The Briefly for July 27, 2020 – The “Do You Think He’s Talking About Me?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city expands the Open Streets programs by 0.1 miles, the NYPD won’t stop using the illegal chokehold, the world’s tallest residential building, & more

Today – Low: 81˚ High: 93˚
Humid throughout the day.

Have you had Covid-19? According to the CDC, a quarter of New Yorkers have had it this year. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Apartment Porn: Inside the apartments inside Central Park Tower, the world’s tallest residential building. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Is there any question that when the governor says “Local government, step up and do your job,” he's specifically talking about Mayor de Blasio? The State Liquor Authority issued 37 violations for violating social-distancing measures on Friday, most of them inside the city. He threatened to shut down all bars and restaurants unless "local government" steps up in enforcement. On the list in the city was Cipriani Downtown, Aqua, in Belmont, Guaro’s Tapas Bar and La Pollera Colorado II in Jackson Heights, Set L.E.S. on the Lower East Side, and Kandela in Ozone Park. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Mayor de Blasio has once again suspended alternate side parking, this time until August 2. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

The mayor added 2.87 miles to its Open Streets program, but also removed 2.77 miles from the Open Streets program, ultimately adding 0.1 miles to the total open streets. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The Covid-19 pandemic exposed the inequalities of the city’s design. 1.1 million New Yorkers don’t live within a 10-minute walk of a public park. When the city closed the playgrounds, it meant those New Yorkers lost their only public space. In a poor neighborhood, the average park is 6.4 acres, in a wealthy neighborhood, it averages 14 acres. In predominantly Black neighborhoods, the parks are 7.9 acres. In predominantly white neighborhoods, they are 29.8 acres. (Winnie Hu and Nate Schweber for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s Open Streets program was supposed to balance out some of this inequity, but the Open Streets program favors wealthier neighborhoods in Brooklyn, Queens, and Manhattan. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

A Covid-19 funding moratorium has frozen any fixes that were scheduled to be made at more than 20 NYCHA playgrounds, keeping them closed or mid-construction. (Reuven Blau for The City)

The New York Giants released kicker Aldrick Rosas after he was arrested for an alleged hit-and-run last month. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

The city’s Restaurant Revitalization Program comes with some interesting strings attached. The program is awarding $30,000 grants to 100 restaurants in target neighborhoods identified by the city’s Racial Inclusion and Equity Task Force, but part of accepting the grant is agreeing to pay employees full minimum wage, not inclusive of tips, to all workers within five years of returning to regular business practices. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Chief of Department of the NYPD, Terence Monahan, says that NYPD officers “can’t be afraid” of using a now-illegal chokehold and “We can’t be afraid of what we do. We can’t walk away.” (Ishena Robinson for The Root)

It’s no wonder that voices calling for NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea’s ouster are growing while the public sees no discipline for cops who flagrantly use violence against the citizens they serve. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Where to eat outside in Astoria. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The New York Civil Liberties Union is fighting a gag order preventing them from publishing a vast database containing NYPD disciplinary records. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

While we don’t have those records, there is now a searchable database of closed cases of every active-duty police officer who had at least one substantiated allegation against them. (Derek Willis, Eric Umansky and Moiz Syed for ProPublica)

If you’ve ever seen the lakes in Prospect Park in the summer, you know about the algae that bloom over the water’s surface, giving it the water the appearance of a solid green surface. The city feels compelled to put up signs warning that it is, indeed, a lake and not a solid surface. (Reuven Blau for The City)

The President backed out of an offer that he claims came from Yankees president Randy Levine to throw out the first pitch at Yankee Stadium on August 15, stating he’ll do it “later in the season.” (Tim Moran for Patch)

Giancarlo Stanton and Aaron Hicks have begun kneeling during the national anthem before Yankees games and have the support of multiple teammates. (Thomas Carannante for Yanks Go Hard)

“We all deserve better than a careless Major League Baseball organization that consistently ignores the surrounding community while pandering to an unapologetic white supremacist like Donald Trump.” -Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside the newly reopened Central Park Zoo. (Scott LYnch for Gothamist)

The state’s interim commissioner of education is quitting after 8 months. She replaced another interim commissioner of education who quit after two months. She replaced the commissioner of education who quit last August. Multiple deputy commissioners have also quit over the last year. What’s going on over there? (Reema Amin for Chalkbeat)

Neiman Marcus is closing its flagship at Hudson Yards, looking ahead to life after the pandemic, stating customers’ shopping habits aren’t likely to go back to how they once were. Developers are already trying to lease the space for offices instead of retail. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Green-Wood cemetery is looking for an artist-in-residence to make the cemetery the inspiration for their art from January through September. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

New York state is suing President Trump over his attempt to exclude undocumented immigrants from the Census. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

The Times takes a hard and depressing look at the block in Midtown surrounding the Time & Life Building, calling its current dead state “omen for the city’s future.” (Michael Wilson for NY Times)

The first eviction cases have been filed since Governor Cuomo’s initial moratorium expired. His extension is not as extensive, leading to the first look at an expected tidal wave headed towards the city once the extension ends. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

Where to eat outside in Woodside and Sunnyside. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for June 23, 2020 – The “Are These NYC’s Bad Old Days?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: It’s primary day in NYC, a look at the rules of outdoor dining in phase two, surprising chickens in a drug bust, the NY Post’s “copaganda,” and more

Today – Low: 73˚ High: 82˚
Possible drizzle overnight.

Here’s how to vote in today’s primary. (BKLYNER)

Today is the primary across the city, but don’t expect results so quickly this time around. Absentee ballots aren’t counted until eight days past the election. We could be waiting a while. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

In the hall of fame of bad ideas, let me introduce you to the stacked highways all across Manhattan idea from the 1930s. (Joshua Mu for Viewing NYC)

After a spike in gun violence over the weekend, the mayor said the city isn’t going back to the bad old days where there was “so much violence in this city,” but also “Nor are we going back to the bad old days where policing was done the wrong way.” According to that statement, we are currently living in “the bad old days.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

With phase two, the city’s playgrounds have reopened. They are literally no safer than they used to be, so don’t expect sanitization or regular cleanings. (Donna Duarte-Ladd for amNewYork Metro)

The city formally announced that phase two would start on Monday on Thursday, giving restaurants four days to prepare and comply with a new set of regulations for outdoor dining. (Gary He for Eater)

What to expect from phase two of NYC’s reopening. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Here are the guidelines for reopened restaurants as a part of phase two. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

More than 3,000 restaurants have signed up to set up outdoor dining as the city enters the second phase of its reopening. The restaurants approved will be allowed to set up tables and chairs in parking spaces and sidewalks. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The state moratorium on evictions ended over the weekend. There are advocacy groups that are estimating 50,000 – 60,000 cases could be filed in the next few days. This is the first wave of expected cases, another protection for people who were directly affected by Covid-19 expires in August. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

Hundreds of people gathered in protest to demand the eviction ban continues until the state has recovered from the Covid-19 crisis. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An investigation is ongoing after a man fell onto the tracks and was hit and killed by the 7 train on Sunday night. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

“Back in my day, if you wanted to go to a Target, you had to go to Brooklyn, the Bronx, or New Jersey” is what very lame grandparents will tell their grandkids. Target announced it is opening stores on the Upper East and West Sides. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Facebook is eyeing expanding its footprint in the Hudson Yards, taking over the space that will be left vacant by Neiman Marcus’s bankruptcy. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos and Video: 10,000+ riders took part in the Street Riders’ Black Lives Matter Ride through Manhattan. Fun fact, more people showed up for the ride than turned out for Trump’s Tulsa rally. (Amanda Hatfield, photos by Toby Tenenbaum for BrooklynVegan)

Heads up: The produce at this week’s farmers markets should be fantastic. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Thanks to a loophole about how the NYPD’s cars are funded, the two lawyers that are accused of tossing Molotov cocktails into empty police cars may be facing life in prison. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A look at the NY Post’s recent history of running “copaganda” articles that share police narratives with anonymous sourcing, zero additional verification, and in contradiction of facts. (Kay Dervishi for City and State)

The NYPD are known liars. Despite their crying in public about being “poisoned” by Shake Shack employees, a thorough review shows that the officers involved never displayed any symptoms of illness and the Shake Shack employees couldn’t have known that the order was for NYPD officers because the order was placed online. Despite this, police unions sent out information that the officers had started throwing up and invented a narrative of Antifa employees inside Shake Shack. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea testified in defense of the police’s actions against protesters during the first week of June without providing details and dodging every possible question that involved specifics and dismissed a delivery person’s arrest as a “false report.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Look around the city and you’ll see iconic statues wearing face masks. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

What is usually the best party in the city every year, the Mermaid Parade, is going to be virtual and take place on August 29. (Amanda Hatfield for Brooklyn Vegan)

The Inwood rezoning lawsuit, which was ruled that the de Blasio administration failed to account for the potential change in the racial makeup of the neighborhood, could forever change how the city plans neighborhoods towards something more equitable. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Members of Sure We Can, the city’s only nonprofit redemption center, is requesting $2.3 million from the city’s budget, saying they will have to close their Bushwick location that it has occupied for ten years without it, where hundreds of canners gather each morning to sort and redeem their bottles and cans.  (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Video: The surprising part of this drug bust was unrelated to the drugs, it was the chickens. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The man who tried to escape Rikers Island on Thursday made another attempt to escape on Sunday. According to inmates at Rikers, the measures taken to combat Covid-19 have made Rikers intolerable. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Okay, phase two is in effect, but let’s look at what phase three could mean for the city. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

28 restaurants open for outdoor dining this week. (Eater)

The Briefly for June 17, 2020 – The “Don’t Believe What Cops Say” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Playgrounds will open with phase 2, the mayor finally gets a coronavirus test, the AG’s hearing on NYPD interactions during protests, and more

Today – Low: 65˚ High: 74˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

You can watch the Public Hearing Via Video Conference on Police/Public Interactions During Recent Protests at that link at 11am on Wednesday.

Nine protesters detail their violent encounters with the NYPD. (Sydney Pereira, Jake Offenhartz, and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Why the hell are NYPD cruisers playing ice cream man music? This isn’t an isolated incident and there is a video. (Luke Fater for Atlas Obscura)

The first wave of lawsuits against the NYPD has begun, with 18 notice of claims being lodged with City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office. (Reuven Blau for The City)

The lesson from yesterday’s story about the NYPD poisoning that never was is clear: Stop believing the police. (Ashley Reese for Jezebel)

The moment is demanding it, but is the NYPD capable of reform? (Nate File for Bedford + Bowery)

A new policy mandates that body cam footage when the NYPD’s weapons are fired. I hope we’re all ready for a million reasons why cameras “malfunction.” (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The 1.8 acre 50 Kent pop-up park will open on July 9 on a part-time basis from Thursday to Sunday from 10am to 6pm. (Greenpointers)

Mayor de Blasio announced that playgrounds will reopen in the city’s second phase of reopening. Yeah, it sucks, but we’re all fighting that same anxiousness in service of a greater good. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

It hasn’t been confirmed that we’ll be hitting phase 2 on June 22, and if we don’t, it’s because of assholes like Dani Zoldan on the Upper West Side, who has been running comedy shows inside Stand Up NY, the comedy club he owns. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Oh, look, more assholes. State Senator Simcha Felder, Assemblyman Simcha Eichenstein, and Councilman Kalman Yeger decided their community in Midwood has had enough of being careful and used a grinder to open the chains keeping the Kolbert Playground closed. (Lindsay Tuchman for NY1)

When CMJ announced it was coming back, a virtual festival wasn’t what we pictured. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

The stoop is the new bar. And the new restaurant. And everything else too. (Marie Solis for Gothamist)

A look at Dennin Winser’s hand-painted signs, which he’s offering for free for Black-owned businesses. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Sometimes a headline is perfect. A gay socialist could be the first LGBTQ person of color in the New York legislature. Get to know Jabari Brisport. (Molly Sprayregen for LGBTQ Nation)

Ahead of the June 23 primary, Attorney General Letitia James opened a hotline for election issues. If you haven’t applied for an absentee ballot already, you’ll be voting in person. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city is providing free air conditioners for eligible households this summer. There are a few different guidelines to qualify and it’s best to check before it starts getting unreasonably warm. (East New York News)

Someone hung a noose inside Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem. The Hate Crimes Task Force is investigating. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Should you sign a new lease right now? Rents look like they might be on the decline through the end of the year. (Nancy Wu for StreetEasy)

Kudos to the MTA for their creative social distancing decals on the subway. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped Cities)

We’ve all seen photos of the Unisphere in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, but have you thought about it represents? It’s meant to be a celebration the start of the Space Age, symbolize the theme of the 1964 World’s Fair “Peace Through Understanding” and also a part of Robert Moses’s plans for New York City. (Lillia Paynch for Untapped New York)

Juneteenth isn’t a recognized holiday in New York, but we could be on the road to changing that. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

Photos: What Michelin-starred restaurant takeout looks like. (Gary He for Eater)

This year’s 4th of July hot dog eating championship will happen without a crowd and will be in a secret location, leaving this the first year in a long time without the competition at the corner of Surf and Stillwell. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

The U.S. Open tennis tournament will also be held without a crowd this summer. I hope they fill the stands with stuffed animals and sex dolls like the Korean baseball teams have. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Hospitals and group homes can now accept visitors with their discretion. (Emily Davenport for Gothamist)

Housing courts in the state are starting to reopen, but there’s some confusion over if evictions are allowed to resume. With no additional guidance, Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks’s order from March halting evictions stands, but with pushback from eviction-hungry attorneys and landlords. (Georgia Kromrei for The Real Deal)

The state and city government is trying to get anyone who thinks they’ve been exposed to Covid-19 to get tested. If that’s the case, why were less than 100 prisoners tested over the first two weeks of June? (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

Never trust the first thing Mayor de Blasio says. After taking a sick day on Monday and spreading the message that he didn’t feel there was a need to get tested… he got tested. Everything de Blasio says is a three-day story. Day One: Thing happens. day Two: Mayor says something stupid, ruining credibility. Day Three: Mayor backtracks, becomes joke. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A conversation with Judd Apatow about his new film “The King of Staten Island.” (Molly Given for amNewYork Metro)