The Briefly for January 26-28, 2020 – The “Getting Away with Attempted Murder” Tuesday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: NYC gets more vaccines (but not enough), how to defund the police, new hot dog restaurants, a primer on the city’s biryanis, and more

Today – Low: 34˚ High: 37˚
Rain starting in the afternoon.

What do the new Covid-19 variants mean for daily life from an epidemiologist from Columbia University. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The city will receive more Covid-19 vaccine doses this week, but only 108,000 doses. The vaccination mega sites at Citi Field, Yankee Stadium, and Empire Outlets will remain closed. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

What you need to know about the Public Advocate race for 2021. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Daniel Presti, the co-owner of Macs Public House that hit a sheriff’s deputy with his car, avoided felony charges with a grand jury charging him with two misdemeanors instead. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

It’s like real life imitating ranked-choice voting. State Senator Gustavo Rivera gave Scott Stringer his endorsement as a first pick for mayor and endorsing Dianne Morales as a second choice. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Times lays out how much time each mayoral candidate spent outside of NYC, Andrew Yang wants to build a casino on Governor’s Island, NYPD Commissioner Shea does not have most candidates’ support, and highlights from the mayor’s race. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons, Jeffery C. Mays, Dana Rubinstein and Katie Glueck for NY Times)

We are so used to treating the police and policing as the solutions that they most clearly are not. Even conversations with progressives and leftists, it’s hard to shake the language and framework around incarceration. But I know we can do it if we are intentional and clear about how we want to do this work.
– Brandon West, City Council candidate, We Can Defund The Police—Here’s How for The Indypendent

Pickle Alley is, despite your dirty jokes, is the historic home of NYC’s pickle scene in the Lower East Side. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

North Brooklyn’s guerrilla-style, free store, pop-ups. Where to find them, who’s running them, and how to help them. (Erin Conlon for Greenpointers)

Marcia Sells has been hired as the first chief diversity officer of the Metropolitan Opera to rethink equity and inclusion at the largest performing arts institution in the country. (Joshua Barone for NY Times)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art launched The Met Unframed, an interactive virtual art exhibit featuring augmented reality versions of some of the museum’s most iconic masterpieces. (Anna Ben Yehuda for Time Out)

A primer to New York City’s biryanis. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Real Estate Lust: A cozy $1.75 million Brooklyn Heights duplex with three fireplaces, exposed brick and ceiling beams, a private terrace, and a quick walk to Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Council has led the way calling for re-authorizing the $25 million in emergency food pantry funding distributed last May. Mayor de Blasio must act again. Millions of New Yorkers still need this support.
-City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, Met Council CEO David Greenfield and United Way of New York City President & CEO Sheena Wright, Mayor de Blasio Must Reauthorize Emergency Funding for Hungry New Yorkers for amNewYork Metro

The high cost of closing a restaurant. (Kevin Rouse for Gothamist)

Photos: The original 1910 abandoned Penn Station power plant, the largest remnant form the original station. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Senator Chuck Schumer is feeling confident about the future of the Hudson River tunnel Gateway Project and congestion pricing in Manhattan under the Biden administration. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

The NYC Sheriff’s Office broke up a 75-person party inside a cramped basement in Woodside, Queens late Saturday night. Sixty-three partygoers face a rare $1,000 fine each for health code violations at the location. The party’s organizer was hit with second-degree obstruction, disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, and organizing a nonessential mass gathering charges on top of pending alcohol beverage charges that are pending. Idiot. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Average rents in Long Island City are down, from $4,397 for a two-bedroom apartment to $3,660. Even with the declines, Long Island City is the most expensive neighborhood in Queens. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

There are two new hot dog restaurants in Manhattan amid a decade-long decline in hot dog popularity. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Architecture: “Inspired by biology,” “snake-like,” and a “ghostly stance.” Take a look at a proposed idea for the weirdest-shaped building in New York City. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

I’ll never not celebrate the opening of a new pizza place. Austin Street Pizza is now open in Forest Hills. (Drake for Edge of the City)

New York will ask the federal government to waive state tests for a second consecutive year due to the coronavirus pandemic. (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

The MTA unveiled a memorial dedicated to the 136 employees who have died from the coronavirus since March. It can be seen on three-panel digital screens across 107 subway stations. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

There are millions of on-street parking spaces for cars in the city. Compare that to only 56,000 spots for bicycles for the 1.6 million riders, embarrassingly low compared to other cities. (Winnie Hu for NY Times)

The hottest heat lamps in NYC and where to find them. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Francesca for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for Election Day, 2020 – The “Let’s All Get Through Today Together” Election Day Edition

Today’s NYC news digest: An Election Day overview, food and drink specials, a new public art installation at Atlantic Terminal, Election Day food, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 52˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

Vote Biden. Vote Biden on the Working Families Party.

First thing today, the good news. Over 1.1 million New Yorkers already voted in this year’s election, accounting for about half of the total early votes in the state. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Track your absentee ballot today. (NYC Absentee)

If your ballot hasn’t been accepted yet and you’re starting to feel nervous, you should go vote today. It’s legal and your absentee ballot will be removed and not counted. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

If you encounter an issue voting, fill out a complaint with Attorney General Letitia James’ office. (New York State Attorney General)

NY1’s election Q&A. (Faraz Toor for NY1)

What to eat on Election Day in NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

A round-up of deals and discounts for poll workers and voters. Pizza to the Polls is out in full force, discounts at Baked by Melissa, Chop, Krispy Kreme, CAVA, and more. (6sqft)

If you’re voting today, be ready to see an elevated NYPD presence at polling locations. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

If the NYPD’s presence doesn’t make you feel unsettled, high-end stores along Fifth Ave and in Times Square are being boarded up ahead of Election Day. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Dozens of NYPD officers in riot gear and full body armor violently arrested 11 demonstrators on Sunday afternoon in Madison Square Park. It was a familiar NYPD story where seemingly out of nowhere the police charged the protestors in what seemed like a planned attack. (Sydney Pereira and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

The arrests led to this very odd tweet from the NYPD, who made the claim that unless a journalist is credentialed by the NYPD, they are not journalists. (@NYPDNews)

Photos: Meanwhile, Trump supporters drove around the city with an NYPD escort and eventually blocking the upstate Mario Cuomo Bridge and the Garden State Parkway in New Jersey. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Emily Gallagher is running unopposed for State Assembly District 50 after her defeat of 48-year incumbent Joe Lentol. Along with ending Lentol’s run in the Assembly, she’s also ending the “member items,” taxpayer-funded allotments for individual lawmakers for projects in their districts, for Williamsburg. (Josefa Velasquez for The City)

More food and drink specials across the city for Election Day. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Need a break from Election Day? Check out Stars in the House, a 10-hour marathon of conversations, rare videos, and live performances featuring Broadway and television stars, running from 9 am to 7 pm. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

The ultimate guide to Queens, from State Senator Jessica Ramos. (Deanna Ting for RESY)

If you go through Atlantic Ave subway station through December, you’ll find the “I Still Believe in Our City” Public Art Campaign by Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya, a response to an uptick in reports of anti-Asian discrimination, harassment, and bias related to Covid-19. There are 45 pieces in the series. (Lauren Messman for NY Times)

35 additional public act installations to see across the city in November. (Justin Wu for Untapped New York)

Photos: The best Halloween costumes on the subway. (Ben Yakas and Sai Mokhtari for Gothamist)

John Mulaney hosted SNL last weekend, which is always worth watching. This week’s episode yielded another fantastic NYC-focused musical sketch. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Video: Airport Sushi, a previous Mulaney gem. (SNL on YouTube)

Listen, we all know the current Penn Station sucks, but there are still remnants of the original dotted around the city, including the original stone eagles, which can be found in King’s Point. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Apartment Porn: A $4.65 Park Slope carriage house, with a shared garage across two three-bedroom duplexes, a garden, two terraces, and a roof deck. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at the Queens Museum’s three new, post-lockdown exhibitions. (Holland Cotter for NY Times)

Photos: A look at The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition The Costume Institute’s About Time: Fashion and Duration. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The best dishes the editors of Eater ate this week. (Eater)

Nine ways outdoor dining will change New York. (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Meet Paris McKenzie, the youngest beauty supply store owner in Brooklyn. (Yannise Jean for The Brooklyn Reader)

The Briefly for February 28, 2020 – The “I Got About Five Friends Left” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The forever feuds between governors and mayors, who gave money to what candidate in your zip code, the best cocktails under $10, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 26˚ High: 43˚

What was the point of making the NYPD to wear body cameras if the Civilian Complaint Review Board, the very people who are supposed to have oversight of the NYPD, have to request the footage form the NYPD? (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are a lot of things that contributed to the Lower East Side gaining near-mythical status. Each story isn’t enough to turn a set of streets into a phenomenon on its own, but when combined into one tightly-packed neighborhood, it almost seems impossible that it was ever real at all two decades later. One of those places was Rainbow Shoe Repair, a cobbler’s shop that became the place to be photographed. Now some of those photographs have become an exhibition that will be touring the Lower East Side, including some displayed outside the Abrons Arts Center. (Untapped New York with photos by Daniel Terna)

Why is it that Chipotle is always front and center when it comes to labor law violations by fast food companies? (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Are New York governors and city mayors destined to feud forever? Governor Pataki, in his new books, says Mayor Giuliani asked him to cancel the 2001 mayoral elections so he would be able to stay in office longer after the 9/11 attacks. Giuliani denied the claim, but forgot to hangup the phone and said “I got about five friends left.” I’d feel bad for him if he wasn’t such a ghoul. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

If you want one last taste of receiving plastic bags when shopping in NY, make a point to do your shopping on Saturday. Sunday starts the plastic bag ban. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Are you one of the 9% of New Yorkers that would give up sex if you never had to deal with parking a car in the city? (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

This is a true Trump to City: Drop Dead moment. The Trump administration stopped a feasibility study, looking at how New York and New Jersey could be protected from future weather events like Superstorm Sandy. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

A driver killed a seven-year-old boy in East New York, making it the second child killed by the driver of a vehicle in three days in the neighborhood. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Chinatown building that housed the Museum of Chinese in America archives and was destroyed by a five-alarm fire in January will be demolished and rebuilt. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

In 2018 the city enacted a program where you could get paid 25% of a fine to report idling cars and trucks, which would be a payout ranging from a $75 to $500. There was the billboard campaign featuring cartoon birds reminding everyone to stop idling their cars. Clearly that didn’t work, because the city is back with a new campaign featuring Billy Idol entitles “Billy Never Idles.” Despite the campaign, filing a complaint through the city’s 311 app is not possible. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The “I Wanna Quit the Gym” bill passed the state senate and i headed to the assembly. Pretty soon you’ll be able to cancel that NYSC membership that accidentally renewed because you forgot about it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

No one has tested positive for coronavirus in the city or state, but that hasn’t stopped the growing anxiety of knowing it’ll be on our doorstep sooner or later. The city and state say they are prepared with plans for hospitals, schools, mass transit, businesses and mass gatherings along with supplies at the ready and $40 million in funding to fight the virus. (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The NYPL is about to debut their first-ever permanent exhibition entitled “Treasures,” with items from the archives like a copy of the Declaration of Independence in Thomas Jefferson’s handwriting, original Mozart and Beethoven sheet music, Sumerian tables, and more. “Treasures” will open in November. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Department of Transportation rejected an idea to move the Queens Blvd bike lane to the road’s median, but that didn’t stopp the mayor from publicly asking “what’s the harm in considering this idea that the DOT already said was a bad idea?” (Garsh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

This weekend starts the first #Never Bloomberg march at his townhouse on the Upper East Side, protesting his police surveillance of Muslims, stop and frisk, the homelessness spike under his watch, and the list goes on and on. The march is being lead by multiple groups, including the Working Families Party, who never endorsed Bloomberg for mayor in 2001, 2005, or 2009. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Congrats, Brooklyn. You’ve officially made it, being named TripAdvisor’s #5 trending destination in the United States. (Irina Groushevaia for BKLYNER)

The Brooklyn Public Library and the Brooklyn Historical Society have announced a new plan to merge. Jennifer Schuessler for NY Times)

As if having to go to New Jersey wasn’t enough of a punishment, a broken signal added insult to insult on Thursday’s evening rush hour commute, causing hour-long delays that began at 5:30. Sounds lovely. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Mayor Bloomberg took credit for getting gay marriage passed in New York, Governor Cuomo remember a different version of that story. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Video: A slide show on New York in the 1910s. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A week-long staycation in NYC. (Pardon Me For Asking)

Here are all the ways you pay taxes when you buy a home in the city. (Localize.Labs)

Who does New York support for president, financially? (RentHop)

The best cocktails for $10 and under. (Julien Levy for Thrillist)