The Briefly for October 3, 2019 – The “Really Screwed by the Hudson Yards” Edition

The 14th Street busway begins today, NYC schools ban bacon, RIP Ming the tiger, the East River Park renovation plans changed, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

New York Comic Con starts today, so get ready for the subways to get more weird and awesome through Sunday. (amNY)

Say goodbye to bologna, salami, pepperoni, or bacon in city schools as they have banned all processed meats. (Grub Street)

If you think you understand the challenges of driving a city bus, see the world through their eyes. (amNY)

These are the Forever 21 stores expected to close in NYC. (Patch)

If you’ve felt screwed by the Hudson Yards, now you can make it a reality. Wolfgang & Hite has released a series of sex toys shaped like the buildings in the Hudson Yards. Yes, there’s a Vessel, and yes, it’s a butt-plug. (Curbed)

Today is the first day of the 14th St busway. Let’s find out if this makes the buses of 14th St any more tenable. (amNY)

New York state is on track to meet its goals to end the AIDS epidemic in the state by 2020. (NY Times)

The Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade is safe for 2019, thanks to the Heart of Chelsea Veterinary Group’s sponsorship. Let’s all look forward to seeing all those adorable pups in their cute outfits! (Bedford + Bowery)

Where did all those pedal-assisted Citi Bikes go? (Gothamist)

Staten Island Democratic Congressperson Max Rose has announced that he supports the impeachment inquiry, ending a week-long moment of indecision. (Politico)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced her opposition to Mayor de Blasio’s Riker’s Island community jail replacement program. (Politico)

It’s hard not to see the Greater New York Hospital Association’s donations of a million dollars the New York State’s Democratic Party and a Medicaid reimbursement increase of $140 million as quid pro quo. (NY Times)

The mayor wants to take credit for the decline in poverty in the city, but the truth isn’t as easy as he wants to believe it is. (Politico)

14 chefs give their opinion on where to eat on a day off. (Grub Street)

What if instead of spending on police preventing fare evasion, more money was spent on subsidizing low-income New Yorkers’ subway rides? (Gothamist)

Kevin Dennard hit and killed a homeless man who went by “Pops” with his car on Tuesday morning. Dennard has two previous convictions for drunk driving and admitted he had a few beers before hitting and killing Pops. Pops was the 83rd pedestrian to be killed by drivers this year. (Gothamist)

For those of you who love apartment-porn, here’s a $12.5 million townhouse with a 40-foot pool, a terrace, and a two-car garage on the Upper East Side. (6sqft)

Seeing sukkahs in Williamsburg around the time of the Jewish holiday Sukkot isn’t strange, but seeing them built in the middle of the street is very out of the ordinary. (Streetsblog)

A woman committed suicide by subway in Bensonhurst on Tuesday morning at Bay Parkway and 86th Street. Due to the elevated tracks, the FDNY was involved in washing down the street below. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

RIP James Robinson, who saw a gap in ambulance coverage in Bed-Stuy in the 80s and filled the gap with his own volunteer service. (NY Times)

The plans for renovations at East River Park as part of the East Side Coastal Resiliency project have changed and the park will not close completely for three years in favor of slower work that will only require portions of the park to close at any moment. (Gothamist)

A deep look at Rafael Espinal Jr’s story from an English Language instructor for a GED program to City Council to a run at the Brooklyn Borough President’s office. (Kings County Politics)

Home prices are skyrocketing near these five subway stops. Four in Manhattan, one in the Bronx. (Patch)

Did you know America’s oldest public golf course is in the Bronx? (Welcome2TheBronx)

Schneps Media is buying amNY from Newsday. This won’t change my inclusion of their stories in The Briefly, but as Schneps Media continues to buy local news outlets, we will continue to lose what made those publications unique. Schneps owns amNY, QNS.com, the Brooklyn Paper, Brownstoner, Gay City News, Carribean Life, El Correo NY, Bronx Weekly, The Villager, Chelsea Now, Manhattan Express and over a dozen smaller neighborhood-focused outlets. 33 newspapers, 28 magazines, and 20 websites. Media consolidation of this nature is not healthy for the city. There has been no announcement that newsroom jobs are safe, as was made in the New York Magazine and Vox merger.

Now you can read the same stories on even more websites. (Brooklyn Paper, amNY, The Villager, and QNS.com)

Finally, the MTA will install netting underneath the raised subway tracks in Queens that seem to be regularly falling apart as part of the $51.5 billion MTA Capital Plan. (QNS.com)

Ming, the 400-pound tiger who lived in a Harlem housing project and discovered in 2003, has died at the age of nineteen. (NY Times)

The best places in Central Park to see fall foliage. (6sqft)

The Briefly for October 2, 2019 – The “Hamlet VIII is the City’s Fanciest Kitty” Edition

Welcome to Zombie Summer, we are all subsidizing wealthy New Yorkers’ ferry commutes, Peter Luger’s burger is no longer the king, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Welcome to Zombie Summer. (Gothamist)

The Peter Luger’s burger is regularly considered the best burger in the city, but it seems you have one less reason to go to Williamsburg, because there may be a new king in the Red Hook Tavern’s cheeseburger. Long live the king. (Eater)

NYC Ferries were, according to the mayor, supposed to connect disconnected neighborhoods and be one of many transit options for all New Yorkers, but it turns out that more than 60% of heavily subsidized riders are white and earn over $75,000 a year. (6sqft)

The most diverse line is the Soundview line, which connects the Bronx to Lower Manhattan. (Welcome2TheBronx)

Meet Hamlet VIII, the fanciest cat in New York City. (Time Out)

Say hello to the startups trying to disrupt the apartment security deposit. (NY Times)

There’s a new deli in Rockefeller Center, but nothing in this deli is edible. Delicatessen on 6th is an installation from artist Lucy Sparrow where everything is made of felt. (Untapped Cities)

14 new public art installations in October. (Untapped Cities)

Here comes the talk about an East coast hyperloop from NYC to Washington DC. (6sqft)

One of the most memorable sandwiches in New York City is the cresia sandwich at Cremini’s in Carroll Gardens, according to Robert Sietsema. (Eater)

Gothamist is hiring a news editor. (Gothamist)

TJ Atoms is portraying ODB, one of rap’s icons in Hulu’s ‘Wu-Tang Clan,’ no pressure, right? (amNY)

How vulnerable is Max Rose, the centrist Democrat who represents Staten Island and parts of South Brooklyn in the House of Representatives? (Gotham Gazette)

Lower Manhattan is considering its defenses against its greatest enemy: the sea. The city is considering extending the shoreline of Battery Park City and the Financial District by about 500 feet to combat the effects of climate change. (Curbed)

The city’s poverty rate is at a recent historic low, which is measured at a household with two adults and two children at $32,402. Despite this, the rate of inequality in the city remains exactly the same as when Mayor de Blasio first took office. (Gothamist)

State senators are calling for a more transparent investigation into National Grid for denying gas to thousands of new and existing customers in retaliation for not approving a new gas pipeline. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Giuliani-era law that attempted to zone strip clubs and sex shops out of existence is still being litigated, with U.S. District Judge William Pauley ruling in favor of adult establishments, citing how the city has changed in the 25 years since the laws were put in place. (Patch)

Two boys are missing after going swimming off Rockaway Beach on Tuesday. A third teenager was with them, but he was rescued by some surfers. (amNY)

The key to saving our food may be urban beekeeping. (HuffPost)

More annoying than someone in front of you at a show holding up their phone at a show to block your view is having to leave your phone in a locked bag before you get into the show, and more and more shows are using this system. (Gothamist)

Two pieces of the Manhattan Bridge were removed over the weekend due to containing lead and being structurally unsound. The globes will be replaced with replicas that don’t pose a potential risk. (Gothamist)

Here are the 10 vegetarian restaurants that are among the top 50 in the nation, according to OpenTable. (Patch)

The Briefly for June 4, 2019 – The “If 311 Doesn’t Work, Try A Lawsuit” Edition

the G train lentil soup experiment, sex work is at the center of the Queens DA race, Gov Ball organizers apologize, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Missed this yesterday, but the advice for the subway after 10pm this week is “maybe not.” Service changes will be disrupting nearly every line somewhere. (6sqft)

The organizers of Governors Ball are attempting to stave off the Fyre Festival comparisons with a “transparent” backstory to what the hell happened with Sunday’s cancelations that led to people being stuck on Randall’s Island. (BrooklynVegan)

RIP “Service Changes.” Hello “Train Rerouted,” “Express to Local,” and “Multiple Impacts.” (Gothamist)

The city is already more annoying than last year, and the 311 noise complaints are proof, but here’s an interesting alternative. After complaints went nowhere, Mike Edison threatened to sue in small claims court, and it’s been working. (NY Times)

The Newtown Creek nature walk, which is really quite pleasant but has an air of being unfinished, is being expanded by the Department of Environmental Protection and connected to the eastern side of Whale Creek. (Curbed)

Inside Cowboy Technical Services, a recording studio celebrating twenty years in the city. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Hundreds of students staged an hourslong sit-in at LaGuardia High School to protest a perceived dilution of LaGuardia’s arts focus in favor of stricter academic requirements. (NY Times)

Sex work is shaping this year’s Queens DA election, with candidates trying to thread the needle of decriminalizing sex work while also eradicating the forced sex work and trafficking industry. (amNY)

If you’re wandering in Central Park looking for something new, try to find the somewhat hidden sundial that’s just inside Inventor’s Gate at East 72nd Street. When you’re there, snag a photo and tag @TheBrieflyNYC on Instagram (Ephemeral New York)

An ice cream parlor for dogs? Yes, it’s in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

OMNY is on its way into the hearts of New Yorkers. The first full weekend of its rollout saw 6,100 taps, which isn’t bad for only being available at 16 stations and on Staten Island buses. (amNY)

The World Trade Center is still unfinished. The Port Authority and Lower Manhattan Development Corporation reached a deal to move forward with a request for proposals for 5 World Trade Center, the last piece of land. With 18 years on, construction may never be finished. (Curbed)

Staten Island’s 11 oldest buildings. (Untapped Cities)

It’s been a year since the mayor called for changes to the city’s specialized high school admissions exams. What’s changed? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Raines sandwich, “an old desiccated ruin of dust-laden bread and mummified ham or cheese,” has its roots in New York’s very odd pre-prohibition drinking laws. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC’s poverty rate is down, but nearly one in five New Yorkers are still technically poor. (Patch)

Poor Jake Dobkin, whose experience with Revel, the city’s newest alternative transportation kid on the block which offers mopeds by the minute, was not ideal. Hey Jake, I’ve been waiting for my account to be approved since Saturday, so you should feel lucky you were even able to sign up! (Gothamist)

Thomas Keller and his restaurants Per Se and the French Laundry go to trial today for a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit, where they are being sued for $5 million for allegedly pushing out a staffer after she became pregnant. (Eater)

Here’s what you need to know about the Puerto Rican Day Parade this Sunday. (Curbed)

The NYC holy grail: 1-bedrooms under $1,500. (StreetEasy)

Especially considering that one-bedroom rents are at an all-time high of $2,980/month. (Curbed)

The Williamsburg “Link” buses meant to divert people from the L train to alternatives were cut from the city’s bus lineup due to a lack of use. In their place will the new B91 and B92 routes. (Gothamist)

At the last moment, the mayor is showing his support for rent control laws and marijuana legalization on a state-wide level. The legislative session ends on June 19, and at the moment neither proposal is a sure thing. (amNY)

Inside the great G train lentil soup experiment. (Gothamist)

Lyme Disease rates are down in the city for the first time in five years. Everyone wear your knee-length socks all summer! (Patch)

The 7 train tracks continue to fall apart, dropping debris on the streets below. This week it was Roosevelt Ave near 53rd St that received a free souvenir from the MTA. A reminder that the MTA feels that netting isn’t necessary to protect people from its literally crumbling infrastructure. (Jackson Heights Post)

14 essential BBQ restaurants. (Eater)

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