The Briefly for June 2, 2020 – The “Repeal Civil Rights Law Section 50-a” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: An NYPD union is suspended from Twitter, the arguments for defunding the NYPD, Revel and Citi Bike shut down during curfew, cute trash pandas, and more

Today – Low: 63˚ High: 71˚
Rain overnight.

Over the weekend, an NYPD officer pulled his gun out and pointed it at a crowd of protestors and it was caught on video. The NYPD is conducting an internal review, but the mayor took no time to call for this cop’s gun and badge. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

The NYPD’s union has spent millions of dollars protecting Civil Rights Law section 50-a, which prohibits the city from releasing findings of misbehavior of NYPD cops, and they are getting ready to dig into their pockets to fight reform, which has the support of the governor and mayor. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

On the state senate’s website, you can sign your support for the repeal of 50-a.

The cries to defund the NYPD are getting louder and they’re starting to come from elected officials. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

It took public shaming from AOC to Corey Johnson to literally everyone who saw the footage, but the mayor is ready to admit that the NYPD driving an SUV into a crowd of people is “dangerous and unacceptable” and doesn’t think he “expressed it as well as I should have.” (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

When Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux designed Union Square, they specifically designed a portion of the park for public gatherings and protests. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

“We have to call out everyone who says anything that is racist, on any level. Don’t be scared of telling Cuomo that he’s speaking racist language. If you sit in these city agency and Corporate meetings as a black person but afraid to call racism out then YOU are part of the problem. Stop being scared. Be strong for your children and grandchildren.”
– Vernon Jones / CEO of JIG Media for East New York News, The NYPD Slave Catching Tactics Give Reason to Create a New Way To Hold Police Accountable for Their Violations Against Black New Yorkers

At 11:00 last night, the first night of NYC’s curfew, I found myself on my way home from the people gathering outside Brooklyn’s 77th precinct, realizing I could have gotten there quicker had I jumped on a Revel or Citi Bike but kept walking anyway. I was wrong because both services shut down at 11 pm with the curfew. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

“It’s a mafia mentality. It’s a ‘If you speak out against us, you’re not with us’ kind of deal. If the writing on the wall is ‘let’s go arrest people’ and the people happen to be black, [then you have to do it or] you’re not with us. It’s a shit system.” An interview with a Brooklyn cop. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

Two Brooklynites and one upstate New Yorker were arraigned in federal court for allegedly throwing Molotov cocktails at police cars in two separate incidents during protests against police brutality on May 30. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

Manhattan state Senator Brad Hoylman called upon the city’s five district attorneys Monday not to prosecute people arrested for disorderly conduct or unlawful assembly during protests, charging that “protesting injustice is not a crime.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

“We can no longer tolerate the police officers who do not uphold the rule of law but instead engage in murder, assault and racial profiling, and then protect each other.”
– Francis Greenburger and Cheryl Roberts for amNew York Metro, Is there any justice left in America?

How did you learn about the arrest of the mayor’s daughter? The same way the mayor did, he read about it in the news. How did the information about the mayor’s daughter get to the news? The union that represents the NYPD’s sergeants tweeted out personal information about Chiara de Blasio. They were temporarily suspended from Twitter for the privacy breach. (Dana Rubenstein and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

“Behind the crowd, a four-year-old black boy tried to teach his baby brother how to clap hands. He held his hands and moved them towards as the crowd loudly clapped and shouted: “I can’t breathe.” ” (Ali Tufan Koc for Bedford + Bowery)

“I am tired. Tired of how routine violence against African Americans at the hands of white people has been and continues to be. Angry as a journalist that this has happened so often that we all know the angles that must be covered, the questions to be asked, the stories to be written. Angrier still that as an African American journalist, I must explain, again and again, how dehumanizing this all is.”
– Amanda Barrett for Brooklyn Eagle, American Diary: To be Black and a journalist at this moment

Five things to know if you’re going out to protest in New York City. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Bronx Councilmember Ritchie Torres are demanding an independent investigation into the NYPD’s actions during a weekend of protests, challenging Mayor de Blasio’s plan to direct the Corporation Counsel and Department of Investigations to investigate. They want an investigation that is not done by any office controlled by the mayor. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

10 riots in the city’s history. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This will be the only mention of damage caused in Soho during protests. Don’t mix the message of protestors with the damage of looters. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery) note: I’m not saying that Bedford + Bowery is doing this, they do a good job of pointing out that the damage was caused by people separate from the George Floyd protests.

Adorable: To close out today, here are some photos of a trash panda and her babies of Carroll Park, who have taken up residence ever since the park has been closed to people. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking, photos by Gary Dolan)

The Briefly for August 23, 2019 – The “Can No Longer Get Away With Murder” Edition

NYC’s students are still less than 50% proficient in English and math, 15 restaurants to BYOB, Di Fara reopens, the Museum of Ice Cream find a home, and more in today’s NYC news digest

This weekend’s scheduled subway disruptions look minimal on the surface, but the 1, 2, 3 and 5 trains are still taking a big hit. (Subway Weekender)

The Times is starting to take guesses as to when the mayor finally ends his joke of a presidential bid. (NY Times)

The Museum of Ice Cream is getting a permanent home in Soho on Broadway this fall. Get your Instagram accounts ready. (Curbed)

The NYC Police Benevolent Association’s response to the Daniel Pantaleo firing, who caused the death of Eric Garner with an illegal chokehold, is to tour the city’s precincts to say that “no one has our backs,” circulating photos of James O’Neill saying he’s “wanted for killing the NYPD,” and posting in a message board for police officers called the “Law Enforcement Rant” calling Eric Garner’s family “savages” and “ghetto dwellers.” It’s like they no longer think they can get away with murder at their jobs. (Gothamist)

There used to be a bowling alley in the basement, the secret top floor bar, and more secrets of the Jane Hotel. (Untapped Cities)

Keens in Midtown is wallpapered with history, with newspaper clippings, photos, playbills, etc on display all over the steakhouse. Until recently, that history included about 10 pieces that featured racist stereotypes. Nothing will put a hamper on your night like finding out your “thumbs up” photo with your steak also featured a large “rival darkies” minstrel show ad in the background. (Eater)

A venomous snake went missing two weeks ago in the Bronx Zoo’s “Jungle World” exhibit. It’s still missing. (Bronx Times)

A man was crushed to death by an elevator in Kips Bay in an elevator that was ordered to be shut down in May by the Department of Buildings. (NY Times)

Billionaire’s Row residents tried to take the mayor up on his offer to do “anything” to rescue the Di Fara pizzeria by offering to pay Di Fara’s tax bill if the mayor would stop a homeless shelter from opening in their neighborhood. (Patch)

No need, because Di Fara reopened on Thursday afternoon. (Grub Street)

NYC student achievement is rising, but still, only 46% of the city’s third through eighth-graders passed the state’s math exam and only 47% passed the English exam. Both numbers are up from last year, but both fall short of the city’s 50% goal. (NY Times)

The 7 train continues to drop debris from its elevated tracks in Queens. This time it was a piece of metal the size of a brick that luckily avoided hitting anyone. The MTA has installed netting as part of a pilot program in some areas of the 7 train, but clearly not in enough locations. (Gothamist)

The new Kosciuszko Bridge is scheduled to open next month, four years ahead of schedule. (Sunnyside Post)

The Department of Homeless Services announced a joint operation between DHS and NYPD in an effort to offer services and not punishment to the city’s homeless on the subways. (Curbed)

Next month the MLB FoodFest brings foods from every Major League Baseball stadium to Midtown. You won’t have to go to Texas to get the dilly-dog: a hot dog stuffed inside a pickle and fried like a corn dog. (amNY)

The top 15 restaurants where you can BYOB. (Eater)