The Briefly for February 11, 2020 – The “Brokers’ Fees Are Unbanned” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The subway mascot Cardvaark, the hottest restaurants in Queens, a sleepover at IKEA, the plastic bag ban, an Oreo slide, and more

Today – Low: 35˚ High: 48˚
Light rain in the morning and afternoon.

Congrats to the Barclays Center subway stop, which has the city’s worst privately owned subway elevator functioning for only 74.2% of 2019, out of service for a total of three months of the year. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Video: Go behind the scenes and back in time with this Metropolitan Museum of Art behind the scenes tour from 1928. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Remember when brokers’ fees were banned? Brokers’ fees have been unbanned, temporarily at least. The Real Estate Board of New York sued the state and the judge put a temporary restraining order on the rule. Snip snap. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hulu is taking over Rough Trade this weekend in an installation to promote the new Hulu version of High Fidelity. (Grant Lancaster for amNewyork Metro)

New York is the ninth most dangerous state for online dating, which takes into account internet crime rates and STI transmission rates. The safest site for online dating is Maine and the most dangerous is Alaska, which has the country’s highest man to woman ratio. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The best bars on the Upper West Side. (Hannah Rosenfield for I Love the Upper West Side)

Aldea, which arrives a Michelin star, is closing on February 22. Chef George Mendes cites plans to “take a break, recharge creatively, and refocus,” with no other reason given for the closure. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Pizza Rat won Gothamist’s poll for the new subway mascot, but let’s not forget the subway’s previous mascot, Cardvaark, who looks like everyone’s least coolest cousin wearing a homemade Halloween outfit, who was supposed to help us all transition from tokens to MetroCards. Fun fact, the same person who brought us Cardvaark also brought us Poetry in Motion. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Okay, so you’re moving from Manhattan to Brooklyn. Here are 19 answers to common questions. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

The NYPD is reporting 2019 saw the first rise in the number of Stop and Frisks since 2013, up 22% from 2018. An NYPD spokesperson, who must think that we’re all stupid, said that it’s “unlikely to be a true increase in stops but rather more accurate and complete reporting.” (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

With a history of racist and victim-blaming comments, does the Sergeants Benevolent Association’s Ed Mullins really speak for the actual NYPD? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Jeffery C. Mays for NY Times)

Take a deep breath in and release that tension in your body. The Yankees have reported for spring training, which means actual spring is coming. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Everything you need to know about NYC’s citywide ferry. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban, which kicks into gear in less than three weeks. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Manhattan’s community boards are older than the borough’s population, homeowners hold a disproportionately high number of seats and Hispanic people are underrepresented. Not a great representation. (Rachel Holliday Smith and Ann Choi for The City)

Oreo is building a giant inflatable slide in Herald Square that will open February 21st, so when you’re in Herald Square and your friends see the slide and ask what it is, you can look effortlessly cool by telling them “Oreo put it up.” (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

If you’ve always wanted to sleep in the Red Hook IKEA, here’s your chance. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

After an ICE agent shot Eric Diaz in the face, it’s time to ask if New York City really a sanctuary city? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

The Reckless Driver Accountability Act will require drivers who rack up five red light tickets or 15 school speed zone violations within a one year period to take a safe driving course or they’ll lose their car until they do. The bill is expected to pass City Council this week. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Cupid’s Undie Run, kind of like a street version of the No Pants Subway Ride but for charity, hit the streets last weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Video: ‘Commute’ by Scott Lazer is a beautiful film, shot on 16mm, even if it’s focused on Penn Station in rush hour. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

1 Dot = 1 Person. Explore how racially divided the city is using 2010 census data. (Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service)

Feds to the Hudson River rail tunnel: Drop Dead. (Ryan Hutchins for Politico)

Another day, another water main break. This time the water main on South Street near Pike Slio broke, flooding the area. (Bowery Boogie)

R40, La Rotisserie du Coin, La Mian Lounge join the hottest restaurants in Queens.

Featured photo sent in from reader @mfireup

The Briefly for February 6, 2020 – The “No More Paying Brokers Fees For Rentals” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo targets bridges for fare evasion, Prada settles a blackface lawsuit, where to eat in Industry City, High Maintenance, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 45˚
Rain throughout the day.

Everything you need to know about New York’s new plastic bag ban. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Is the “Molten Chocolate Body Scrub” weird or soothing with its cocoa scrub and chocolate mask? It’s both. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Is it better to rent or buy in NYC? There’s no one answer for anyone in the city. (Ameena Walker)

Landlord, not tenants, will now be forced to foot the bill for New York City’s notoriously high brokers fees, following new guidance issued by the NY Department of State. Maybe renting IS better! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Apartments without roommates with rent under $1,800 actually exist in the city, and here’s five of them. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

There have been no confirmed cases of coronavirus in the city but two more people have been quarantined due to a possible infection. This brings the total number of currently suspected cases to four, the first case was determined not to be coronavirus. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

A jackass in Chinatown attacked a mask-wearing woman in what is being investigated as a hate crime by the NYPD and the Hate Crime Task Force. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

You’ve got until February 13th if you want to put yourself into the lottery for the NYC Marathon. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

A year after Amazon cried its way back to Seattle, the Queens Chamber of Commerce has launched its “Relocate to Queens” campaign. (Bill Parry for QNS)

A 24-year-old man from Oklahoma allegedly stumbled into New York City, visited a guy he met on a dating app, killed him, and blew the slain man’s money all over the city, according court documents from the Manhattan district attorney’s office. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

Governor Cuomo’s Penn Station plan, by the numbers. (C.J. Hughes for The Real Deal)

Governor Cuomo is taking his fare evasion road show to the state’s bridges and tunnels, making evading a bridge toll to misdemeanor “theft of services.” Any Churro vendors on the Throggs Neck Bridge better watch out. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Welcome to the stretch of I-95 from the George Washington Bridge and stretching into the Cross Bronx Expressway, the fifth most dangerous spot in the nation for car crashes. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Signs for the Verrazzano Bridge have never been spelled correctly, thanks to an error on the contract for the bridge’s construction. That has been corrected. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

In an effort to fight postpartum depression, every first-time parent in New York City will soon be eligible to receive as many as six home visits from professionals for postnatal mental health care. (Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

New York City’s Department of Education consistently failed to follow requirements for annual lead-paint inspections in schools over the last five years, records show. No shit. (Christopher Werth for Gothamist)

An interview with the creators of High Maintenance on the fourth season of the show on keeping the show fresh, their collaboration with This American Life, Larry Owens, and more. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Restaurant workers are protesting the $15 minimum wage. Why? Because Governor Cuomo has twice raised the minimum wage to $15 for “everybody” and excluded them twice. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Meet the women behind Monumental Women, the group behind Central Park’s first statue of a woman. (Currie Engel for NY City Lens)

Two gangs from Brooklyn who are said to be responsible for at least 13 shootings, homicides and other crimes, were charged in a 122-count indictment after cops arrested 34 members and seized 16 guns in “Operation Boxed In.” The gangs were named, and this is seriously their names, the Wooo and the Choo. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Prada has agreed to a “groundbreaking” restorative justice agreement with the NYC Commission on Human Rights after using blackface imagery in their products and displays in their stores. They’ll create a scholarship and paid internship for racial minorities, make a commitment to recruit underrepresented employees, appoint a diversity officer, and everyone in the company will undergo racial equality training. This would be commendable if it wasn’t being forced on them as part of settling a lawsuit. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Manny Teixeira is the city’s longest-serving doorman, working in the same building since 1965., taking over for his father. (CBS New York)

Arthur Schwartz, the attorney for loud and angry wealthy white boomers and the man who tried to stop the 14th St busway, has turned his attention towards attempting to stop the East Side Coastal Resiliency project’s installation of a seawall in East River Park. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats to Tanay Warerkar, Erika Adams, and Luke Fortney for joining the team at Eater. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio’s approval rating is lower than President Trump’s. He’s a lame duck with two years to go. His presidential campaign was DOA. Can the mayor do anything to excite New Yorkers again? (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Mayor Bill de Blasio pushed back against a story from President Trump’s State of the Union that claims New York’s sanctuary city policy led to the murder of a Queens woman, accusing the president of trying to “exploit” the victim’s death. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The Strand is coming to the location of the now closed Book Culture on the Upper West Side. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

From March of 1965: Burying Malcolm X (Marlene Nadler for Village Voice)

The case of who killed Malcom X may be reopened 55 years after his death. (John Leland for NY Times)

Where to eat in Industry City. (Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for February 4, 2020 – The “NYPD’s Very Not Nice 69 Million Dollar Cost” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The race to contain the coronavirus, Cuomo may use eminent domain to renovate Penn Station, the best new restaurants in Brooklyn and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 56˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Is this the year that Albany passes marijuana legalization or… oh god I just can’t keep doing this. It’s been over a year with this story and every stupid pun has already been made. Up in smoke. Gone in a puff. High time to blahblahblah. Bottom line, can Albany get it done? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

While the CDC is doing the testing for coronavirus, there is a team of scientists in New York racing to help contain the outbreak. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Here’s what we know about the coronavirus in New York so far. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

New York City medical labs can’t run their own diagnostic tests for the novel coronavirus only the CDC’s offices in Atlanta can run the tests and results take 36-48 hours. Mayor de Blasio is asking to change that. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

The NYPD cost the city a very not nice nearly $69 million dollars in lawsuits in 2019. Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Reports of “subway surfing” increased in 2019, MTA figures show, though transit officials say the toll of those wild rides is likely even higher and deadlier than statistics indicate. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Things aren’t great for the real estate industry right now, but if you look at who’s running for mayor, things are looking worse. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Shaun Donovan, former Obama housing secretary and candidate for mayor, gets the NY Times treatment. (Aziz Paybarah for NY Times)

Are you one of the 1,128 New Yorkers that are in JR’s latest 53-foot mural in Domino Park? The mural is in conjunction with an exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, titled “JR: Chronicles.” Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Everything you need to know about steam heat. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

The history of how the New York Public Library got its start downtown. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

Can art survive Long Island City’s gentrification? (Malique Morris for Queens Chronicle)

Just when the city was about to ban plastic bags, it seems that a loophole may allow stores to hand out plastic bags as long as they’re thicc. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

13 notable NYC projects designed by black architects. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

Take a tour of Michelle Williams’s Brooklyn real estate empire. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

As a part of Governor Cuomo’s plans to redevelop Penn Station, he’ll need to find a way to acquire two full city blocks between 30th and 32nd and between Seventh and Eight Avenues. He could end up using eminent domain to get the land. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

A look at the Tenderloin neighborhood, before it was razed in 1904 to make way for the original Penn Station. (Ephemeral New York)

Speaking of Penn Station, Monday afternoon saw another commuting meltdown with only one tunnel for Amtrak and NJ Transit in operation crossing the Hudson. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 new public art installations not to miss in February. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The award for most radical stance goes to the “Students Speak Out: Cops Out of Our Schools and Subways” protest. The students in the protest are calling for the abolishment of the NYPD, a free subway system, and a fully funded and free CUNY system. (Amanda Salazar for Kings County Politics)

Williamsburg’s East River State Park will be renamed after the gay liberation movement leader Marsha P. Johnson, the first state park named in honor of an LGBTQ person. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Great Canoe in the American Museum of Natural History moved for the first time in 60 years, which was a split feat of engineering and spirituality. The canoe will be the centerpiece of a newly renovated Northwest Coast Hall in 2021. (Jennifer Vanasco for Gothamist)

Minerva Zanca, a principal in Queens, just cost the city over a million dollars for being a racist. She deliberately targeted black teachers and assistants with “racist insults and retaliation.” (Jay Connor for The Root)

PETA, who has always been on the right side of morals but displaying it in the most insufferable ways, put up a sign protest the Iditarod in Seward Park. Yes, protesting a dog sledding race in Alaska by installing a sign in front of the statue of Togo in Manhattan. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

We’ve been able to assume why, but we won’t know why Andy Byford resigned without seeing his resignation letter. Release the Byford letter, you cowards! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Baby Yoda mural at the top of the Second Ave F stop is no more, as “Gritty City Style” has taken over the wall. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD is working its hardest to create boogeymen to overturn recent bail reforms, including leaking cherry-picked stories and statistics to the press (mostly the Post and the Daily News, I’ve stopped including any stories from the Post and the Daily News’ paywall makes it difficult for me to link to regularly). Legal experts are urging caution whenever coming across an obviously sensationalized story and give the reforms a chance to work. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

80% of Bronx subway stations will have OMNY by the end of February. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The Parks Department is closing a portion of the Riverside Park bike trail for two months between 110th and 125th Streets for repairs and are offering no detour for bike riders. Bike riders, as you might imagine, are pissed. (Julianne Cuba)

An updated hit list of the best new restaurants in Brooklyn. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)