The Briefly for January 16, 2020 – The “Most Important Story Today: Our Mayor’s Dumb Bagel Order” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news update: A look at the propsoed Rock Center renovation, a guide to donating in NYC, the impeachment features a Queens vs Brooklyn fight, and more

Today – Low: 23˚ High: 49˚
Light rain in the morning.

The story of how Anne Carroll Moore successfully banned Goodnight Moon from New York’s Public Libraries for 25 years. (Dan Kois for Slate)

National Grid is digging a natural gas pipeline that runs through Bushwick and Williamsburg and connects to Maspeth. People are predictably angry. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

New Jersey tried to claim it has the best bagels. Stick to Bon Jovi and Springsteen, jerkwads. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

I don’t go out of my way to call Mayor de Blasio an idiot, even if 100% of respondents from The Briefly said they don’t think he’s doing a good job, but I can’t resist here. Our idiot mayor took to Twitter to declare the best bagel in New York is a toasted wheat bagel with cream cheese. Excuse me? Toasted wheat? What else would you expect from someone who eats pizza with a fork and loves the Red Sox? (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Here’s the best part of the “idiot mayor orders bagel for idiots” story. The very specific bagel he is referring to, toasted wheat with cream cheese from the Bagel Hole in Park Slope is not possible to get at the Bagel Hole. The Bagel Hole does not toast bagels or even own a bagel toaster. The mayor deleted the offending tweet. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

While were on the subject of politicians with bad bagel orders, let’s not forget Cynthia Nixon’s abomination of a bagel order. (Whitney Filloon for Eater)

The Parks Department needs to remove and move nearly 15,000 tons of lead-contaminated soil from the Red Hook ballfields. Where will it go? Concrete is being recycled in the city and the rest is being hauled off in trucks to a landfill in Falls Township, PA. (Helene Stapinkski for NY Times)

Governor Cuomo was in Puerto Rico this week to survey the damage done by the series of earthquakes that have plagued the island. This is a task that would any normal president would be doing, but we do not live in normal times. (Anna Gronewald for Politico)

The A/C/E lines have been approved for a signal upgrade, which should start later this year with the signals replaced from Columbus Circle to High St by 2025. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Onion: Top 10 things to do in New York City. (The Onion)

The Parks Department had plans to renovate Fort Greene Park, but the New York Supreme Court has decided that the 30-acre landscape would not be subject to a redesign or the removal of 83 mature trees until a proper environmental impact review is conducted. (Sydney Franklin for The Architect’s Newspaper)

New Brooklyn bars and restaurants to check out this winter. (Jennifer Indig for Brooklyn Based)

Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents continued to arrest people in and around New York courthouses in 2019, flouting a state directive to curtail such operations, according to a new report from the Immigrant Defense Project. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Photos: Buzz-a-Rama is the city’s last slot car raceway. Run by Frank “Buzz” Perri, Buzz-A-Rama is open on the weekends in Kensington from September through June. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The IDNYC program is now making cards available in braille and have added new perks for cardholders, including more free one-year memberships to cultural institutions and free admission to the Queens Botanical Garden on Wednesdays. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Congrats smokers, New York is the most expensive state for smokers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: Watch Christmas trees go from curb to mulch. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The state’s Board of Elections are considering buying a new system of voting machines that are less secure than our current systems, expensive, and can’t handle a ranked choice voting election, which we will see in the city in 2021. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

A guide to drinking and buying natural wine. (Hannah Howard for Grub Street)

Here are the eight candidates for Queens borough president that will be on the ballot on March 24: Council Members Jimmy Van Bramer, Costa Constantinides, Donovan Richards; former Council Member Elizabeth Crowley; former Assistant District Attorney Jim Quinn, police reform advocate Anthony Miranda, William Kregler, Danniel Maio, and Dao Yin. (Allie Griffin got Jackson Heights Post)

The city effectively deregulated a so-called “play street” located outside of a Park Slope middle school earlier this month, eliminating recreational space for students in favor of placard parking for teachers and faculty. In an even more incompetent move, the city claims the special designation of “play street” was revoked in 2014, but no one removed the sign until a few weeks ago. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

What should you do if you one across a seal? It may seem like a weird question in New York City, but this week there have already been three seal sightings reported across the city. First and foremost, don’t approach it. Are you some kind of marine mammal expert? You’re probably not. Call the New York Marine Rescue Center’s 24-hour hotline (631-369-9829). (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Spring cleaning is coming soon. A guide to donating your clothes, furniture, books, and electronics. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Renderings: See the proposed renovations to Rockefeller Center. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Christmas Tree in Rockefeller Center has been replaced by a giant peacock. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Renders: The Hudson Yards shared renderings of the next phase of development in an attempt to dispel rumors of plans to build a wall to separate the Western Yards from the rest of us plebes. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

Representatives Jerrold Nadler and Hakeem Jeffries from Brooklyn will serve as the house managers for the impeachment hearings in the Senate, setting up a Queens vs Brooklyn battle on a federal level. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Video: A walk from Wall Street to Downtown Brooklyn. (ActionKid)

A panel appointed by Mayor de Blasio and others intends to propose a public-private partnership to bailout thousands of taxi drivers trapped in exploitative loans that could cost as much as $500 million. (Brian M. Rosenthal for NY Times)

A look inside Brownie’s Hobby Shop, one of the city’s last true hobby shops. (Amanda Fairinacci for NY1)

Chief Martine Materasso is the first woman to lead the NYPD’s Bureau of Counterterrorism. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

Some answers, not satisfying ones but they’re still answers, about what the hell is going on with Grand Central’s lack of accessibility. (Shumita Basu for Gothamist)

20 stellar jewish delis. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The Briefly for January 14, 2020 – The “AOC vs Cuomo, Round 2” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The AG looks at the NYPD’s subway fare evasion, how Tiffany’s moved hundreds of millions in jewlery, the head of Brooklyn’s democrats resigns, and more

Today – Low: 40˚ High: 48˚
Possible light rain in the afternoon.

How do you move hundreds of millions of dollars in view of the public in NYC without getting robbed? Very carefully. Here’s the story of how Tiffany’s moved everything in its store overnight. (James Barron for NY Times)

Attorney General Letitia James announced on Monday that her office would investigate the NYPD and if its fare evasion policing in the subways has illegally targeted New Yorkers of color. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The winners and losers of the Queens bus network redesign. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Cuomo’s AirTrain is about to hit a new obstacle: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

There are thirteen million registered voters in New York state, with one million designated as “inactive,” and whose names were not on the voter rolls at election sites, which is a violation of the 14th Amendment and the National Voting Rights Act of 1993 according to a federal judge. While it may seem trivial, remember that the Queens DA race was decided by 55 votes. Moving forward, all registered voters’ names will be available at polling sites. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

Information on how to register to vote.

The leader of the Brooklyn Democratic Party, Frank Seddio, is stepping down amid concerns about the party’s and his own finances. Seddio is facing $2.2 million in lawsuits and the party’s cash reserves have dwindled from $505,000 in 2013 to $32,800 in 2019. (Aidan Graham and Kevin Duggan for amNewYorkMetro)

Photos: When it comes to the city’s skies, birds usually get all the attention. Don’t forget the city’s bats. (D. Bruce Yolton for Urban Hawks)

RIP Matthew Maher, owner of McSorley’s since the 60s. The bar is staying in the family, daughter Teresa Maher de a Haba is the owner now. (EV Grieve)

Here are the top ten checked out books in the NYPL’s history. You’ll notice a theme running through the list. “Goodnight Moon” did not make the list do to a personal vendetta against the book by children’s librarian Anne Carroll Moore. (Holly Louise Perry for Bowery Boogie)

Have you seen “The Geographic Center of NYC” in Woodside on the corner of 58th Street and Queens Boulevard? Besides being a cool piece of trivia it’s also completely wrong. If this isn’t the place, where is it? (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

If your usual subway station is outdoors, the winters can be brutal. A century ago, the IRT provided potbelly stoves in stations for its riders to stay warm while waiting for the train. (Ephemeral New York)

Signal problems ruined about four out of every five morning commutes in 2019, according to a new Riders Alliance analysis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The L train showdown is running ahead of schedule and should be completed by April, but not without some weekend closures. The MTA announced the weekends of January 17, February 14, and March 20 with closures from 8th Av to Broadway Junction. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

In addition to the L construction, the MTA announced emergency overnight construction was necessary on the G train this week through Friday night from midnight to 1:30am. (Greenpointers)

On a dry day, the MTA pumps 13 million gallons of water from its system. Monday’s water main break added half a million gallons to that, causing chaos on the 4, 5, 6, A, B, and C lines. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

It’s time to declare the days of the cooking competition celebrity chef over. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

It started as an argument between two dads about their kids near Dyker Park, but it turned into a double stabbing. One was stabbed in the chest and neck and the other was stabbed in the leg. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

In terms of housing and transportation costs, NYC ranks tenth in the nation, right after Houston but right before Minneapolis-St Paul. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: Baby Yoda has a mural in the East Village. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The plan to rezone Bushwick hit a possibly fatal roadblock Monday after city officials and local politicians failed to reach an agreement on affordable housing requirements. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The de Blasio administration testified at a 2019 City Council meeting that they did not have information about who was riding the heavily subsidized NYC Ferry system. The mayor used his insistence that the boats were being used by low-income New Yorkers as justification to dramatically expand the ferry system. It was all a lie, because the city’s Economic Development Corporation had already conducted two rider surveys that showed the median income of riders was over $100,000. For each rider on the ferry that pays $2.75, the city pays $9.34. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Vans opened Skate Space 198, a free indoor skatepark right off the Jefferson stop in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

NYCHA residents filed about 59,770 bug infestation complaints in the first nine months of 2019, according to the Legal Aid Society. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

What’s the best pizza in NYC? In honor of National Pizza Week, Patch asked politicians, comedians, and Broadway stars where to get their favorite slice. It’s mostly unconventional picks for the city’s best, even if Chuck Schumer’s pick is one of the closest pizza places to his apartment. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Mama’s Too, on the list, is rolling out a meatball parm that is already being described as “the city’s best meatball parm.” (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The Briefly for January 6, 2020 – The “Y2K Bug Arrives in NYC 20 Years Late” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The state’s new elevator safety law, a new minimum wage for (some) tipped workers, a Times Square institution closed, Brooklyn’s hottest restaurants, & more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 46˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

New York is the latest state to enact a state-wide elevator safety law, calling for state oversight of the elevator industry, establishing standards for elevator contractors, mechanics, and inspectors. Anyone think it’s weird this didn’t already exist? (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

It’s hard not to make Y2K jokes when the city’s parking meters stopped accepting credit cards on January 1, 2020. This is the second time in a year that a city’s system has malfunctioned as a result of a lack up upgrading software. (BenYakas for Gothamist)

Speaking of parking tickets, Corey Johnson is proposing a “day fine” system, which is common in Europe. Instead of a fixed fee, which unfairly burdens low-income people, fines would be representative of a percentage of a person’s daily income. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo vetoed the Securing Wages Earned Against Theft bill that would have allowed employees to freeze the assets of their employer while a wage theft case is pending. (Max Parrot for QNS)

Meet Josh and Benny Safdie, the directing duo behind Uncut Gems. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Did you know there’s a secret H subway train? It was renamed to the Rockaway Park Shuttle in 1993, but it’s still out there if you look carefully. (Tribeca Citizen)

12 new public art installations not to miss in January. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

The mayor’s reaction to multiple deaths on Third Avenue in Brooklyn is to lower the speed limit from 30mph to 25mph. Lowering the speed limit without enforcement is akin to doing nothing, so the mayor has also promised a step up in enforcement. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Chepe, the Nevins Street raccoon was captured. He’ll be living out his days known as Chepe, the Prospect Park raccoon. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The state has a new minimum wage law for tipped workers, which doesn’t include restaurant or bar workers. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

A look at the city’s new bail reforms from inside Manhattan’s criminal court. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A deep look at why some parents are freaking out about the city’s potential scrapping of the Gifted and Talented program. (Emily Shwake for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside The Deco, Midtown West’s new food hall. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The 13-year-old arrested in connection with Tessa Majors’s murder was denied a pre-trial release. and will remain in custody while awaiting the trial. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Times Square features the ridiculous version of everything. $30 Domino’s pizzas. A Red Lobster. And the planned TSX hotel will include an outdoor stage and ball drop suites. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Say farewell to the last of the “meat honkeytonks” in Times Square, Tad’s Steaks. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The Queens Public Library on the first floor of One Court Square will be closing at the end of the month. The library’s been in that location since 1989. If you remember, the building was supposed to become Amazon’s temporary office while their Long Island City campus was built, but since the deal fell through the developer of the building is making other plans. The library is looking for a new home. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

A dozen illuminated seesaws are coming to Broadway today (Monday) between 37th and 38th as part of the installation “Impulse.” The seesaws will create light and make music as well. Adding an installation in that spot is an annual tradition. Last year’s installation was an illuminated tunnel you could walk through that made sounds as people walked through it. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York is a city of signs, but of very few sign-painters. Travis Fitzsimmons of Prospect Lefferts Gardens makes hand-painted signs whose simplicity and style catch eyes. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Pizza Paradise, the nondescript and honestly sub-par pizza place in Flatiron, holds a secret. Inside is also Taste of Persia, which will be closing at the end of the month due to being told to close by the new owners. Owner Said Pourkay is looking for a new space. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Hells Angels’ supporters used to claim the block that housed their clubhouse on E 3rd was the safest block in the city. Some unknown gunmen tested that theory at their new clubhouse in Throggs Neck late on Thursday night. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Video: A look inside Joe’s Shanghai legendary soup dumplings. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The process hasn’t officially begun, but parents in Queens are organizing against desegregating schools in Kew Gardens, Forest Hills, Rego Park, and Jamaica. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Grand Street bike lane in Brooklyn is being upgraded today to physically separate cyclists from moving traffic and prevent drivers from parking in the bike lane. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

It’s the most mulch-iest time of year. (EV Grieve)

Fairway Market is filing for bankruptcy again. (David Cunningham for I Love the Upper West Side)

The city showed its support for the Jewish community over the weekend with a nearly 20,000 person march across the Brooklyn Bridge into Manhattan. (Christina Goldbaum and Matthew Sedacca for NY Times)

Photos: Inside the new East Village Trader Joe’s. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

A Chinatown bus with a station on Canal Street was involved in a horrific traffic accident early Sunday morning in Southwest Pennsylvania that killed five and injured sixty. (Bowery Boogie)

How can you make finding an apartment even less fun than it already is? Add Excel and decision matrices. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

You’ve got all week to prepare yourself. This weekend is The No Pants Subway Ride. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

In another depressing blow to sources of local news, amNewYork and Metro will be combining into one newspaper under the Schneps Media banner. It seems like Metro’s website will be eaten by amNewYork’s, which has been increasing filled using Associated Press stories instead of local reporters. The announcement doesn’t include the number of layoffs that will be involved. (amNewYork)

The hottest restaurants in Brooklyn for January. (Eater)