The Briefly for June 4, 2019 – The “If 311 Doesn’t Work, Try A Lawsuit” Edition

the G train lentil soup experiment, sex work is at the center of the Queens DA race, Gov Ball organizers apologize, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Missed this yesterday, but the advice for the subway after 10pm this week is “maybe not.” Service changes will be disrupting nearly every line somewhere. (6sqft)

The organizers of Governors Ball are attempting to stave off the Fyre Festival comparisons with a “transparent” backstory to what the hell happened with Sunday’s cancelations that led to people being stuck on Randall’s Island. (BrooklynVegan)

RIP “Service Changes.” Hello “Train Rerouted,” “Express to Local,” and “Multiple Impacts.” (Gothamist)

The city is already more annoying than last year, and the 311 noise complaints are proof, but here’s an interesting alternative. After complaints went nowhere, Mike Edison threatened to sue in small claims court, and it’s been working. (NY Times)

The Newtown Creek nature walk, which is really quite pleasant but has an air of being unfinished, is being expanded by the Department of Environmental Protection and connected to the eastern side of Whale Creek. (Curbed)

Inside Cowboy Technical Services, a recording studio celebrating twenty years in the city. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Hundreds of students staged an hourslong sit-in at LaGuardia High School to protest a perceived dilution of LaGuardia’s arts focus in favor of stricter academic requirements. (NY Times)

Sex work is shaping this year’s Queens DA election, with candidates trying to thread the needle of decriminalizing sex work while also eradicating the forced sex work and trafficking industry. (amNY)

If you’re wandering in Central Park looking for something new, try to find the somewhat hidden sundial that’s just inside Inventor’s Gate at East 72nd Street. When you’re there, snag a photo and tag @TheBrieflyNYC on Instagram (Ephemeral New York)

An ice cream parlor for dogs? Yes, it’s in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

OMNY is on its way into the hearts of New Yorkers. The first full weekend of its rollout saw 6,100 taps, which isn’t bad for only being available at 16 stations and on Staten Island buses. (amNY)

The World Trade Center is still unfinished. The Port Authority and Lower Manhattan Development Corporation reached a deal to move forward with a request for proposals for 5 World Trade Center, the last piece of land. With 18 years on, construction may never be finished. (Curbed)

Staten Island’s 11 oldest buildings. (Untapped Cities)

It’s been a year since the mayor called for changes to the city’s specialized high school admissions exams. What’s changed? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Raines sandwich, “an old desiccated ruin of dust-laden bread and mummified ham or cheese,” has its roots in New York’s very odd pre-prohibition drinking laws. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC’s poverty rate is down, but nearly one in five New Yorkers are still technically poor. (Patch)

Poor Jake Dobkin, whose experience with Revel, the city’s newest alternative transportation kid on the block which offers mopeds by the minute, was not ideal. Hey Jake, I’ve been waiting for my account to be approved since Saturday, so you should feel lucky you were even able to sign up! (Gothamist)

Thomas Keller and his restaurants Per Se and the French Laundry go to trial today for a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit, where they are being sued for $5 million for allegedly pushing out a staffer after she became pregnant. (Eater)

Here’s what you need to know about the Puerto Rican Day Parade this Sunday. (Curbed)

The NYC holy grail: 1-bedrooms under $1,500. (StreetEasy)

Especially considering that one-bedroom rents are at an all-time high of $2,980/month. (Curbed)

The Williamsburg “Link” buses meant to divert people from the L train to alternatives were cut from the city’s bus lineup due to a lack of use. In their place will the new B91 and B92 routes. (Gothamist)

At the last moment, the mayor is showing his support for rent control laws and marijuana legalization on a state-wide level. The legislative session ends on June 19, and at the moment neither proposal is a sure thing. (amNY)

Inside the great G train lentil soup experiment. (Gothamist)

Lyme Disease rates are down in the city for the first time in five years. Everyone wear your knee-length socks all summer! (Patch)

The 7 train tracks continue to fall apart, dropping debris on the streets below. This week it was Roosevelt Ave near 53rd St that received a free souvenir from the MTA. A reminder that the MTA feels that netting isn’t necessary to protect people from its literally crumbling infrastructure. (Jackson Heights Post)

14 essential BBQ restaurants. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for May 24, 2019 – The “Human Rights Violations by the MTA” Edition

How to get around and what to eat and drink Memorial Day weekend, the ACC is looking for people to hang out with dogs, commuting from the suburbs sucks, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Everything you need to know about getting around in NYC during Memorial Day weekend, including all of the normal weekend disruptions that bleed through to Monday. (6sqft)

If you love dogs but can’t have one in your apartment, here’s a compromise. The city’s Animal Care Centers is looking for people who take a shelter dog out for some fun for a few hours. Go to the park to play, go for a long walk with your new best friend, go for a car ride, or a dog-friendly restaurant, it doesn’t matter. Give one of these dogs a break from shelter life. It’s all part of the “BoroughBreak” program, which starts up this weekend. (amNY)

This is the jackass pulling the emergency brakes on the subways. (amNY)

The MTA is on the verge of a state human rights violation by constantly failing to install elevators. In the words of the judge “There has to be action, no more talk.” (Gothamist)

A Brooklyn Community Board bought a $26k SUV, which just so happened to have its own parking space across the street from the board’s manager Gerald Esposito. Why did they buy it? “To go different places.” (The City)

Your guide to the food at Rockaway Beach. (Gothamist)

The Queens Zoo has two new fluffy babies in Brienne and Benny, a pair of Andean bears. (amNY)

What makes you a regular? Weekly visits? A drink named after you? “The usual?” (NY Times)

Cellino & Barnes, the comedy, is coming to Park Slope. (Viewing NYC)

“When one attorney refused to acquiesce, respondent Barnes called him a ‘f—ing coward and vowed that respondent Barnes ‘will remember this.” Here’s a history on the infamous breakup of two NYC famous lawyers. (The Cut)

The Port Authority is drowning in people and buses and something has to change. (Curbed)

If you’re flying out of Newark this weekend, sorry to hear it, but here’s a list of where to eat in EWK. (Eater)

It’s Memorial Day weekend. Let’s start worrying about hurricanes. (Patch)

The 7 train has been literally falling apart, but the MTA doesn’t think that danger is enough to put netting under the platforms to protect the cars below. (The City)

The city’s libraries need about $35 million in additional funding, but they received an $11 million cut from Mayor de Blasio. This is poor timing because the libraries are expected to play a big part in the 2020 census, which the mayor claims to be a priority. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Welcome to the Mr. Jones Supper Club, the city’s most exclusive dining experience. (Great Big Story)

Over a quarter million people move out of the city every year and move to the suburbs, where they find that their commutes still suck. (Gothamist)

Corey Johnson has put a bill forward that is a ten-year roadmap to breaking the city’s car culture. (Curbed)

Penn Station, the city’s festering exit wound,” sucks, but here are a few tips to make it a slightly less nightmarish hellscape. (Gothamist)

The state’s legislature says it’s time to end the state’s ban on “gravity” knives. The governor has vetoed similar bills twice, but with evidence that the law is selectively enforced against people of color and a recent judge called it “unconstitutional,” he may sign it into law this time. (Patch)

Here’s news you don’t want to hear. Some of the city’s water fountains contain up to 50x the federally allowed amount of lead. 4.5% of early tests came back positive for lead. The entire city is scheduled to be tested by June 14. (Gothamist)

Diners have been an important part of the city for decades, but real estate developers and rising costs of rent have been poisoning diner culture and they’re in danger of disappearing. (NY Times)

The Bowery Mural Wall is ready to turn over, but not without someone tagging the white wall first. (Bowery Boogie)

Hervey Weinstein, a real-world Cloverfield-style monster, tentatively reached a $44 million settlement to resolve the lawsuits against him. (NY Times)

The MTA’s Inspector General will be the sacrificial goat when it comes to the overtime scandal. Governor Cuomo is set to replace 12-year IG Barry Kluger with the governor’s Special Council for Public Integrity Carolyn Pokorny. Gothamist)

Who can you blame for your allergies? Men! Well, kinda. (Atlas Obscura)

Food and drink recommendations on Memorial Day from Grub Street. (Should be obvious this is from Grub Street)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for May 22, 2019 – The “A Carmel Frappuccino with Two Pumps of Pesticide Please” Edition

New York state closes in on the president, Fleet Week starts, a beloved ice cream shop is getting pushed out, where to eat outside, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Every subway stop’s median rent mapped. (/r/NYC)

Beyond The Streets” is bringing the work of 150 street artists to Williamsburg this summer. (Time Out)

Turns out Starbucks might have been using an industrial pesticide in an attempt to hide its unsanitary convictions. Which Starbucks? According to a new class-action lawsuit, it’s all of them in the city. (Gothamist)

The sky is falling, but this time it’s not the ceiling on the subways. A tourist is in critical, but stable, condition after a branch from a sickly tree in Washington Square Park fell on her. (Gothamist)

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. A minority-owned, beloved and long-standing shop in a rapidly gentrifying neighborhood is being forced to close. Scoops in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens is in the process of being evicted by its landlord after being in the neighborhood since 1984. (Bklyner)

Where to eat near the Javits Center (if you must). (Eater)

Naked Shakespeare in Prospect Park, just like the Bard intended it to be performed. (Time Out)

You’d think that after paying $53,000 a year to attend NYU you’d be able to easily get tickets to graduation. You’d be wrong. Tickets are going on the secondary market for hundreds of dollars. (Gothamist)

The Brooklyn Botanical Gardens is giving you an opportunity to listen to plants without having to drop acid. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The absolute worst time to leave for Memorial Day weekend will be between 4:45 and 6:45pm on Thursday, but delays will start today. (Curbed)

Your 2019 guide to city beaches. (Gothamist)

The goats who will landscape Riverside Park started their summer jobs and the photos are delightful. (Untapped Cities)

Today starts Fleet Week. Here’s what you need to know. (Patch)

The Port Authority wants your input to improve the Bus Terminal. No, you can’t say “burn it down.” (Curbed)

Ska is dead. The proof. “I love ska.” -Mayor de Blasio. (BrooklynVegan)

You have a few days to say farewell to the city’s only California Pizza Kitchen before it closes on Friday. (Eater)

There are more people in Manhattan than North and South Dakota, combined! (Viewing NYC)

David Byrne is trying to rally the mayor to restore a $59 million funding cut for cultural programs in this year’s budget. (Patch)

A great white shark continues to prowl near the city’s waters, but you can safely swim in the Long Island Sound. (NY Times)

The Daniel Pantaleo trial over the death of Eric Garner continues with multiple delays. After three hours this week, the case is taking a two-week hiatus. (Gothamist)

New York state is closing in on President Trump. A new bill will allow state prosecutors to pursue anyone granted a presidential pardon and the next up is a bill that will allow the state to release the president’s state tax returns to Congress. (NY Times)

As sea levels continue to rise, the city’s largest threat is literally all around us. (New York City News Service)

Don’t pull the emergency brakes on the subway if you’re not at a station. (NY Times)

City Council Member Helen Rosenthal is planning to introduce legislation that would create an Office on Sexual Harassment Prevention inside the mayor’s office. There was a 1993 executive order from Mayor Dinkins, but it was never put into effect. (Gotham Gazette)

77 places to eat outside. (The Infatuation)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.