The Briefly for July 13, 2020 – The “A Summer Without Street Fairs” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Public libraries are opening, the first day without a Covid-19 death since March, the MTA looks for ideas, the NYPD steals streets, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 86˚
Clear throughout the day.

You’ll see some headlines that some areas of Queens are seeing a 58% or 68% positive rate for antibodies. While this seems like good news, having antibodies is no way to guarantee that you can’t get the infection again or even that you’ve had the infection in the past. The hope would be that neighborhoods may develop herd immunity. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The city has not built up herd immunity, which is the message from Jay Varna, the Senior Advisor for Public Health, NYC Mayor’s Office, and a vast majority of New Yorkers are still susceptible. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s ban on events means a summer without street fairs. This also includes Celebrate Brooklyn!, the Dominican Day Parade, San Gennaro, and the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

As you might expect, the Electric Zoo 2020 has been canceled. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Saturday was the first day since March 13 that no one was recorded as dying due to the coronavirus. Since March 23,283 were reported dead. (Nick Visser for HuffPost)

A look at the more difficult side of the Occupy City Hall, as the organizers have realized that their roles include caretakers for dozens of the city’s homeless that have taken to making their home in the occupation. (Alan Feuer, Juliana Kim and Byron Smith for NY Times)

Kudos to Sasha Baron Cohen, who hasn’t let the pandemic stop him from freaking out Rudy Giuliani so badly that he called the police. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

An overview of The Montefiore Family Resilience Fund, which supplies assistance for households that have lost a breadwinner or caregiver to Covid-19. The fund will assist 375 families. (Norwood News)

Officer Ernie Moran, an off-duty NYPD cop was arrested in Queens during the early hours Wednesday morning for harassing and stalking his ex-girlfriend. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Mayor de Blasio’s cuts to the NYPD included killing off the parking placard abuse unit, ensuring that he will do absolutely nothing as a mayor to end this form of low-level corruption from the NYPD. The mayor and the City Council have announced multiple initiatives to curb this type of corruption, but literally nothing has been done so far. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The NYPD has seized streets all across the city that are adjacent to station houses. Why? Don’t ask the mayor, who refuses to confront the NYPD on this theft of public space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Is the Staten Island Ferris wheel returning from the dead? The details haven’t been released, but it seems like a smaller version of the original idea might still have life. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Financial struggles brought on by the coronavirus pandemic will keep 15 Catholic schools across New York City closed for good. (Alex Mitchell and Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is turning to the public for ideas for how to keep trains and buses virus-free. Have any ideas? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the work of the Brooklyn Conviction Review Unit, whose job it is to correct hundreds of years of wrongful convictions in Brooklyn of Black and Latinx Brooklynites. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“We take responsibility for what happens in our stores—both on and off our sales floors—and we are committed to doing the work to improve how we treat our employees and customers.” Greenlight Bookstore co-owners Rebecca Fitting and Jessica Stockton-Bagnulo have made a public apology for creating an unwelcoming environment for Black customers and employees. (Brooklyn Reader)

15 New York City pools that will be reopening in August. (Jenna Fanelli for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s what a car-free, pedestrian-friendly NYC could look like., according to a plan from Architect Vishaan Chakrabarti and his firm Practice for Architecture and Urbanism. (Davin Gannon 6sqft)

Another look at the mass die-offs of fish in the Hudson river. A combination of sewage being dumped into the waters, lack of rain, and the heat are creating an extreme situation leading to the massive deaths of fish. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Wo Hop returns today for takeout orders. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Who isn’t filling out their census forms? It might be the rich. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Jose Barrera, a 50-year-old Brooklyn man was fatally run over in Borough Park while unloading his car outside his home on Saturday night. The driver was taken into custody, passed a DWI test, and was released without being charged Barrera is the 29th pedestrian to be killed by someone driving a car in 2020. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Video: Drone footage of NYC’s Black Lives Matter murals. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is suspended until July 19. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

22 public libraries in the city are reopening today. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

14 unique outdoor dining options. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 2, 2020 – The “Eating Outdoors in the New Eating Indoors” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The July 4th flyover, digging deeper into the budget, the building collapse in Carroll Gardens, mass transit returns to normal for July 4, and more

Today – Low: 76˚ High: 88˚
Clear throughout the day.

The MTA announced normal weekend service for July 4 to meet the expected demand for the city’s beaches on a combination of the first weekend with lifeguards and a holiday. (Robert Pozarycki for Bronx Times)

The Department of Defense announced a flyover of NYC on July 4 as part of the “2020 Salute to America.” Yes, definitely a year worth saluting. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

Video: Tuesday’s unannounced fireworks show was near the Statue of Liberty at 11 pm. At 11 pm, is there anything distinction between the Macy’s and illegal fireworks? (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Indoor dining is off the proverbial table for phase three, as expected. (Jesse McKinley and Luis Ferré-Sadurní for NY Times)

According to the NYC Hospitality Alliance, only one-fifth of bars and restaurants were able to pay their June bills on time. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork)

“Surely, some people will still insist on dining out anyway. Perhaps they’ve assessed that the chances of falling ill are acceptable, or that they’re ready to tough it out if they get sick. So allow me to recount what it’s actually like to catch COVID-19 — and I was one of the lucky ones.”
-Ryan Sutton for Eater, Why This Restaurant Critic Isn’t Dining Out Right Now

The argument for tipping 50% when dining outdoors. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

The NYC budget moves school safety officers from the NYPD’s budget to the Department of Educations budget, but it also imposes a hiring freeze on new teachers and reduces the number of school counselors. In the words of City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, this is “not a people victory.” (Annie Todd for Gothamist)

“Does it mean I’m less safe? Where do you take the billion dollars from? Does it mean I’m more safe? Does it have any effect on police abuse? I don’t know what it means.” Governor Cuomo encapsulates the entire conversation coming out of the NYC budget‘s shifting around of the NYPD budget, pointing out that the city has to “redesign the whole relationship” between the NYPD and its citizens. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Also included in the city’s budget is an 11% cut to cultural affairs, which includes after-school programs, funding for the Cultural Immigrant Initiative, the Coalition of Theaters of Color, the Bronx Children’s Museum, BAM’s arts instruction in schools, the city’s four zoos and aquarium, and more. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

The city’s budget cut the Fair Fares program by $65 million, which helps subsidize low-income New Yorkers’ mass transit, in a financial hit to low-income New Yorkers and the MTA. MTA Chairpowerson Pat Foye says congestion pricing is a virtual impossibility” thanks to the federal government and the pandemic. (Jose Martinez for The City)

It’s taken over three years, but the first street in the city’s Great Streets pilot program is complete. Atlantic Ave in East New York and Cypress Hills was rebuilt with updates to traffic safety, new curbs, water mains, trees, and fire hydrants, and more quality of life upgrades. (East New York News)

“I don’t know what the landlord can do and where the rent strike can take us. It’s frustrating. You’re sitting down with all these things, but you don’t know what to do; you don’t know where to turn and everywhere you turn it’s “Oh, your income is not enough.”” – Five stories from New Yorkers of what it’s like not paying rent. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

How do white people in a mostly white neighborhood stand up for BIPOC? Lessons learned on being an effective ally from a protest in Greenpoint. (Melissa Kravitz Joeffner for Greenpointers)

How much does it cost in the first year of dog companionship in NYC? According to a new study, the price of a new best friend is $3,823.05 for the first year and $2,351 for each subsequent year. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

2020’s most popular dog breed in the city is the Havanese according to the website Rover. I’m not sure this includes mutts, like my Scooter and Pepper. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

227 Duffield Street will be considered for landmark status. The address has been at the center of a preservationist fight for over a decade, as the house was associated with the abolitionist movement and a stop on the Underground Railroad. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Video: A look back in time at Harry Nugent, the city’s most beloved subway conductor. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

John Mullaly might be seen as the father of New York City parks, but he’s also credited for instigating the notorious Draft Riots of 1863 and for his racist views on Black people. That’s why activists are calling for removal of his name from Mullaly Park, a neighbor to Yankee Stadium and in a majority-minority neighborhood. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

After spending years as Mayor de Blasio’s mouthpieces, Press Secretary Freddi Goldstein and Communications Director Wiley Norvell are quitting. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

How did you celebrate Bobby Bonilla Day on July 1? If you are Bobby Bonilla, you were paid $1,193,248.20 by the Mets to not play for the Mets, just like you have been for nearly 20 years and like you will be through 2035. (Alex Mitchell for QNS)

A former Pret A Manger employee filed a lawsuit, alleging that its employees “created and fostered a discriminatory and hostile work environment” against her while she worked in several of the company’s NYC stores. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Info on Wednesday’s building collapse in Carroll Gardens. (Matthew Haag for NY Times)

New voter registrations were down 50% in NYC in 2020 compared to 2019, creating worries about the November elections and amplifying calls for online voter registration. (Christine Chung for The City)

Some Queens NYCHA residents have been living with no gas for cooking since before the pandemic started. (Clodagh McGowan for NY1)

Harlem’s Marcus Garvey, Jackie Robinson, and Wagner Houses pools will open on August 1. Across the city, 15 pools will open by August 1. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

11 outdoor bars, parklets, rooftops, and restaurants to chill out at this summer. (Meredith Craig de Pietro for Brooklyn Based)

Thanks to reader Victor for today’s featured photo from Domino Park

The Briefly for June 12, 2020 – The “Mr Mayor, Unlock This Playground” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The “blood in the streets” protest, the NYPD refuse to be interviewed online for the CCRB, a call to stop the Gowanus rezoning, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 83˚
Clear throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 58˚ High: 73˚

Has the pandemic and protests made you think about starting getting involved on a hyper-local level? Maybe you’ve thought about starting a neighborhood association? The Times breaks down how to do it. (Katherine Cusumano for NY Times)

Do you know the Muffin House? The Muffin House? The Muffin House. The roots of the nooks and crannies of Thomas’ English Muffins are in New York. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Governor Cuomo says that pools and playgrounds across the state can reopen. The city’s pools and playgrounds remain closed. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

In the 1970s, the NYPD’s unions distributed a flyer called “WELCOME TO FEAR CITY” meant to keep tourists out of New York City, teaching them how to survive with the city’s crime. A new version of “WELCOME TO FEAR CITY” has begun to be distributed, but with the twist of how to survive the police when protesting in New York. (Jeremiah Moss for Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

The City has created a searchable memorial of nearly 1,000 New York City victims of Covid-19. Right now it only covers a little over 4% of the city’s victims, but they are working with journalism schools to expand the memorials one person at a time. (The City)

Governor Cuomo is deciding to use the political capital he earned on defending statues of Christopher Columbus, saying Columbus represents Italian-American pride. This argument seems to pop up more and more often, making me think it’s not a matter of if but when the statue of Columbus in Columbus Circle is taken down. (Zack Fink for NY1)

People are calling for Police Seargeant Terri Napolitano to be fired for sharing a racist message on Facebook which showed President Obama being lynched with Hillary Clinton next in line for hanging. The Office of Court Administration suspended her for 30 days without pay, took away her gun, and launched an investigation. Napolitano has since deleted her social media accounts. (Jeanine Ramirez for NY1)

It shouldn’t be a surprise, but Manhattan’s rental vacancy rate is the highest it’s been in fourteen years. (Erin Hudson for The Real Deal)

“Unless people are interfering with a Barclays Center event, or there are safety concerns, we would not take action to have someone removed from our plaza.” Unfortunately, the NYPD has had a different opinion about how people should use the plaza outside the Barclays Center. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Report)

Jahmel Leach is a teenager who was tasered in the face by the NYPD. After the NYPD tasered and arrested the minor, they never notified his family he was in custody because he was tall and they thought he was an adult. The mayor says he’s “really troubled” by what happened to Leach but hasn’t vowed any specific actions he’s going to take to get answers. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

America has historically sought to arrest and prosecute its way through community issues that could be dealt with by understanding the history of this nation, our states & our community. Frustration comes from a lot of these things being ignored in impoverished communities: education, finances and health services. COVID-19 has exposed these inequities. So what will the city do beyond policing? We should build a comprehensive plan that addresses these shortfalls and provide the community with a say in how it defines the safety of its own neighborhoods.
– Taylonn Murphy Sr. for Gothamist, New York City Must Actually Invest In Black Communities—Right Now

How to celebrate Pride in quarantine. (Gabrielle Lenart for Brooklyn Based)

Phase one of reopening has begun, but there has been an uptick in Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations, which trails about two weeks behind New York City’s massive protests. We are still under the threshold for phase two. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Politicians in Queens are calling to make a 1.3 mile stretch of 34th Avenue in Jackson Heights permanently car-free. (Steven Vago for Streetsblog)

Render Stetson-Shanahan was found guilty of manslaughter for brutally killing Carolyn Bush, at their apartment on Sept. 28, 2016. He avoided murder charges by testifying that he had a mental lapse. (Christian Murray for Queens Post)

If you’ve wondered why there hasn’t been a leader to step up and speak for all of the city’s protesters, it because there isn’t one. The city isn’t being led by one voice, but by the voices of many. (Jan Ransom and Annie Correal for NY Times)

“The commissioner held a Twitter Q&A on Thursday morning, but took no questions.” Great job Commissioner Shea, great job. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

The award for most questionable headline and lead image combination goes to “Gay Pride embraces its roots by teaming up with U.S. black activists” by amNewYork Metro.

Congressmembers Max Rose and Yvette D. Clarke along with Mayor de Blasio ar asking the military to rename General Lee Avenue in Brooklyn’s Fort Hamilton army base. (Michael Gold for NY Times)

The city will spend $3 million to helping 100 restaurants in the city forced to close by the novel coronavirus pandemic subsidize paying 1,000 furloughed or fired workers at $20 per hour for at least six weeks and serve 53,000 free meals to people in communities hardest hit by the virus. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

A dumpling automat is opening in the East Village, confusingly named Brooklyn Dumpling Shop. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

The city will spend $3.65 million to give roughly 3,300 young people in paid 6 to 8-week online summer youth programs this year. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

As a resident of New York City, I am writing to demand that a moratorium be placed on proceeding with the Gowanus Rezone Proposal, which incorporates parts of Boerum Hill, Park Slope, and Carroll Gardens, until the city’s needs can be reassesed. In the wake of COVID-19, with both the city and state budgets in crisis, the economy in free fall, and as many as 20% of Americans having lost their jobs—including a disproportionate number of people of color— this plan is woefully out of step with what the city needs right now, or what it can afford.
– Voice of Gowanus, Demand a Moratorium on the Gowanus Rezone

The Alliance for Quality Education and The Dignity in Schools Campaign NY today denounced the mayor’s comments and refusal to remove NYPD officers from public schools. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

The Yankees are distributing $50,000 in scholarships among five different college-bound seniors, at $10,000 apiece, with one student coming from each borough through The Stonewall Scholars initiative. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Demonstrations and protests continue into week three as protesters spilled red paint to represent “blood in the streets” on Thursday, symbolizing “the blood militant forces such as the police cause black people to shed.” It created a powerful image. (Debora Fougere for NY1)

How to calculate how much rent you can afford right now. (Localize.City)

1,109 Civilian Complaint Review Board investigations are awaiting police officer interviews, but the police union will not allow officers to be interviewed online. What bullshit. (Eileen Grench for The City)

Where to get a restaurant-made picnic spread in the city. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Thanks to reader Jenny for today’s featured photo!