Isaac Scher for Bushwick Daily)

As more and more types of businesses reopen, Coney Island is left behind. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

It’s hard not to make the NYU-Fyre Fest comparison with students sharing what the “meals” the school has served them. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

A lawsuit against New York’s statewide plastic bag ban was struck down by the state Supreme Court. The Bodega Association and plastic bag manufacturers brought the lawsuit. Nice to see this finally come to an end (for now). (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Following the city’s July 4th celebration, the de Blasio administration is working with Macy’s to ruin the Thanksgiving day Parade in similar fashion. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

The city has no plans to reinstate indoor dining and 100 restauranteurs announced plans to sue the city to allow indoor dining in a reduced capacity. Outdoor dining is set to expire for the year on October 31. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Following Governor Cuomo’s “alcohol must be ordered with a substantial amount of food” is having an effect, causing the closure of the cocktail bar Mister Paradise in the East Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The State Liquor Authority has banned any advertised or ticketed music, karaoke, or other forms of live entertainment at bars and restaurants. This one is personal for me. I have been hosting socially distanced trivia since the start of July in an outdoor venue where every rule the state has implemented was strictly followed. It was free to attend, but we advertised it regularly. Is trivia entertainment? Depends on who you ask, but as of now, we have to stop. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Old Farmer’s Almanac has spoken about this coming winter. “Snowfall will be greater than normal in the Northeast.” Go to hell, Old Farmer’s Almanac. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The New York Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit challenging the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project, a multi-year effort to overhaul a stretch of the Lower East Side’s shore to protect the area from future flooding and storms. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

There will be a TONY award ceremony for the abbreviated 2019-2020 season. The show will take place this fall and it will be, of course, virtual. Broadway is currently closed through January 3, 2021, at the earliest. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Streetsblog asks a solid question: Why the hell are the double-decker tour buses still operating around the city? (Adam Light for Streetsblog)

11 inexpensive Times Square restaurants for takeout and outdoor dining. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)