The Briefly for June 3, 2019 – The “Albany May Fail to Pass Gay and Trans Panic Ban for Pride” Edition

Moishe’s gets a new life, pre-K workers get a new deal, 57 early voting sites selected, the 25 most expensive homes for sale in the city, Anthony Bourdain day will be June 25, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Wu-Tang Ain’t Nothing To Fur With. (Patch)

Two bills that would ban the gay and trans panic defense (where a legal defense claiming someone else being LGBTQ caused them “extreme emotional disturbance”) are in danger of not passing in the legislature. It’s astounding that anything gets done in Albany. (Gothamist)

The city’s public defenders are demanding a raise, noting that the low pay from their job often forces them to get a second job to make ends meet. They are asking for $50 million to at least be on par with attorneys in the city’s Office of Corporate Counsel. The responsibility to allocate the funds belongs to our mayor, who would rather traipse around the country, pretending to be a presidential candidate. (Patch)

They start at $48 million. The 25 most expensive apartments in NYC. (Curbed)

What do you get with an $85 million home? For starters, two tickets to space. (Gothamist)

What to do and where to eat in Morris Park, east of the Bronx Zoo. (amNY)

Moishe’s Bake Shop, which has had more lives than a feral cat, will reopen after renovations are complete under new management and may potentially change the name to ‘Formerly Moishe’s’. (EV Grieve)

With Amazon searching for office space in Manhattan, it certainly seems that they didn’t need billions of dollars in tax incentives. There should be a lesson in there, but let’s not get our hopes up. (Slate)

George Catalano, the man caught on video attacking a Lyft driver, surrendered himself to the NYPD for reckless endangerment and assault. (Gothamist)

Chefs Eric Ripert and José Andrés announced a day of remembrance on June 25 to celebrate the life of the late, great Anthony Bourdain. (Grub Street)

Fordham University’s Rose Hill campus is home to the oldest seismic station in the United States. (Atlas Obscura)

Robin Russell-French has a bunch of walls and a desire to create the city’s next 5 Pointz. Will it be enough to lure artists to Sheepshead Bay? (Viewing NYC)

39 places for an outside date night. (The Infatuation)

What says “city park” quite like “mass gravesite with a million corpses buried by prisoners“? (6sqft)

Isaiah Thompson, the subway brake bandit, was charged with reckless endangerment and criminal trespass for creating 747 subway delay between March and May, add public lewdness charges to the pile for exposing himself to a platform of people in mid-May. (Gothamist)

The city is making changes to how pre-k teachers and childcare providers as paid, avoiding a strike. Pre-K for all is one of the mayor’s pet projects. (Chalkbeat)

The pros and cons of living in a doorman building. (StreetEasy)

The DailyMeal’s 75 best hole-in-the-wall restaurants include 21 from NYC. Highlights range from some unconventional picks to pizza staples to NYC standards. (Patch)

The West Village’s Barbuto is closed after fifteen years. This time rent is not to blame, it’s the new owner of the building who does not want a restaurant in that space. (Eater)

A veteran NYPD officer pleaded not guilty to charges that she schemed to murder her estranged husband and the young daughter of her boyfriend. (amNY)

The city’s Board of Elections added 57 early voting sites across the city, which still falls short of the 100 sites proposed by the mayor. Early voting for this fall’s election starts October 26. (Patch)

A look at the proposed BQX streetcar in its current proposed form. (amNY)

Can Sunset Park hold on to its manufacturing roots as the neighborhood is gentrifying? (Gothamist)

Mya Vizcarrondo-Rios jumped to her death from the roof of her Bronx apartment building in February after being bullied and sexually harassed by other students. A lawsuit from her parents claims the school regularly ignored her complaints. Members of the City Council are calling for a probe into what went wrong. (Patch)

The Brooklyn Jewish Children’s Museum has an interactive display wall outside the museum in Crown Heights and the NYPD’s Hate Crime Unit is investigating a message left on the wall stating “Hitler is coming.” (Gothamist)

Times Square is getting an pop-up Museum of Broadway in 2020. (amNY)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez worked as a waitress and bartender in a staged event at the Queensboro in Jackson Heights in support of a fair wage for tipped workers. (NY Times)

The case that Brad Lander, who represents Gowanus on the City Council, is making a bad faith promise with the rezoning around the Gowanus Canal. (Pardon Me For Asking)

13 new outdoor art installations not to miss in June. (Untapped Cities)

New Yorkers have never been shy about cursing in public. (Viewing NYC)

17 tropical restaurants and bars that feel like a vacation. (Eater)

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The Briefly for May 23, 2019 – The “Who is the Super-villain Destroying Our Commutes?” Edition

Gentrifying neighborhoods belong to rats, the NYPD adds nearly 300 officers to the streets, everyone hates Bill De Blasio and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The story of a community response that saved Prospect Heights’ Ode to Babel bar from becoming a victim of the NIMBY-ism that comes with gentrification. (Grub Street)

It all started with the arrest of Michael Cohen. A look behind the scenes at the full year and 450 interviews from The New York Times‘ investigation into how taxi medallions ever became worth $1 million. (NY Times)

Who is the city’s supervillain pulling emergency brakes on subways and destroying our commutes? Whoever it is, they’ve been doing it for months, and possibly tears, without getting caught. (Jalopnik)

Here’s how the NYC Care Card works and what it does and does not entitle you to. (Norwood News)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is testing her political capital with an endorsement of Tiffany Cabán for Queens District Attorney, who also received endorsements from the Democratic Socialists of America, Real Justice PAC, and the Working Families Party. The primary is June 25. (NY Times)

Eight is great… unless that’s the percent of people polled who have a favorable opinion of you. Mayor de Blasio’s national favorability rating is below the president’s and the worst among anyone running for president. (Patch)

One thing that gentrification brings to a neighborhood? Rats. You may have read about the block in Prospect Heights where the rats have basically taken over, but it’s becoming a trend across the city. As more buildings have construction done, it displaces rats by destroying their burrows, forcing them to come to the surface. (NY Times)

A guide to the OMNY, which starts its slow takeover of MetroCards in 8 short days. (Curbed)

New York City is last on the list of popular destinations for retirees to live. About 15,000 seniors moved out of the city from 2016 to 2017. The top places are, unsurprisingly, Florida and Arizona. (Patch)

Video: Here’s how you can help to compost with food scrap drop-offs. (Viewing NYC)

A city council proposal to exempt yellow cabs from congestion pricing is short-sighted and foolish, according to experts. Politicians are blaming the fees for a declining number of rides and not a combination of continued congestion on the roads and app-based alternatives that make yellow cabs less desirable. (Streetsblog)

Don’t look now, but there are more vegan options in the city than ever and chefs are working to lure unsuspecting non-vegans to the dark side. Even fast food chains like Burger King and Taco Bell are getting onboard with plant-based options. (amNY)

The city’s news moves pretty fast. Blink and you’ll miss the rest of the story. What multiple people thought was a woman dressed as a character from “The Handmaid’s Tale” on the verge of committing suicide turned out to be a folded up red umbrella. (Gothamist)

Congrats to Washington Heights’ Maelyn Jarmon for winning season 16 of The Voice. (amNY)

Everything you need to know about raising chickens in NYC. (6sqft)

It’s time to take a look at President Trump’s tax returns. A bill passed the state’s legislature on Wednesday that would allow the state to hand the President’s state tax returns to Congress. The governor has voiced support in the past and is expected to sign the bill shortly. (Patch)

Google purchased another building in Chelsea to expand its footprint and keep on target to double the number of employees in its New York offices in the next ten years. (amNY)

The “LGBT in 2021” campaign is aimed at getting better LGBTQ representation into the City Council. (amNY)

All five borough presidents joined over 70 early childhood providers and Comptroller Scott Stringer in calling on the city to scrap its plans for pre-K and early childhood programs and start over saying the current plan would weaken the city’s social safety net and hinder community-based organizations to provide early education programming. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The “Summer All-Out” program will send almost 300 additional NYPD officers to high-crime areas in an attempt to reduce homicides and violent crimes. (amNY)

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The Briefly for February 6, 2019 – The “Do You Smell Maple Syrup or an Oil Spill?” Edition

Historians plan to block the Brooklyn Promenade construction, the NYCHA gets a new leader, an atomic Super Bowl meltdown, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Get a feel for the city’s housing crisis with an interactive map of 20,000 evictions in 2018. (Curbed)

How to watch tonight’s ten person Public Advocate debate. (Patch)

Has it already been ten years since the mysterious maple syrup smell took over the city. Was it Northrax? Nope. It was a a perfume and food additive processing plant. (Gothamist)

The MTA is having a banner week. Maybe they’re celebrating the anniversary? A noxious gas filled the L train tunnel between Manhattan and Brooklyn on Tuesday as a result of an oil leak. (Brooklyn Paper)

Know your pain before you arrive. JFK, Newark, and LaGuardia’s websites now show real-time information on the wait times for taxis and TSA checkpoints. (Curbed)

The mayor expanded dual-language pre-K programs, which will now include French, Haitian Creole, Japanese, and Hebrew in addition to Spanish, Chinese, Russian, and Bengali, which are already available. The expansion has a dual purpose of also giving the mayor more control over the city’s schools. (Chalkbeat)

Why city parking is so annoying and how to master it. (Thrillist)

Historic preservation groups may sue the city if the city’s BQE plans move forward that removes the Brooklyn Promenade. (Curbed)

Apple may open a new office at Hudson Yards. Another tech company making a home in NYC without negotiating subsidies. (6sqft)

Why are condos more expensive than co-ops? (StreetEasy)

If you hate large sandwiches, this tiny egg sandwich is for you. (Eater)

Five mothers filed complaint against the NYPD after they say they were forced to pump breast milk in front of their colleagues, a violation of a 2007 law. (NY Post)

The 9 most romantic spots in NYC and also the Staten Island Ferry. (6sqft)

Governor Cuomo is claiming the state senate is playing politics with the Amazon HQ2 deal by appointing Senator Michael Gianaris to the Public Authorities Control Board. The governor has to approve Gianaris’ appointment to the board. Will he? “Well we’re not there yet.” (Gothamist)

State Senator Michael Gianaris gets the NY Times profile treatment. (NY Times)

Trump Tower: Luxury living for the morally bankrupt. (EV Grieve)

The FDNY saved 46 puppies and two cats from a burning pet store on the Upper East Side. No puppies were injured. (NY Post)

It’s a bad week for Broadway shows. “Anastasia” will lose on March 31. (NY Times)

NYC Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia will serve as interim head of NYCHA, Garcia is the head of the Department of Sanitation and also the city’s lead czar. (Pix 11)

MoMA will close for four months to re-envision how the collection is presented, from June 15 to October 21. (Patch)

The East Village’s Atomic Wings had a super atomic meltdown during the Super Bowl. (Eater)

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