The Briefly for September 22 – 24, 2020 – The “Anarchist Rat Cluster Jurisdiction” Tuesday Edition

Tuesday’s NYC news digest: The NYPD Chinese spy, RBG’s statue may have a home, the MTA’s bad day, indoor dining, some kids reutrn to school, and more

Today – Low: 59˚ High: 72˚
Clear throughout the day.

Everything known about outdoor dining, which kicks up again on September 30. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

It was a bad day for the MTA as an A train derailed inside the 14th St/8th Ave station as a result of “an act of vandalism” and the person responsible has reportedly been arrested. (Jen Chung and John Del Signore for Gothamist)

A 40-year-old man was fatally struck by a Manhattan-bound Q train during the evening rush hour on Monday at the Cortelyou Road Station in Flatbush. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

There were 295 subway windows smashed so far this year, which represents a 64% increase over last year. Reminds me of the Dumbo Car Window Smasher from a dozen years ago. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s been five years since Pizza Rat. Say hello to the rat cluster, a living nightmare for all to see. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

New York City is now an “anarchist jurisdiction” in the eyes of the federal government. As stupid as this new title is, it is setting the stage for a fight over federal funding for the city. (Monique Judge for The Root)

It wouldn’t be a story without a “Twitter responds to…” post about it. (Elyse Wanshel for HuffPost)

“The president can’t supersede the law and say ‘I’m going to make those funds basically discretionary funds,’ which is what he would have to do. He doesn’t control federal funding. Federal law controls federal funding.” –Governor Cuomo on the designation. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Brooklyn Bridge Park may be the home of Governor Cuomo’s planned statue honoring Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

In a quote that he will eventually regret saying, Mayor de Blasio said “I feel very good about the trajectory we’re on” regarding the first day of schools being open to students. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

An interactive map showing which schools had recent Covid-19 cases. (Jake Dobkin, Clarisa Diaz for Gothamist)

46% of city students opted for remote learning, up from last week’s 42%. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Congrats to Punkie Johnson, the first out Black lesbian member to join SNL. (Matt Tracy for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s ban on plastic bags will be enforced starting on October 19. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Photo Essay: Phil Buehler’s Bushwick: Art or Garbage. (Phil Buehler for Bushwick Daily)

Photo: Take a look at all the ways to cross the Brooklyn Bridge in 1903. (Ephemeral New York)

Photo: A subway tribute to RBG. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Are restaurant “space bubbles” a good idea or just another sad reality in 2020? (Bao Ong for Time Out)

Nearly 90% of NYC bars and restaurants were unable to pay full rent in August, with 34% unable to pay any rent at all. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The week’s most batshit-wild story is the story of an NYPD officer that is accused of spying on Tibetans for China. (Nicole Hong for NY Times)

The DOE’s long-promised vow to make yeshivas violating state education requirements start teaching the subjects they’re supposed to is once again falling behind. This is one of the longest running stories of Mayor de Blasio’s failure to stand up for what is right in the city and it will continue to roll on. The city blew its deadline to produce a timeline for when state-mandated instruction would be in place and missed another deadline to finish meetings by June. This all started when he deliberately hid this failure from the public so he could convince Albany he was capable of running the city’s schools and he’ll run out the clock without doing literally anything about it. (Reuven Blau for The City)

State Attorney General Letitia James has stepped in and declared that her office will release body camera footage of police-involved deaths after previously leaving it up to local jurisdictions. This was spurred by the death of Daniel Prude in Rochester. (Sydney Periera for Gothamist)

A look at mayoral candidate and City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s affordable housing plan. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

The best outdoor date night spots in NYC, while it’s still warm enough for an outdoor date. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Apartment Porn: Inside the amenities in Long Island City’s Skyline Tower, like the pet spa and 75-foot pool. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A bike brisket tour of NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to reader Reynard Loki for today’s featured photo

The Briefly for March 2, 2020 – The “Yes, We Are All Out of Hand Sanitizer” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news edition: NY and NYC get approval for coronavirus testing, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, the East Village’s best restaurants, and more

Today – Low: 46˚ High: 57˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

The MTA will shut down the F train on nights and weekends beginning on March 21 through next year to install and upgrade the line’s signals between Church and Stillwell Ave. Who on planet earth decided it was a good idea that one of the trains that beings people to Coney Island should be out of commission for the entire summer? (Irina Groushevaia for Bklyner)

February 2020 was the second-smallest snow on record in New York City since records began in 1868. Technically it snowed the smallest bit on Saturday, Leap Day. In all of winter so far, we’ve had 4.8″ total, compares to 61.9″ nine years ago. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s plan to convert basement apartments into legal apartments is hitting one significant problem: reality. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

The state has confirmed its first Coronavirus (COVID-19) case, and it’s in Manhattan. The woman in her late 30s who contracted the virus had traveled to Iran and is now isolated in her home. People who had close contact with the patient have already been identified. The New York Health Commissioner, Dr. Oxiris Barbot, has called the spread to other New Yorkers from this woman “low risk.” (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The city and state both received approvals for testing the Coronavirus, previously the city had been sending potentially contaminated samples via FexEd to the CDC in Atlanta. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

Looking for hand sanitizer only to find out that it’s sold out? You’re not alone. Also, washing your hands for 20 seconds will prevent the spread of disease better than hand sanitizer. (Julie Creswell for NY Times)

For the COVID-19 paranoid person in your life: The Wuhan Virus: How to Stay Safe. (Laurie Garret, a Pulitzer Prize winning science writer, for Foreign Policy)

There are five works by Isamu Noguchi on display in New York City outside of the Noguchi Museum in Long Island City. Once of those pieces, an installation in the lobby of 666 Fifth Avenue, is in danger of being disassembled thanks to a pending renovation by the building’s new owners. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Staten Island’s City Councilmember Joe Borelli doesn’t like speed camera tickets or the Reckless Driver Accountability Act, he should know because he’s earned himself five tickets issued by speed cameras. 22 pedestrians have been killed by drivers in 2020. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Miss Staten Island Madison L’Insalata came out as bisexual and was promptly banned from marching in last weekend’s Staten Island St Patrick’s Day parade. Another pageant winner who showed support for her was also banned. Congrats Staten Island, you’re the worst. (CBS News)

Photos: Over at the Queens “St. Pat’s for All” Parade, the mayor, Speaker Corey Johnson Senator Chuck Schumer, AOC, and other federal and local officials marched and partied. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The former president of the Stonewall Democratic Club is eyeing a seat on the City Council in Queens. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

10 surprising places to discover on Queens Blvd. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Video: How many of the places can you see in this video of the East Village in the 1960s are still there today? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Most of the city’s remaining public phone booths will be removed. Not on the list for removal are the phone booths which offers free calls on West End and 66th, 90th, and 100th Streets. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Yes, plastic bags are banned in NYC, but the Department of Environmental Conservation is delaying enforcement of the ban until April 1. (Marie J. French for Politico)

Back in October, Andy Byford submitted a letter of resignation to the MTA that he would later retract, only to quit again at the beginning of the year. Freedom of Information Law requests have been filed to reveal the letters and the MTA claims to “not have it is its possession.” (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

If you graduated high school in New York, you know the stress of the Regents exams. All that may change. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

The Department of Education released a new recommended reading catalog that represents a wider range of diversity to the authors and book subjects. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

It took drivers less than 24 hours to destroy the city-installed bike and “protection” on 13th St. An example of how plastic barriers are useless. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

An investigator with the Office of Special Narcotics Prosecutor, Stephen Abreu, punched a bouncer in the face and fired two gunshots inside the bar because his drunken attempts to flirt with women were failures, according to first-hand accounts and a police report. Stephen Abreu was suspended from work, arrested and charged with felony attempted murder, reckless endangerment, attempted assault, menacing, and more. For some reason, he was released without bail when his charges qualify for bail. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Say farewell to Islanders games at the Barclays Center. They’ll finally be returning to Long Island. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

New York is the most tax burdened in the country according to a new analysis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

28 restaurants that define the East Village. (Stefanie Tuder for Eater)

The Briefly for February 28, 2020 – The “I Got About Five Friends Left” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The forever feuds between governors and mayors, who gave money to what candidate in your zip code, the best cocktails under $10, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 26˚ High: 43˚

What was the point of making the NYPD to wear body cameras if the Civilian Complaint Review Board, the very people who are supposed to have oversight of the NYPD, have to request the footage form the NYPD? (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are a lot of things that contributed to the Lower East Side gaining near-mythical status. Each story isn’t enough to turn a set of streets into a phenomenon on its own, but when combined into one tightly-packed neighborhood, it almost seems impossible that it was ever real at all two decades later. One of those places was Rainbow Shoe Repair, a cobbler’s shop that became the place to be photographed. Now some of those photographs have become an exhibition that will be touring the Lower East Side, including some displayed outside the Abrons Arts Center. (Untapped New York with photos by Daniel Terna)

Why is it that Chipotle is always front and center when it comes to labor law violations by fast food companies? (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Are New York governors and city mayors destined to feud forever? Governor Pataki, in his new books, says Mayor Giuliani asked him to cancel the 2001 mayoral elections so he would be able to stay in office longer after the 9/11 attacks. Giuliani denied the claim, but forgot to hangup the phone and said “I got about five friends left.” I’d feel bad for him if he wasn’t such a ghoul. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

If you want one last taste of receiving plastic bags when shopping in NY, make a point to do your shopping on Saturday. Sunday starts the plastic bag ban. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Are you one of the 9% of New Yorkers that would give up sex if you never had to deal with parking a car in the city? (Beth Dedman for amNewYork Metro)

This is a true Trump to City: Drop Dead moment. The Trump administration stopped a feasibility study, looking at how New York and New Jersey could be protected from future weather events like Superstorm Sandy. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

A driver killed a seven-year-old boy in East New York, making it the second child killed by the driver of a vehicle in three days in the neighborhood. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

The Chinatown building that housed the Museum of Chinese in America archives and was destroyed by a five-alarm fire in January will be demolished and rebuilt. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

In 2018 the city enacted a program where you could get paid 25% of a fine to report idling cars and trucks, which would be a payout ranging from a $75 to $500. There was the billboard campaign featuring cartoon birds reminding everyone to stop idling their cars. Clearly that didn’t work, because the city is back with a new campaign featuring Billy Idol entitles “Billy Never Idles.” Despite the campaign, filing a complaint through the city’s 311 app is not possible. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The “I Wanna Quit the Gym” bill passed the state senate and i headed to the assembly. Pretty soon you’ll be able to cancel that NYSC membership that accidentally renewed because you forgot about it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

No one has tested positive for coronavirus in the city or state, but that hasn’t stopped the growing anxiety of knowing it’ll be on our doorstep sooner or later. The city and state say they are prepared with plans for hospitals, schools, mass transit, businesses and mass gatherings along with supplies at the ready and $40 million in funding to fight the virus. (Joseph Goldstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The NYPL is about to debut their first-ever permanent exhibition entitled “Treasures,” with items from the archives like a copy of the Declaration of Independence in Thomas Jefferson’s handwriting, original Mozart and Beethoven sheet music, Sumerian tables, and more. “Treasures” will open in November. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Department of Transportation rejected an idea to move the Queens Blvd bike lane to the road’s median, but that didn’t stopp the mayor from publicly asking “what’s the harm in considering this idea that the DOT already said was a bad idea?” (Garsh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

This weekend starts the first #Never Bloomberg march at his townhouse on the Upper East Side, protesting his police surveillance of Muslims, stop and frisk, the homelessness spike under his watch, and the list goes on and on. The march is being lead by multiple groups, including the Working Families Party, who never endorsed Bloomberg for mayor in 2001, 2005, or 2009. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

Congrats, Brooklyn. You’ve officially made it, being named TripAdvisor’s #5 trending destination in the United States. (Irina Groushevaia for BKLYNER)

The Brooklyn Public Library and the Brooklyn Historical Society have announced a new plan to merge. Jennifer Schuessler for NY Times)

As if having to go to New Jersey wasn’t enough of a punishment, a broken signal added insult to insult on Thursday’s evening rush hour commute, causing hour-long delays that began at 5:30. Sounds lovely. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Mayor Bloomberg took credit for getting gay marriage passed in New York, Governor Cuomo remember a different version of that story. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Video: A slide show on New York in the 1910s. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

A week-long staycation in NYC. (Pardon Me For Asking)

Here are all the ways you pay taxes when you buy a home in the city. (Localize.Labs)

Who does New York support for president, financially? (RentHop)

The best cocktails for $10 and under. (Julien Levy for Thrillist)