The Briefly for July 31, 2020 – The “NYC Loves Until It Destroys” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: School outbreak plans, restaurant openings and closings, looking at a billionaire’s tax, where to eat outdoor brunch, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 78˚
Rain in the morning.
This weekend – Low: 75˚ High: 85˚

Is it legal to sublet your apartment? Yes, but it’s complicated. (Localize.City)

Photos: If you’re looking for a unique experience when it comes to outdoor dining, check out the USS Baylander at the West Harlem Piers near 125th St, which has a dockside bar and restaurant. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Real Estate Porn: A $3.4 million Clinton Hill house with a haunted past. (Dana Shulz for 6sqft)

Just in time for school conversations to spin up again, here’s this headline from the Times: Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

Every student in the city is going to be issued a $420 food stamp card, regardless of their income. This creates a weird dilemma for high-income families. The money on the cards is real and if it isn’t used it’s wasted, and giving the card to someone else to use is fraud. Fortunately, there is a solution. (Matt Katz for Gothamist)

The city released plans for handling Covid-19 outbreaks in schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Is it possible for New Yorkers to “discover” a secluded and wonderful spot without destroying it? That’s the question across the entire city. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Without a federal stimulus, do NYC schools have enough money to open safely? (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Suraj Patel isn’t ready to concede the 12th Congressional district primary to incumbent Carolyn Mahoney, despite Mahony’s 3,700 vote lead, citing 12,000 ballots invalidated by the Board of Elections. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

He survived physical abuse, homelessness, and gang violence before coming to America as a refugee, where a homeless shelter trashed his wheelchairs while Saheed Adebayo Aare was put in a Manhattan isolation hotel. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Looking for somewhere new and weird to explore? Check out Dead Horse Inlet and Dead Horse Bay. (Kevin Wash for Forgotten New York)

The New York Liberty has a new CEO, just like the Brooklyn Nets do. Joe Tsai owns both teams and has been taking steps to put them both on equal footing with the installation of Keia Clark as CEO of the Liberty with the eventual goal of bringing the Liberty to the Barclays Center once possible. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Amanda Cohen, the chef and owner of Dirt Candy on if the no-tipping movement can survive the pandemic. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

The Department of Environmental Protection is looking to delay the Gowanus Canal cleanup from somewhere between 12 to 18 months due to declining revenues during the pandemic. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Remember when Governor Cuomo promised states that when New York was over the Covid-19 hump, he’d start sending help? Florida is the first recipient of his pledge, with the state sending gowns, gloves, masks, face shields, and hand santizer. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s legislature is introducing bills to try to prevent a doomsday scenario in the city where a rise in apartment vacancies could put an end to rent regulation. Under the current laws, when more than 5% of NYC apartments are vacant, rent regulation would come to an end. Building apartments and intentionally keeping them empty or working as hard as possible to evict tenants to drive up the vacancy rate sounds like a conspiracy but I’ll never put anything past landlords. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Governor Cuomo is against raising taxes on billionaires but seems to be totally cool with raising MTA fares and tolls on bridges, essentially taxing every non-billionaire instead. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The arguments for and against the constitutionality of a billionaires’ tax. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

June and July bring the summer’s heat, but it also brings nesting turtles onto the runways of JFK airport. Inside the annual struggle to protect the turtles in Jamaica Bay. (Lori Chung for NY1)

Even if Columbia University attempts to return to in-person classes in the call a strike by maintenance workers could halt their plans completely unless a new contract is agreed to by Friday night. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

With no help from the Yankees, the 161st St BID is trying to create a welcoming atmosphere around the stadium to help many of the area’s struggling businesses. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

McCarren Tennis Center’s weatherproof bubble over the public tennis courts will stay up all summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

Only around 14 percent of state prison inmates have been tested for Covid-19 since the crisis began. I’m no epidemiologist, but that seems like a low percentage. In comparison, there has been 2.596 million tests conducted in the city, which would cover about 30% of the population. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Tropical Storm Isaias may make landfall in NYC on Monday because things aren’t hard enough already. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What to expect at today’s “Take Your Knee Off Our Necks” in Midtown. (NY1)

Mayor Bill de Blasio is making the New York City court system into a scapegoat for the recent surge in gun violence according to Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks. (NY1)

Queens got a Black Lives Matter mural in front of the Family Court on Jamaica Avenue. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Get ready, because it’s ConEd blackout season. Southern Brooklyn was the first to be asked to turn down their electrical usage. (Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Where to get takeout in Greenwich Village and the West Village. Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The MTA is installing free mask dispensers inside city buses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Augustine in the Financial DIstrict. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Rosario’s Pizza on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

A list of the Williamsburg & Greenpoint places closed for good during COVID-19. (Bill Pearis for Greenpointers)

Farewell to Le Sia in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

Farewell to An Choi on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Union Pool’s patio and taco truck are back! (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Mott Street from Worth to Moscoe is closed off to cars and 10 restaurants all have outdoor dining with seating for over 100. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Where to eat outside on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The best outdoor brunch spots in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 10, 2020 – The “An Actual Piece of Good News for NYC” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The future of NYC restaurants, the repeal of 50a, each borough gets a Black Lives Matter street, support for disbanding the NYPD, restaurant guide, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 80˚
Rain overnight.

Mayor de Blasio announced that while the city may seem ready for a June 22 phase two reopening, we shouldn’t expect phase two to begin before July. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Sunday was a new low for the city in a good way. Only 1% of people tested for Covid-19 tested positive. Hospital admittances were at 52 on Sunday, far from the peak at 850. Transmission is still high, with hundreds of new cases every day. This good news isn’t a reason to stop being careful, it’s signs that what we are doing is working. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is supporting the idea of disbanding the NYPD, looking to follow Minneapolis’s lead. Police Benevolent Association President Pat Lynch is against the idea, but let’s be clear about this, he doesn’t get to have a seat at the table or a voice in this discussion. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The State Senate voted to repeal 50a. Governor Cuomo has vowed to sign the legislation. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

City courts are scheduled to reopen starting today since their closure in March, with precautions. Outside of emergencies, most matters will still be handled virtually. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Here are the rules for outdoor dining, which is allowed starting with phase two, slated for June 22. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

That hasn’t stopped restaurants from putting out tables and chairs for customers, which are inevitably used for dining. The most blatant is the White Horse Tavern, which announced it was open for business on Instagram and has been encouraging customers to use the tables and chairs for dining. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state has released its rules for indoor dining, as portions of the state are already looking at phase three. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

If tables aren’t placed more than six feet apart, restaurants may have to construct five-foot barriers, ie. cubicles, between the tables with a maximum of 10 people per table. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A deeper look at six critical points for restaurants before reopening. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

The Alibi Lounge, one of the city’s only Black-owned LGBTQ bars is in danger of closing. There is a GoFundMe, which is at $11,000 of its $50,000 goal. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

When will you be ready to go back to concerts, fly in an airplane, or attend a dinner party? The Times asked 511 epidemiologists and the short version is that it could be a year or more before things come close to returning to normal. (Margot Sanger-Katz, Claire Cain Miller and Quoctrung Bui for NY Times)

Today’s hero is former Mayor de Blasio Senior Adviser Alison Hirsh, who resigned after the mayor’s near-unconditional defense of the NYPD and will begin as an adviser to Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza in the Department of Education. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Now that the City Council and state legislature have rendered his opinion unnecessary for public debate, the mayor is in support of banning chokeholds and possible NYPD funding cuts. Always ready to take a stand one second after it doesn’t matter. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

“But right now we’re asking him to speak up, we’re asking him to stand behind his campaign, we’re asking him to stand behind his mission of equity, we’re asking him to just support us. He isn’t listening to us.” Why did Mayor de Blasio’s staffers protest him on Monday? (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Photos: Just because curfew is over does not mean the protests in support of Black Lives Matter have stopped. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Portraits: Why we are protesting. (Hiram Alejandro Durán for The City)

Officer Vincent D’Andraia was charged with assault for shoving a woman protesting to the ground. He’ll be charged with misdemeanor assault for the incident. The victim of his assault hit her head on the ground and sustained a concussion and seizure after the attack. (John Del Signore and JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Video: Wrapping up the NYPD union’s garbage rhetoric in one minute and nine seconds. (@bubbaprog)

One street in each of the five boroughs will be painted to send a message to New York City: Black Lives Matter, mirroring Washington DC’s tactics. The streets were not specified when the announcement was made. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Recent reports have been raising concerns that the NYPD’s Intelligence Division, along with the FBI, have been questioning protesters arrested on curfew violations about their political sympathies and affiliations, along with their social media behavior. This would violate a 35-year-old consent decree meant to keep the police from investigation protected political speech. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

A guide to New York City’s sculpture parks. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Sometimes you need to turn your mind off and look at a list of banal things. Here are 11 celebrities spending their quarantine in NYC. (Michele Petry for StreetEasy)

So you’ve optimized your bedroom and workspace while suffering through the quarantine for Covid-19, it’s time to turn your attention to some creative entryway ideas. (Erika Riley for StreetEasy)

Brooklyn’s Community Board 1, representing Greenpoint and Williamsburg, bought itself an SUV with public funds last year, which wasn’t the most popular decision. It was scheduled to hold executive committee elections this month, but the board has introduced a measure to suspend this year’s elections. Nothing like an old-fashioned power grab in the middle of a crisis. (Claudia Irizarry Aponte for The City)

Say farewell to whatever the hell “Rhode Island-style” pizza was supposed to be. After a year in the East Village, Violet is closing its doors. (Erika Adams for Eater)

A Bronx Democrat City Councilmember who has publicly said may vote for Trump, has made openly homophobic statements, and opposes abortion. Meet Rubén Díaz Sr., who wants to represent the Bronx in Congress. (Shane Goldmacher for NY Times)

“The winner in the 15th Congressional District will face untold numbers of issues in office next year. The candidate we believe will most closely align himself with the values and goals we hold dear is Ritchie Torres. And we know only too well that the election of Ruben Diaz, Sr., would be a tragic step backwards for the cause of equality and inclusion in American society.
-Paul Schindler for Gay City News, Progressives Must Unite Around Ritchie Torres in the Bronx

Photos: Congrats to the winners of Coney Island USA’s “Maskies” face mask competition. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Apartment Porn: An $2 million Hamilton Heights apartment with a roof deck as big as the apartment. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Harlem’s Schomburg Center released the Black Liberation Reading List, a list of 95 books that foster a greater understanding of Black history and culture. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

NYC restaurant reopening guide. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Thank you to reader Laura for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 9, 2020 – The “A Real Reason for the City’s Curfew” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: City Council investigates the police union, Mayor de Blasio’s staff protests him, what you can expect if you take the subway, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 84˚
Clear throughout the day.

The state Assembly passed the Eric Garner Anti-Chokehold Act. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Times goes deep on the backgrounds and possible motivations of Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman, who were arrested for allegedly throwing a Molotov cocktail into a police vehicle. (Nicole Hong and William K Rosenbaum for NY Times)

Bronx’s District Attorney Darcel Clark found “no criminality” in the death of Layleen Polanco, the 27-year-old Afro-Latina trans woman who died in her cell in Rikers Island a year ago. Polanco was in Rikers because she was unable to pay a $500 cash bail. Adding insult to injury is DA Clark’s use of Polanco’s deadname rather than her chosen name. (Harron Walker for Jezebel)

Video: A man drove his car through on the sidewalk through a group of peaceful protesters. After a week of beating the shit out of protesters all across the city for an entire week, watch the NYPD civilly confront him while arresting him. Yes, he was white, how did you know? (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

I hope you’re sitting down. The city’s police watchdog on Monday released its first-ever report on the NYPD’s treatment of young people, ages 10 to 18 — and found that boys who are black or Hispanic are disproportionately victims of cop misconduct. (Eileen Grench for The City)

A federal judge has ordered the NYPD to incorporate their formerly secret lists of police officers with dishonesty issues into an early intervention system, which will use data to identify officers exhibiting disturbing behavior. (George Joseph for Gothamist)

When the dust settles, remember who publicly defended the NYPD. Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg said she would not commit to reducing or eliminating her agency’s partnership with the NYPD. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

“In a critical time of vicious income inequality and racial disparity, he has shown New York City he is not an ally to progressives. Real New Yorkers take firm stances on tough issues…And it’s high time the Mayor decides whether or not he’s in favor of the NYPD’s aggression or people’s dignity.” -Nicholas Tamborra, the vice president of the Lambda Independent Democrats (LID), an LGBTQ political club in Brooklyn. (Duncan Osbourn for Gay City News)

The mayor may not be comfortable with defunding the police, but he’s 100% comfortable with defunding affordable housing. It’s an issue that he supposedly cares about, but in his proposed budget he cuts over a billion dollars from the Department of Housing Preservation and Development. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Let’s check in with the latest progress on the L train construction. It’s not terrible, so there’s some good news today. (EV Grieve)

A guide to the city’s reopening. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

The MTA wanted 60 miles of new busways for phase one of the city’s reopening. The mayor, never one to completely rise to any occasion, provided 20 miles of new busways on Jamaica Ave, Manhattan’s Fifth Ave, Brooklyn’s Jay Street, and E 181st St for car-free roads and four more for dedicated lanes. He also made the 14th St busway permanent. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor said in an interview that it was his fear of Governor Cuomo taking over the situation that led him to institute the city’s curfew. Did all of this happen because Mayor de Blasio and Governor Cuomo can’t see eye to eye on anything? (NY1)

While this piece is about Mayor de Blasio defending the detaining of protesters for over 24 hours, there’s a tidbit about a rumor of NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and Chief of Department Terence Monahan resigning. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The mayor won’t commit to a number when it comes to defunding the NYPD, but he’s made the smallest of changes. A small portion of the budget would be diverted to youth and social services for communities of color, the dollar amount is unknown. The NYPD won’t be responsible for overseeing street vendors, giving instead to a civilian agency. (Michael Dorgan for LIC Post)

“We have been fighting for this for years now, and this is just the bare minimum.” The reaction to the NYPD not overseeing street vendors wasn’t exactly met with a huge reaction. The NYPD had previously written 18,000 tickets per year to vendors. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The City Council’s Oversight and Investigations Committee is calling for an investigation of the NYPD union that released personal information on Chiara de Blasio’s arrest. The SBA, which City Councilmember Richie Torres called a hate group, tweeted her height, weight, and address, which is a violation of the city’s charter. SBA president Ed Mullins is already under investigation for declaring “war” on the mayor in February. (Brigid Gergin for Gothamist)

You can no longer hide behind your black wife and children, you are exposed now. We are in a time when we need your leadership and it’s not there.” -NYC Public Advocate Jumaane Williams about Mayor de Blasio. (Gloria Pazmino for NY1)

Looking for a safe space while protesting? The city’s theaters and museums are opening their lobbies to help you. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Hundreds of current and former Mayor de Blasio staffers gathered for a protest of the mayor for his failure to protect Black and brown residents of the city that he swore he would shield from racist policing. (Terrell Jermaine Starr for The Root)

Photos: The Green-Wood Cemetery tribute to New Yorkers lost to Covid-19. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Workers in Amazon’s Staten Island warehouse are suing the company to ask for safer working conditions. (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

14 notable NYC restaurants and bars that have now permanently closed. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Here’s what you can expect the next time you take the subway. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo announced the city can resume elective surgeries and ambulatory care. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Say hello to Scott Wiener, the owner of the world’s largest pizza box collection and the founder of Slice out Hunger and Scott’s Pizza Tours. How many boxes you ask? 1,550. (Anne Ewbank for Atlas Obscura)

Video: Rep. Carolyn Maloney, Suraj Patel, Pete Harrison, Lauren Ashcraft debate ahead of the primary for New York’s 12th Congressional District. (Gotham Gazette)

The Columbus Circle Target is expected to open this fall instead of its original July 19th date. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Child abuse cases are down 51%, this is worrisome. (Nikita Stewart for NY Times)

35 restaurants supporting the Black community. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Chelsea for today’s featured photo!