The Briefly for October 11-12, 2020 – The “SERENITY NOW!” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The Raccoon Show, Dermot Shea calls BLM protesters “spoiled brats”, cuffing season declared, the top 12 neighborhood pizza slices, and more

Today – Low: 55˚ High: 68˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

Midtown’s Roosevelt Hotel is closing at the end of the month after 96 years. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

There is a law in NYC that local police cannot enforce federal immigration law, that does not stop ICE agents from pretending to be local police during raids. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

When the city lacks its usual entertainment, it turns to the trash pandas. Welcome to The Raccoon Show. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Spider-Man 3 has begun filming in Queens. Look for the filming notices for “SERENITY NOW.” Yes, all of the fake filming titles for Spider-Man movies have been George Costanza references. (Jacob Kaye for amNewYork Metro)

Inside a Bronx freshman’s first day back in the classroom. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Maybe after this is all over, we should stop putting schools in windowless basements. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

The city owes its public school teachers $900 million, which dates back a decade and has its roots in the Bloomberg administration’s dealing of the last financial crisis. The city tried to punt on those payments until an arbitrator ruled the city must pay its teachers half of what is owed by the end of the month, the other half in July 2021 and agree to a no-layoffs provision through June 2021 along with teachers getting a 3.5% pay bump by May 2021. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A new state requirement will demand that 20% of all students and staff enrolled in in-person learning be tested weekly for Covid-19 inside the state’s “yellow” zones with the mandate in effect by Friday, October 16. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Farewell to Queens Comfort on 30th Ave in Astoria. Today is its last day of service. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Broadway will remain shut down through May 2021, extending past the last “end date” in March. (Broadway World)

Satire: Hundreds Of Cane-Wielding Demonstrators Pull Governor Into Kickline To Protest Broadway Shutdown. (The Onion)

Broadway is known as “The Great White Way” thanks to the volume of lights on the various marquees, but the nickname remains appropriate for other reasons too, as a new report shows that only 20% of shows on Broadway or Off-Broadway during the 2017-2018 season were created by people of color, two-thirds were filled by white actors and 94% directors were white. (Sahar Bahr for NY Times)

Had enough of apartment living in NYC and yearn for a life on the seas but still in the city? Here’s everything you need to know about houseboat living in NYC. (Cait Etherington for 6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio has chosen the city’s next rezoning battleground: SoHo and NoHo, from Astor Place down to Canal Street. The opponents say it will “ruin” the neighborhood’s character and the proponents argue that it will bring 3,200 apartments to the area, with 800 below-market rate. The deciding City Councilmember will be Margaret Chin, provided the city moves forward with approval before she’s term-limited out in 2021. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: There’s a house in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens that’s for sale that my wife is obsessed with. Once you see the photos of the $2.75 million pre-war house, you’ll become obsessed too. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Tribeca’s Pier 26 is now open, complete with a man-made tidal marsh called the Tide Deck. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The City Reliquary is in danger of closing. It’s one of the city’s oddest and most unique and interesting museums in addition to being a non-profit civic organization. In non-pandemic times, it is worth your visit. Now it needs your help. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

There will never be a story about the Grand Central Terminal lost and found that I will not link to. Years ago my best friend left an acoustic guitar on a Metro-North train and found it at the lost and found a few days later, just one of the roughly 2,500 items lost every month. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here is the full list of NYC politicians being endorsed by Our Revolution, founded by Bernie Sanders. (amNewYork Metro)

How much does a life cost? Last year Matt Palacios was killed by Luc C. Vu, who was driving a dump truck and made an illegal left turn. Court records indicate that Vu’s driver’s license has been revoked for six months, that he paid a $250 fine on the failure to yield to a bicyclist charge, and that he will receive a conditional discharge in one year if he does not get into additional legal trouble. $250 for taking Matt’s life. (Mike Johnson for PWInsider)

“I don’t know what you call them — peaceful protesters — maybe spoiled brats at this point.” -NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea on NY1. The NYPD is on pace to spend more than $100 million beyond its budget for overtime this year. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

On the same night that NYPD officers stood by while protesters attacked civilians and a journalist during a Borough Park protest against Covid-19 restrictions, the police department arrested four Black Lives Matter activists in Bedford-Stuyvesant for low-level offenses and detained them for two nights before they were released. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Video: Watch the NYPD be unable to break up a massive celebration full of unmasked people blocking a street in Crown Heights last week and eventually give up and go home. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Hundreds of ultra-Orthodox congregants attended an indoor prayer service in Borough Park on Friday in open defiance of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s newly imposed restrictions on religious gatherings in COVID hotspots. The service was led by a rabbi who tested positive for Covid-19 one week ago. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

MSG and the Barclays Center are becoming voting locations on November 3. Yankee Stadium? Silence. In a neighborhood that could use the most help from a neighbor, the Yankees, who pay $0 in real state taxes and pay $1/year for the land their stadium occupies, have turned their back on the local community at nearly every opportunity. (Mary Steffenhagen for New York City News Service)

Congratulations to the NYC girls who have become some of the first to ever join Scouts BSA, formerly the Boy Scouts of America. (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

The NYPL released a list of 200 book titles to get you election-ready. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Dizzy’s Diner in Park Slope after 22 years. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Turns out it pays to be in the crowd for SNL. No literally, the audience is being paid $150 to be considered cast members, since audience members aren’t allowed. Each “cast member” is given a rapid Covid-19 test before entering the studio. (Julia Jacobs and Dave Itzkoff for NY Times)

The Times is declaring cuffing season, but did the last cuffing season ever officially end? (Johan Engel Bromwich and Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

Farewell to 88 Lan Zhou in Chinatown, who will be closing on October 31. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The top 12 neighborhood pizza slices. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

How to support independent restaurants. (Bonnie Tsui for NY Times)

The Briefly for October 4-5 2020 – The “Is It Finally Time To Find A New Apartment?” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The mayor is robbing the city to pay for his ferries, delivering comforting words with your pizza, Hillary Clinton talks art, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 67˚
Clear throughout the day.

Have you been seeing comedy shows popping up in unconventional places? Well, it’s because comedy is technically illegal anywhere food and drinks are sold. (Sasha von Olderhausen)

The $100 million cut to the Sanitation department seems to have hit the Bronx the hardest. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Is this a good time to find a new apartment? (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Yeah, rents might be seeing a temporary drop, but it seems like New York City is still on its way to having the highest rent in the country. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A Human Rights Watch report called the NYPD’s actions against protesters on June 4 in Mott Haven “intentional, planned, and unjustified.” The mayor continues to defend the NYPD’s actions, but finally admitted the NYPD’s targeting and assault of legal observers was wrong. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayorally controlled city Economic Development Corporation diverted tens of millions of dollars in rent receipts from publicly owned Times Square real estate holdings to help operate the costly NYC Ferry system. In the middle of a pandemic and budget crisis, maybe it’s not the best time to steal from the city to pay for Mayor de Blasio’s pet projects. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

The MTA honored Medgar Evers by renaming the Franklin Ave and President St stations after the civil rights icon and the college that bears his name. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

There’s been enough happening this week before Rock Moranis was randomly punched in the head by a random attacker on Friday morning. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

If you need some comforting words, try ordering from Vinnie’s. In addition to your pizza you can get comforting words for $1. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

The house where Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny was written in is in Greenwich Village. On March 5, 1967, it was put on a flatbed truck on the Upper East Side and moved to where it sits today. (Sydney Rose for Atlas Obscura)

The MTA is getting some work done ahead of schedule at the Sutphin Blvd.-Archer Ave E train station, taking advantage of the moment’s low ridership. The work will conclude by November 2. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork Metro)

“The local government’s responsibility is to enforce the law.” – Governor Cuomo is making more threats towards the city, this time accompanied by a $10,000 daily fine for lack of enforcement. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Add the nearly 70-year-old Old John’s Luncheonette on the Upper West Side to the list of restaurants that have closed in the pandemic. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Things are awful. It’s okay to talk about art sometimes. Here’s an interview with Hillary Clinton about her love of Broadway. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

A guide to better understanding the city’s Covid-19 data. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Something strange is happening in Boro Park when it comes to Covid-19. Anonymous Yiddish robocalls are targeting Boro Park and Williamsburg urging people against getting tested “as this drives up the numbers,” in the Bobov Hasidic community, leaders are encouraging anyone who already had the virus to get tested to also drive the numbers down, and there are reports that some providers are withholding reporting test results. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Alright, it’s currently flu season and it’s been Covid-19 season since February. Here’s how to identify different symptoms of either. (Donald G. McNeil Jr for NY Times)

The biryani delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

This story is about how the governor sent Trump a “recovery basket” of buffalo wings, bagels, and cheesecake, but also did you know that Cuomo declared the official state snack to be Greek yogurt in 2014? (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

Holy shit, Cellino & Barnes’ Steve Barnes died in a plane crash. (Juliana Kim for NY Times)

Brooklyn’s Third Avenue claimed another life as a bicyclist was hit and killed by a motorcyclist on Saturday morning. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Staten Island to NYC regarding budget woes: “Don’t tread on me.” (Amanda Farinacci for NY1)

“The time to address this challenge is now – before the area’s growth and changes cause even more displacement. Industry City will grow and change even without their proposed rezoning. The campus will continue to attract more jobs and more residents. We cannot pretend these changes aren’t occurring. Sunset Park must vigorously preserve the affordable units it has, better protect tenants and begin to support development without displacement that creates truly and permanently affordable housing.”
-Michelle de la Uz, Executive Director of Fifth Avenue Committee & Neighbors Helping Neighbors, Industry City is dead, but Sunset Park still needs help for amNewYork Metro

NYC has a corn maze. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The Bronx Zoo’s holiday light show is returning this November for something to do outdoors while we’re still locked indoors. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Everything is canceled, so here are 8 places to personally celebrate Oktoberfest. (Davin Gannon for 6sqft)

Thanks to reader Sarah for today’s featured photo from the Staten Island side of the Verrazzano.

The Briefly for September 11-12, 2020 – The “Let’s Eat Some Indoor One Dollar Sushi” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining is coming back to NYC, sixteen teachers test positive for Covid-19 before students come back, outdoor happy hours, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 81˚
Rain and humid throughout the day.

16 New York City teachers have tested positive for Covid-19 in 16 different schools. Schools open on September 21. (East New York News)

Photos: Inside the abandoned City Hall subway station, which served as the inspiration for the Turtles’ lair in the second Ninja Turtles movie. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The Times asks the impolite question: What happens when no one invites you into their quarantine pod? (Ronda Kaysen for NY Times)

September 30, indoor dining is back at 25% capacity. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

Indoor dining will increase to 50% on November 1 if cases don’t significantly increase, just in time for outdoor dining to end on October 31. The state and city, of course, are giving restaurants less than a month to get their indoor areas ready and overhaul their HVAC systems. Many restaurants will have to make a choice is opening their doors at 25% capacity is financially worth opening their doors at all. (Erika Adams for Eater)

An epidemiologist weighs in on the question of how safe is indoor dining? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

There’s a new Whole Foods in Brooklyn, but no one is allowed inside. (Chris Crawley for Grub Street)

Okay, let’s jump into this. Is dollar sushi any good? (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: A $5.75 million brownstone in Harlem with a secret garden. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Activists are calling on the MTA to fire two of their employees, Willion Wurm Jr and William Wurm, who drove through demonstrators near Times Square during a Black Lives Matter protest this summer. The MTA will not fire the employeees. (Stephan Nessen for Gothamist)

A look at the CDC’s eviction moratorium for tenants who can’t pay rent and make under $99,000 annually. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Farewell to the Hilton hotel in Times Square. (Rich Bockmann for The Real Deal)

What could make your commute worse between Bedford Ave and Manhattan? Someone who is FaceTiming the entire time. The L train tunnel is the first train tunnel to get cell signal. (Greenpointers)

Meet Jenny Olbrich, the Greenpoint’s Pizza Girl. (Greenpointers)

A look at the “For ⟶ forever” mural by Mierle Laderman Ukeles that’s on display outside the Queens Museum. (Jane Margolies for NY Times)

Delaware, Maryland, Ohio, and West Virginia were added to New York’s quarantine list for travelers. (NY1)

City Comptroller Scott Stringer officially kicked off his 2021 mayoral bid on Tuesday with a speech taking aim at the city’s real estate industry. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

It’s that wonderful time of the year again: It’s time for goats to cut the grass. (EV Grieve)

As the title says, “Everything you need to know about NYC’s Open Streets Restaurants program.” (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

A 15-year-old Brooklyn boy was charged on Tuesday with five counts of attempted murder in a J’Ouvert shooting that left a 6-year-old boy, his mother, and three men wounded. (Ed Shanahan and Ashley Southall for NY Times)

James Gordon Bennett Medal is one of the FDNY’s highest honors, but it’s named for the published of The New York Herald newspaper, who pushed racist and segregationist views during the Civil War. The award will be renamed in honor of Chief Peter J. Ganci, who was the highest-ranked uniformed member of the FDNY killing in the 9/11 attacks. (Ali Watkins for NY Times)

Christian Cooper, the bird watcher who had the police called on him for insisting a dog be put on a leash. has turned his experience into a graphic novel about racism. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

Did you miss the earthquake that happened early in the morning on Wednesday? Yes, there was an earthquake. Just toss it on the pile for 2020. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Angry Upper West Siders that threatened to sue the city after homeless shelter residents were temporarily moved into neighborhood hotels are celebrating the decision to move the 300 residents of one hotel back into traditional shelter facilities. NIMBY indeed. (Caroline Lewis for Gothamist)

Patricia Marroquin Norby is the Met’s first-ever full-time Native American curator and will assume the role of associate curator for Native American art. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

The Covid-19 pandemic hit NYC neighborhoods the hardest that were already experiencing the greatest rent burden, according to new research from StreetEasy. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Meet “Red Rage” Assistant Chief Christopher McCormack, who has the most credible misconduct allegations of any NYPD officer. Over a dozen Black and Latino men accused McCormack of touching them inappropriately during searches or ordered others to do so. Despite the complaints, he kept being promoted. (Joaquin Sapien for The City)

A guide to Central Park’s “Great Trees.” (Amanda Quaid for Untapped Cities)

Some gyms are open in the city, but indoor fitness classes remain banned. A group of boutique fitness studios is suing the city for $250 million in damages over the ban (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Ride the subway without a mask? $50 fine. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Century 21 declared bankruptcy and will be closing its stores. (Christopher Bonanos for Curbed)

A new study from the CDC says adults with Covid-19 were twice as likely to say they ate at a restaurant. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Tiffany Cabán launched her campaign for City Council for district 22, which encompasses Astoria, East Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, Woodside, and Rikers Island. If she wins her election, it would put her in control of rezoning Rikers Island after it has been vacated. (Clarissa Sosin for Queens County Politics)

The outdoor happy hour guide. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)