The Briefly for January 22, 2020 – The “Rich New Yorkers Are Not Leaving” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: NYC temporarily closes vaccination sites, the Port Authority could get a renovation, the Hunts Point Produce Market strike, and more

Today – Low: 28˚ High: 41˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.
This weekend – Low: 22˚ High: 34˚

Mayor de Blasio closed all 15 of the city’s vaccination hubs due to a delay in vaccination shipments of the Moderna vaccine from Washington. The city’s 15 vaccination hubs will reopen when “supplies pick up.” Appointments for people receiving their second shot will be rescheduled, but it’s best to contact the city’s vaccine hotline at 877-VAX-4NYC if you don’t hear anything soon. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

23,000 vaccination appoints have already been rescheduled. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

It’s not just the city, the state is running low on vaccines too. At the current rate of 250k shipped vaccine doses weekly, it will take seven months to vaccinate New Yorkers that are currently eligible. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

A Covid-19 home test vending machine will be coming to W 34th St on Tuesday the 26th inside the new Wellness 4 Humanity store. Tests will cost $119. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Governor Cuomo is asking the federal government for $15 billion in aid or he’ll be cored to raise taxes on the state’s rich, which he thinks will scare them off. Hey dummy, do both. The rich aren’t going anywhere. (Greg David for The City)

Rents for the biggest and most expensive apartments in Manhattan rose by double-digit percentages in December. It’s time to end the charade that the rich are somehow abandoning New York City. (Jeff Andrews for Curbed)

How desperate is the state for money? Lobbying has begun to try to build casinos in Manhattan. (Dana Rubinstein and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

The Port Authority in Manhattan may get a $10 billion overhaul. It would take at least a decade to complete and it would be partially financed by selling the air rights to a commercial tower on top of the terminal and nearby buildings. (Patrick McGeehan and Winnie Hu for NY Times)

The Astoria Mutual Aid Network is raising money so their neighbors in public housing don’t have to live without heat in the winter. For those looking to help, you can still donate. (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Interview: Joe Lentol reflects on his over forty years of public service as Assemblymember from the state’s 50th district in Greenpoint after being ousted by Emily Gallagher. (Julia Kott for Greenpointers)

Rendering: No one will accuse 555 Broadway in Brooklyn of looking boring, but it does look like someone is about to lose a game of Jenga. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY)

Mets General Manager Jared Porter was fired for sending lewd and explicit text messages to a female reporter in 2016. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Rough Trade NYC is closing their Williamsburg store in order to relocate. They’ve also cut ties with Bowery Presents, who will not be a part of the new location. They have not announced a new location yet, but hope to be open by summer. Their website will remain open in the meantime. (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Jimmy Van Bramer, the thwarter of Amazon’s HQ2 plans, announced he will run for Queens borough president. (Christina Santucci for Queens Post)

Former southern Brooklyn and Staten Island Congressman Max Rose will serve as a senior advisor on Covid-19 in the Pentagon. While serving in Afghanistan, Rose earned a Purple Heart. (Rose Adams for Brooklyn Paper)

Watch Republican Staten Island Congressmember Nicole Malliotakis get pushed around on CNN and called out on her shit after opposing the 2020 election results and calling for unity immediately afterward. (Erin Burnett Out Front on CNN)

The Manhattan District Attorney Democratic Primary is in June and current DA Cy Vance has raised $4,000 to date. Call me crazy, but it doesn’t seem like he’s running again, even if he hasn’t made any announcements. (Josefa Velasquez and Rachel Holliday Smith)

James Dolan, New York City’s worst songwriter, CEO of Madison Square Garden Entertainment Corp, and owner of the Knicks and Rangers, started a new political expenditure committee “The Coalition to Restore New York.” Dolan will likely support anyone for mayor that won’t end MSG’s 38-year real estate tax break. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

7 forgotten subway entrances. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Long Island City’s Trump Countdown Clock has finally hit zero. (LICtalk)

NYC’s most anticipated restaurant openings of spring 2021. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

The Bushwick Bar Babes of 2021 calendar is now available. All the charm of Bushwick’s best bars with none of the smell. I miss making jokes about Bushwick. (Matt Fink for Bushwick Daily)

AOC was not at the Inauguration Day in DC because she was backing the workers’ strike at the Hunts Point Produce Market in the Bronx, where 60% of the city’s produce is handled. Workers are striking for a $1/hour raise. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A rundown of what’s going on at the Hunts Point Produce Market. (Rachel Sugar for Eater)

Success Academy, New York City’s largest charter network, will remain fully virtual for the rest of the school year. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The alleged serial killer in a Brownsville NYCHA complex was arrested on Thursday. His alleged victims were three elderly women all 78 or older. (NY1)

The New York state lawsuit that seeks to dissolve the NRA will be allowed forward. The NRA had attempted to move the lawsuit to federal court. You might say that Attorney General Letitia James has the NRA in her sights. *groan* (Brooklyn Eagle)

Mayor Bill de Blasio has a new idea for disciplining the NYPD – a promise to fire NYPD cops who use illegal chokeholds. What an innovative idea that the mayor could have had at any moment between the 2014 killing of Eric Garner and today. (Rosa Goldensohn for The City)

A new class-action lawsuit accuses the NYPD of violating the rights of New Yorkers through “demoralizing and brutal shows of force, rather than genuine efforts to facilitate protesters’ protected First Amendment activity” and is seeking monetary damages for those who were brutalized and arrested during demonstrations. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The NYPD will serve disciplinary charges against Officer Wayne Isaacs, who used his service weapon to shoot and kill Delrawn Small, an unarmed Black man, following an apparent driving dispute in Brooklyn in 2016. (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

The State Legislature is finally poised to repeal the state’s discriminatory ban on “Walking While Trans” in the coming weeks. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

Podcast: Congrats to Untapped New York for the launch of their new Secrets of New York podcast. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Manhattan pickup artist Samuel Fisher encouraged people to bring guns to DC leading up to the insurrection at the Capitol, saying “they can’t arrest us all man.” He was arrested on Wednesday. You might say the pickup artist was “picked up” by the FBI. *groan* (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

U.S. Army soldier Cole James Bridges was arrested Tuesday for trying to assist ISIS by plotting to kill fellow soldiers in the Middle East and providing advice on potential terrorist targets in New York, including the 9/11 Memorial, according to the Department of Justice. (Matt Katz for Gothamist)

Brendan Hunt, who also went by the handle “X-Ray Ultra,” was arrested by the FBI in Queens for allegedly threatening to murder or incite others to murder members of Congress, specifically AOC and Chuck Schumer. He was suspended without pay by the New York State Office of Court Administration where he works full-time. (Jonathan Dienst, Marc Santia and Joe Valiquette for NBC New York)

Five picks from Time Out on what to stream if you’re missing New York City. I would have put the 1990 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on the list, but that’s just my pick. (Christina Izzo for Time Out)

A first look at the Brooklyn Dumpling Shop’s Automat. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

Quickly, take a look at the Bernie meme in various NYC locations before it stops being amusing. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The Briefly for August 3, 2020 – The “Fired Anywhere But New York City” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor’s staff keeps quitting, 15 new Open Restaurant streets, AOC weighs in on the Port Authority’s federal funding, a whale saved, and more

Today – Low: 75˚ High: 88˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Tuesday is looking rough in the city. Tropical Storm Isaias is predicted to hit the city sometime Tuesday afternoon. Just in time for my dogs to need a walk. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

“I’m telling you we’re going to have an issue.” Governor Cuomo isn’t an optimist when it comes to the city’s economic recovery. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Katz’s launched its own delivery service. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The mayor has been suspending alternate side parking on and off for months and he was never aware that the city uses street cleaning days for bike lane work. Good thing the mayor spent all that effort to “lighten the burden” of car ownership, in his own words. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The mayor is doing such a great job serving the city that six high-ranking staffers of Mayor de Blasio’s have quit in the last month. As everyone knows, there’s no better time to leave your government job than during an economic crisis in the middle of a pandemic for a mayor who will be out of office in less than two years. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Calls for NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea to resign have grown louder in the past few weeks. The pandemic and protests following the murder of George Floyd have shown that the NYPD’s commissioner has the back of the citizens of the NYPD and not the citizens of NYC and has exacerbated problems between the two. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

It’s hard to imagine another city where the commissioner, who is appointed by and serves at the pleasure of the mayor, would keep their job in the face of everything that Dermot Shea has said and done, but most cities aren’t governed by the coward Bill de Blasio. Sometimes I editorialize in these moments, but this piece in the Times looks at just how weird it is that Shea has kept his job despite almost a decade of de Blasio calling for police reforms. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Following Andrew Coté, who spent his pandemic rescuing beehives across the city. (Stephanie Simon)

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was hit with a $777 million drop in revenues in the first half of the year and is pleading for federal assistance, potentially losing $3 billion by March 2022. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

“While some of this funding may be critical to stabilize Port Authority operations, no funding should be provided to the AirTrain; the AirTrain is an unnecessary boondoggle that will hamper economic recovery in our watershed, a region in Northern Queens that has been heavily impacted by Covid-19,” -AOC (Angélica Acevedo for QNS)

You might have done everything right when it came to your absentee ballot and the Board of Elections still may have invalidated it. In a misunderstanding between the state and the post office, it’s possible the post office didn’t postmark your ballot and it also didn’t deliver it before the June 30 deadline. The exact number of rejected ballots will be announced on Tuesday. (Emily Ngo for NY1)

Even if we admit that everyone who touched the ballots (except voters) was at fault, what are the next steps? We’re expecting a ruling this week in a court case that will decide the fate of many of these invalidated votes. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

One of the things that sucks the most about the voting mess from the June 23 primary is that the city is now being held up by President Trashbag as a reason to not move forward with mail-in voting. There was no malfeasance involved, but the state and the federal government let us down with a failure to perform in June and we don’t have much time before November roars through. (Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

It has taken the city an embarrassingly long amount of time to create the No-Penalty Business Accessory Sign Inspection program in reaction to the panic going around small businesses after hundreds of complaints were filed in November of 2018, leading to many businesses just ripping their signs down in confusion/fear. It shouldn’t take a deadly pandemic for the city to help small businesses become compliant with regulations. (Jaime DeJesus for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The Top of the Rock will reopen this Thursday with free admission to essential workers and a guest from August 14-16. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

American Museum of Natural History is reopening on Sept. 9, pending permission from state and city officials, with a 25% capacity. (Sarah Bahr for NY Times)

Ronny Vargas and Alex Sauzo were arrested for throwing an illegal and non-socially distanced three-hour boat party in the East River with 17u2 people aboard. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

A humpback whale was successfully freed by NOAA over the weekend after being entangled in a mess of buoys and fishing line for several days. Humpback whales returning to NYC’s waterways is a positive sign that preservation efforts are working, but also a sign that we’ll need to continue those efforts to keep them safe. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Photos: If you don’t have an easy means to see it yourself, there is a tribute to Elijah McClain by artist Vincent Ballentine in the First Street Green Art Park. (EV Grieve)

3% is the city’s threshold for keeping the schools open. As long as the city’s seven-day rolling average positivity rate stays below 3%, schools will stay open. The rate has been between 1% and 2% for about two months. The city will no mandate that staff or students get tested for Covid-19. The chair of the City Council’s education committee calls the city’s plans “an unfunded proposal that is incomplete.” The head of the teacher’s union says “This is not enough to protect students and staff.” (Elizabeth Kim and David Cruz for Gothamist)

15 more streets were added to the city’s Open Restaurants program, which allows restaurants to expand into the streets on the weekend. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

NYPD officer Kevin Martin was arrested and charged with evidence tampering and official misconduct. Martin has been the subject of 14 investigations by the Civilian Complaint Review Board and 18 of the 45 different allegations brought against him have been substantiated and he was named in six lawsuits, which cost the city over $1 million in settlements. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Good morning to Murphy, the newborn harbor seal pup in the New York Aquarium in Coney Island. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

Photos: The MTA is trying out six new kinds of subway maps. If you want to see them in person, take the R all the way to 86th St in Brooklyn, or just look at the photos. (Ben Yakas, photos by Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

17 public art installations not to miss in August, including the new installation in the Socrates Sculpture Park. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

An airport replacing Central Park? Is this some sort of joke? Yes, it is. (Josh Vogel for NYC Urbanism)

11 food and drink pop-ups in NYC this summer. Happy to see Bad Trip on the list in Dumbo, it’s my favorite of this summer’s picks. (Hannah Albertine & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for January 9, 2020 – The “300 Defective Subway Cars and State of the State” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Legal weed, 12 bloody hours for pedestrians, the OMNY system is stealing fares, rent in Williamsburg hits an all-time high, the best bagels, and more

Today – Low: 32˚ High: 34˚
Clear throughout the day.

Video: Watch the full State of the State Address. (NYGovCuomo on YouTube)

An overview of homeless funding, small business tax cuts, a “Restore Mother Nature” bond, and other proposals that could come from the speech. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

With the state legislature being in firm control of Democrats in 2019 and making real progress on Cuomo’s agenda, the governor was forced to find new material for this year’s speech. (Politico)

The state failed to legalize weed in the summer of 2019, could 2020 be the year? The governor called it an ethical imperative to legalize it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

During the speech, Cuomo called for labeling certain hate crimes as domestic terrorism, which is punishable by life in prison. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The governor is calling to end the “fraud” of the gig economy, comparing gig economy corporations to sweatshops and legislation could re-classify independent contractors as employees, similar to the recently passed (and challenged) California law. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

The Restore Mother Nature Bond Act, mentioned in the speech, would pump $3 billion into resiliency efforts across the state, city included. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Governor Cuomo vetoed a bill that independent pharmacists said would protect them and patients against health care middlemen causing higher fees. The governor cited higher fees and anti-competition concerns in his message. (Gabe Herman for The Villager)

Governor Cuomo wants to ban repeat sex offenders from the subway. How? No one has an answer to that question and this is the second year in a row he’s expressed that desire. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The MTA pulled nearly 300 brand new-but-faulty subway cars from their tracks overnight on Tuesday for “repeated issues.” The cars represent 4.5% of the MTA’s fleet. These are the same cars that the MTA paid $600 million for and only received 18 on time and have since cost the city $35 million in repairs and $300 million in lost labor. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The OMNY system celebrated its 5 millionth payment, but there’s more to this story. It seems that some scanners have been double charging unwitting riders. As riders scan their MetroCards, the sensitive scanners pick up the near field signal and also charge their credit cards. In order to fix this on an iPhone, disable “Express Transit Card” in your Wallet and Apple Pay settings. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

In a very MTA moment, someone managed to jump a turnstile in the middle of an OMNY press conference. (Bowery Boogie)

The MTA is being sued by Surveillance Technology Oversight Project (yeah, it spells STOP) to get information about a camera in the Times Square station installed to deter fare evasion. STOP believes the MTA is deploying facial recognition technology, but the MTA denies any facial recognition. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

46% of families living below the poverty line do not have broadband internet access as home. To alleviate this, the mayor announced an Internet Master Plan. It’s low on details, but the idea is the city will partner with private providers to expand the current infrastructure. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

The LaGuardia AirTrain situation is a complete mess. If the AirTrain moves forward, it will be Governor Cuomo’s sheer force of will, and not what is the best actual option. (Benjamin Kabak for Second Ave Sagas)

Ever sine the L train shutdown was shutdown, rent in Williamsburg started creeping up and are now 26.7% higher and have hit an all-time high of $3,675/month. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

The city witnessed a 12 bloody hours as four pedestrians were killed or critically injured. A man was killed but he driver of a bus in Midtown, a 10-year-old boy and his mother were hit by a garbage truck and the boy was killed by the driver, and a 68-year-old woman was killed by the driver of a cement truck in Borough Park. 122 pedestrians were killed in 2019, up from 105 in 2018. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

Mulchfest continues through January 11, so bring your Christmas trees to one of the 67 drop-off sites across the city to participate. (Gabe Herman for The Villager)

The best momo (Himalayan dumplings) in the city, ranked. (Joe DiStefano for Grub Street)

Phots: The vintage typewriters of the closed to the public Bankers Club on the 40th floor of the Equitable Building. (Michelle Young for Untaped New York)

2019 seemed like the year for Universal Healthcare in New York state. What happened? (Ross Barkan for Gothamist)

Stop buying books on Amazon and borrow them from the library. An arduous task, I know. Use Library Extension to make it easier, the Chrome and Firefox extension will tell you what books and audiobooks are available at the nearest libraries to you. Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Book Culture, the beloved book shop on the Upper West Side, suddenly closed due to owed rent payments. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Here’s a different kind of “world’s tallest.” The 707-foot tall 270 Park Ave is about to become the tallest building to be intentionally razed. chase has decided it wants a 70-story building there instead, nearly twice the height of the old building. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Renderings: See inside Peak, the 101st-floor restaurant coming to Hudson Yards. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Another food hall is opening in Midtown. Take a look at the 12,000 square foot Urbanspace, which will include Roberta’s Pizza, LoLo’s, Call Me Pasta, City Tamale, an Eisenberg’s sandwich shop, and more. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Brooklyn Public Library’s Sheepshead Bay branch reopened Tuesday after a five-month closure. (Jessica Parks for Brooklyn Paper)

Is the city’s healthiest neighborhood Midtown? (Emily Davenport for amNewYork)

Meet Dena Cooper, the artist transforming Alexander Jackson into Harriet Tubman on $20 bills. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

A look at The Duplex, the city’s longest running cabaret bar. (Dawson Knick for GVSHP)

The finest bagels of NYC, mapped. (Eater)

How the city’s bagel union fought off a mafia takeover. (Jason Turbow for Grub Street)