The Briefly for November 18, 2019 – The “Curiously Timed Stop & Frisk Change of Heart by Bloomberg” Edition

De Blasio opposes commercial rent control, the Lizzo of scones in Prospect Heights, Cuomo goes after the Proud Boys, a $350 axe, and more in today’s Daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway disruptions are taking large chunks of the 4, 6, 7, A, D, E, L, and Q lines out of service. (Subway Weekender)

Mayor Bloomberg is “sorry” for supporting stop-and-frisk and the trust he lost from supporting it still bothers him. He has had a very opportune change of heart that timed coincidentally alongside his future-failed presidential run. (HuffPost)

Mayor Bloomberg marketed stop-and-frisk as a way to reduce crime by deterring it before it happened. Instead it was a policy of indirect racial profiling of young black and Latino and was used in an unconstitutional manner. (NY Times)

It was not lost on anyone that a majority of the families first in line for a recent open house were white and wealthy. They were some of the 500 parents paying $200 for a newsletter that gives them the advantage when it comes to high school tours and open houses. (NY Times)

Meet Ashley James, the Guggenheim’s first full-time black curator. (NY Times)

Is anyone surprised to find Mayor de Blasio siding with the real estate industry when it comes to commercial rent control? (Gothamist)

A look at the violent history of Randy Santos, the man arrested for killing four homeless men in Chinatown, and claims he remembers nothing from the night he was found with a bloody metal bar in hand and recorded on video making the attacks. (NY Times)

A look at Decolonize This Place, the activist group behind the viral videos of the NYPD arresting churro ladies and teens in the subways. (NY Times)

Today starts an official effort by City Council staffers to unionize over pay disparities, long hours, and low wages. (Politico)

Congestion pricing goes into effect in January of 2021, which isn’t a lot of time for the MTA’s board to get moving on getting the details of the program together. (Streetsblog)

“Crawl back into your hole, Bigot Boys — there’s no place for hate in our state.” Governor Cuomo may not be the best with insulting nicknames, but it’s good to see him telling the neo-fascist group the Proud Boys to go to hell on behalf of all New Yorkers. (amNewYork)

Of the city’s $20 billion in contracts to private businesses, only 4.9% of them went to minority- or women-owned businesses, which seems like an insanely low number. (amNewYork)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health is relatively tame, but still unnerving. (Patch)

Three people were convicted of manslaughter in the 2015 East Village building explosion that killed two men and triggered by an illegally installed gas line. (amNewYork)

The head of the state’s Committee on Open Government, Bob Freeman, committed a series of inappropriate touching and sexual harassment according to a report from the state’s inspector general. He was fired in June. (Gothamist)

What the hell is anyone in New York City going to do with a $350 axe? No matter, now you can buy one in Williamsburg. (Bedford + Bowery)

Getting real-estate developers to create low-income housing was a fight, getting them to remove “poor doors” was a fight, and getting them to treat all their tenants equally is just as much a fight. (Gothamist)

15 great Caribbean restaurants around the city. (Eater)

An extension of LaGuardia Airport? A solar farm? Homes? Let the speculation on what replaces Rikers Island begin! (NY Times)

Brooklyn Bazaar is closing at the end of the month and is having a liquidation sale. (Brooklyn Vegan)

This review of MeMe’s Diner in Prospect Heights compares its pretzel scone to Lizzo, so take that as high praise. (Grub Street)

Maya Lin’s Eclipsed Time hung from the ceiling in Penn Station for 25 years and while I’ve lived in or near the the city for 100% of that time, I never once noticed it while making my way around the dreadful station. It’s been disassembled and stored off-site while renovations continue, perhaps one day to be noticed and appreciated. (Untapped New York)

Photos: The Penn Station renovations have uncovered some pieces of the original station, the Guastavino tiles and vaulted ceilings of a passageway that was sealed up in the 80s. (Gothamist)

Things are not going great in the contract talks between the MTA and transit union workers. No talks of a strike like in 2005 just yet, even if a strike is technically illegal. (amNewYork)

A guide to NYC’s casual Italian restaurants. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 13, 2019 – The “Staten Island Revisits Secession from New York City” Edition

The city’s first hair discrimination case is settled, Penn Station is about to get worse, a 22.5-foot arm appears in Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Queens has a new Boulevard of Death, and it’s Jewel Ave. (Streetsblog)

The first hair discrimination case in the city has been resolved. Sally Hershberger and partner Sharon Dorram lost a $70k lawsuit after former workers were told that their hairstyles didn’t fit a dress code, specifically that “afros and box-braid hairstyles did not reflect the upscale image of the neighborhood.” (The Root)

Staten Island wants to secede from NYC. (Gothamist)

Penn Station’s multi-year renovation means that the already depressing station will become even more dour when it loses about 17 businesses including Shake Shack, Magnolia Bakery, two Starbucks, a Pretty and Godiva. (Eater)

Can an opinion be wrong? In the case of the “Can We Talk About Womanspreading?” opinion piece that ran in the Daily News, the answer is yes. Claire Lampen read it, so you don’t have to. (Gothamist)

Last night’s sunset was spectacular. (@mikiodo)

What’s the point of adding 500 cops to the subways to police fare evasion? Rationally minded folks aren’t the only ones asking that question, the MTA’s board is also starting to ask that same question. (Gothamist)

More cops of better service? The number of crimes on the subway are down, no matter what fantasy Governor Cuomo wants to create to justify spending more than half a billion dollars on new subway cops. The governor if you ask 100 people on the subway if they want more cops on the subways, 75 would say yes, so amNewYork went down and started asking. (amNewYork)

Dr. Sun Yat-sen received a monument in Chinatown at Columbus Park, adding Dr Sun’s name to the park’s plaza as well. He was a pioneer in the reform of China in 1911 and the monument has “All Under Heaven Are Equal” inscribed on the pedestal. (amNewYork)

This week is the best week for forest bathing. What’s forest bathing? I don’t really know. It’s kind of like taking a walk in the trees but different? (Gothamist)

The East Side Costal Resiliency (ESCR) project is headed for a full City Council vote on Thursday, which will decide the future of the East River Park and how the Lower East Side is protected from storms and the rising sea. (Curbed)

There are 40 NYCHA developments without gas, some without gas since April. City Comptroller Scott Stringer argues that if gas is not supplied for an extended period of time that the NYCHA should be offering food reimbursement and monthly bill abatements to compensate. (amNewYork)

Is the one minute you can spend inside the “Infinity Mirrored Room” at David Zwirner in Chelsea worth the potentially very long wait? (NY Times)

Looking for restaurants serving Thanksgiving dinner this year? (Patch)

How to choose an apartment based on the school district. (StreetEasy)

With the help of Lin-Manuel Miranda and some Hamilton collaborators, the Drama Book Shop will be opening its new location on W 39th in the spring and operated by the company that operates Hamilton’s gift shop. (NY Times)

Third Ave in Sunset Park between 20th and 30th Streets underneath the Gowanus Expressway is becoming a hub for RV parking. (amNewYork)

A rezoning in Woodside was given the thumbs up by Community Board 2 that will bring 60 apartments to 52nd St near Queens Blvd with parking, a community facility, and commercial space. (Sunnyside Post)

Last weekend saw a spike in hate crimes reported in Brooklyn, most anti-Semitic in nature. (amNewYork)

The National Grid / Governor Cuomo war of words hasn’t ended. The governor once again raised the threat of revoking National Grid’s license to operate in the southern part of the state. (NY Times)

Someone broke into the conductor cab on a 1 train and bean screaming “I have a fucking gun!” into the train’s PA system. Chaos ensued, as you might expect, but no one was found with a gun and no injuries were reported. (Gothamist)

RIP Charlie Gordon. Astoria’s Sandwich King, who established Sal, Kris & Charlie’s Deli in Astoria. (LIC Post)

Unity is a 22.5-foot bronze sculpture of an arm pointing towards the sky in Downtown Brooklyn by Hank Willis Thomas. The piece is “in homage to, and celebration of, the unique and multifaceted character of the borough of Brooklyn. There is one finger raised, but it’s not the Brooklyn salute you might assume. It’s the index finger. (Untapped New York)

Hall & Oates is hitting the road and MSG is on their list for February 28. (Brooklyn Vegan)

Single-Story Project,” from Adam Friedberg on view at the Center for Architecture captures 100 one-story buildings in the East Village and Lower East Side. It seems almost impossible that with the city as dense as it is that there are that many one-story buildings remaining. (Curbed)

Take a look inside Norah Jones’ $8 million circa-1843 Cobble Hill home, which includes a master suite terrace and a hot tub and pool in the backyard. (Curbed)

Are your neighbors’ security cameras spying on you? (NY Times)

The hottest restaurants in Queens this month. (Eater)

The Briefly for October 17, 2019 – The “Did 14th St Cause the Apocalypse?” Edition

A Halloween guide for dog lovers, New York can get around presidential pardons, 100 community gardens may close, the best Harlem restaurants, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

If you want to see dogs in Halloween costumes, this is your guide. (Gothamist)

There are more two-bedroom apartments available in Brooklyn than Manhattan. (StreetEasy)

Whoever is setting the Lower East Side Park port-a-potties on fire, stop it. (Patch)

The data is in and the 14th St busway did not cause the apocalypse. There was barely any change to the traffic on the surrounding streets. The study was conducted by the same people that found that the new Kosciuszko Bridge actually made traffic worse than before it was replaced. (Streetsblog)

The NYPD’s Hyun Kim, 25, was charged Saturday with two counts of menacing after pointing his gun at waitresses at a bar in Queens. (Gothamist)

A look inside the new TWA Hotel. (Forgotten New York)

Finally, a reason to go to Times Square! Check out the They Live-inspired billboard from Mitch “The World’s Best Artist” O’Connell at 7th Ave and 48th St. (Boing Boing)

With Mother Cabrini in the news so much, take a tour down Cabrini Blvd in Washington Heights. It’s not arbitrarily named, it’s where she was interred for many years. (Forgotten New York)

If you’re into meta museum exhibits, the Museum of the City of New York’s Cultivating Culture is for you, focusing on 34 museums. Here are ten treasures from the exhibit. (Untapped Cities)

It didn’t take long, but the mystery of how a man ended up dead under a manhole seems to have been solved. On September 30, the man walked through multiple safety barriers and fell in and workers closed it up two hours later, not knowing he was down there. (Gothamist)

The former Caffe Cino location is now NYC’s newest landmark. It’s considered to be the home of Off Off Broadway. It’s currently home to the bar The Drunken Monkey. It was one of the six LGBTQ landmarks considered this week from the NYC Landmarks Commission. (Untapped Cities)

Apple and Facebook are in a new competition, but this time it’s over office space in the post office building on 8th Ave. (The Real Deal)

Lose a chainsaw? They’ve got it for you at the Penn Station lost and found. (Gothamist)

Opinion: In support of ranked-choice voting. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to eat and drink with your dog. (The Infatuation)

Video: See the newest residents of the Bronx Zoo, a trio of dholes, which are adorable and endangered wild dogs named Roan, Apollo, and Kito. (Viewing NYC)

Audio: A real look at gentrification, using Bed-Stuy’s recent neighborhood changes as a backdrop. (Brooklyn Based)

NYPD sergeant Linhong Li is the 10th member of the NYPD to commit suicide in 2019. He died of a gunshot to the head in his home in Fresh Meadows. Four members died by suicide in 2018. (Gothamist)

The land use committee approved the Rikers replacement jails, clearing the way for a full City Council vote today. (Politico)

Does NYC’s affordable housing program go far enough? (Curbed)

Representatives Eliot Engel, Jerry Nadler, Carolyn Maloney, and Yvette Clarke are all subject of AOC-style challenges for their seats in 2020. (Politico)

There are 100 community gardens that are in danger of closing because of the Parks Department’s new GreenThumb policies that it is mandating gardens sign in order to remain open. Volunteer organizations that run the refusing gardens say the rules are onerous and make it unviable to run the spaces. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A new law in New York will allow the state to bring charges against anyone who receives a presidential pardon for related crimes, citing the Supreme Court’s decision that double jeopardy does not apply to the states’ ability to bring charges that were also tried federally. (Politico)

Everything you need to know about the 2019 Village Halloween Parade. (curbed)

27 hit Harlem restaurants to try. (Eater)