The Briefly for June 2, 2020 – The “Repeal Civil Rights Law Section 50-a” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: An NYPD union is suspended from Twitter, the arguments for defunding the NYPD, Revel and Citi Bike shut down during curfew, cute trash pandas, and more

Today – Low: 63˚ High: 71˚
Rain overnight.

Over the weekend, an NYPD officer pulled his gun out and pointed it at a crowd of protestors and it was caught on video. The NYPD is conducting an internal review, but the mayor took no time to call for this cop’s gun and badge. (Kevin Duggan for amNewYork Metro)

The NYPD’s union has spent millions of dollars protecting Civil Rights Law section 50-a, which prohibits the city from releasing findings of misbehavior of NYPD cops, and they are getting ready to dig into their pockets to fight reform, which has the support of the governor and mayor. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

On the state senate’s website, you can sign your support for the repeal of 50-a.

The cries to defund the NYPD are getting louder and they’re starting to come from elected officials. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

It took public shaming from AOC to Corey Johnson to literally everyone who saw the footage, but the mayor is ready to admit that the NYPD driving an SUV into a crowd of people is “dangerous and unacceptable” and doesn’t think he “expressed it as well as I should have.” (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

When Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux designed Union Square, they specifically designed a portion of the park for public gatherings and protests. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

“We have to call out everyone who says anything that is racist, on any level. Don’t be scared of telling Cuomo that he’s speaking racist language. If you sit in these city agency and Corporate meetings as a black person but afraid to call racism out then YOU are part of the problem. Stop being scared. Be strong for your children and grandchildren.”
– Vernon Jones / CEO of JIG Media for East New York News, The NYPD Slave Catching Tactics Give Reason to Create a New Way To Hold Police Accountable for Their Violations Against Black New Yorkers

At 11:00 last night, the first night of NYC’s curfew, I found myself on my way home from the people gathering outside Brooklyn’s 77th precinct, realizing I could have gotten there quicker had I jumped on a Revel or Citi Bike but kept walking anyway. I was wrong because both services shut down at 11 pm with the curfew. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

“It’s a mafia mentality. It’s a ‘If you speak out against us, you’re not with us’ kind of deal. If the writing on the wall is ‘let’s go arrest people’ and the people happen to be black, [then you have to do it or] you’re not with us. It’s a shit system.” An interview with a Brooklyn cop. (Zainab Iqbal for BKLYNER)

Two Brooklynites and one upstate New Yorker were arraigned in federal court for allegedly throwing Molotov cocktails at police cars in two separate incidents during protests against police brutality on May 30. (Ben Verde for amNewYork Metro)

Manhattan state Senator Brad Hoylman called upon the city’s five district attorneys Monday not to prosecute people arrested for disorderly conduct or unlawful assembly during protests, charging that “protesting injustice is not a crime.” (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

“We can no longer tolerate the police officers who do not uphold the rule of law but instead engage in murder, assault and racial profiling, and then protect each other.”
– Francis Greenburger and Cheryl Roberts for amNew York Metro, Is there any justice left in America?

How did you learn about the arrest of the mayor’s daughter? The same way the mayor did, he read about it in the news. How did the information about the mayor’s daughter get to the news? The union that represents the NYPD’s sergeants tweeted out personal information about Chiara de Blasio. They were temporarily suspended from Twitter for the privacy breach. (Dana Rubenstein and Jeffrey C. Mays for NY Times)

“Behind the crowd, a four-year-old black boy tried to teach his baby brother how to clap hands. He held his hands and moved them towards as the crowd loudly clapped and shouted: “I can’t breathe.” ” (Ali Tufan Koc for Bedford + Bowery)

“I am tired. Tired of how routine violence against African Americans at the hands of white people has been and continues to be. Angry as a journalist that this has happened so often that we all know the angles that must be covered, the questions to be asked, the stories to be written. Angrier still that as an African American journalist, I must explain, again and again, how dehumanizing this all is.”
– Amanda Barrett for Brooklyn Eagle, American Diary: To be Black and a journalist at this moment

Five things to know if you’re going out to protest in New York City. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Council Speaker Corey Johnson and Bronx Councilmember Ritchie Torres are demanding an independent investigation into the NYPD’s actions during a weekend of protests, challenging Mayor de Blasio’s plan to direct the Corporation Counsel and Department of Investigations to investigate. They want an investigation that is not done by any office controlled by the mayor. (Matt Tracy for Gay City News)

10 riots in the city’s history. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

This will be the only mention of damage caused in Soho during protests. Don’t mix the message of protestors with the damage of looters. (Daniel Maurer for Bedford + Bowery) note: I’m not saying that Bedford + Bowery is doing this, they do a good job of pointing out that the damage was caused by people separate from the George Floyd protests.

Adorable: To close out today, here are some photos of a trash panda and her babies of Carroll Park, who have taken up residence ever since the park has been closed to people. (Katia Kelly for Pardon Me For Asking, photos by Gary Dolan)

The Briefly for April 6, 2020 – The “We Have Infected the Tigers in the Bronx Zoo” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Dog parks are closed in NYC, NYSC forced to stop charging memberships, a map of essential construction, art for physical distancing, and more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 62˚
Clear throughout the day.

Mario Salerno, hero. Mario’s the landlord in Williamsburg who waived April’s rent for all his tenants. (Rebeca Ibarra for Gothamist)

The city is closing all dog parks and runs

Baruch Feldheim, who was arrested for price gouging over 100,000 masks, over half a million gloves and 192,000 N95 respirators, is an asshole and his supply is being given to doctors and nurses for their fair market value. (Neil Vigdor for NY Times)

The USNS Comfort is here with its 1,000 hospital beds, and there are 20 patients on it. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

China sent 1,000 ventilators to assist in the state’s efforts to keep us all alive. (Alyse Stanley for Gizmodo)

The state launched a new COVID-19 tracker that gives county by county information, including numbers on testing, infections, and deaths. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

The city leased at least 20 hotels to deal with the coronavirus hospital surge, converting entire floors into hospital wards for a total of 10,000 additional beds. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

11 pieces of art to discover at a safe physical distance. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Wear something over your nose and mouth when you go out in public. This is to save the rest of the city from you, even if you don’t think that you’re sick, you may still be carrying COVID-19. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

It’s an awful benchmark, but here we are. New York’s deaths from COVID-19 outnumber the deaths on 9/11. (Dana Rubenstein for Politico)

A clarification on last week’s “the NYPD won’t show up if you have a minor car crash” story, outlining the scenarios where the NYPD will actually show up. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Amazon’s PR campaign to shift blame to Christopher Smalls, the man who organized the walkout in their Staten Island facility, is failing. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The Metropolitan Opera is back this week, streaming performances of Puccini, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Donizetti, and Gounod every night. (Adam Feldman for Time Out)

State legislators are pushing for the city to provide EMS workers with housing during the COVID-19 crisis, as some have resorted to sleeping in their cars to avoid bringing the virus into their homes. (Anna Quinn for Patch)

Complaints to 311 about noise have dropped significantly, despite everyone being told to stay home as much as possible. Reports are down over 30% from last year. Are we being quieter or are we deciding it’s not worth bothering the police? (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

RIP Carmine Notaro, the owner of Carmine’s Original Pizza in Greenpoint. (Greenpointers)

Video: Union Square, Greenwich Village, and Washington Square Park in a pandemic. (James and Karla)

Curious if a construction site near your apartment is deemed “essential?” Check out the new map from the Department of Buildings listing Essential Active Construction Sites. (Norman Oder for Atlantic Yards/Pacific Park Project)

The bleak reality inside Rikers Island’s coronavirus quarantine unit. (Angelina Chapin for HuffPost)

A 51-year-old woman was beaten on a city bus in the Bronx last week by a group of riders who blamed her for the COVID-19 outbreak. Three 15-year-old girls were arrested for hate crime assault, menacing, and harassment. The NYPD is searching for a fourth teen. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

360° Video: Driving through an empty Times Square. (ActionKid)

The state’s Attorney General’s office ordered New York Sports Club to stop charging for membership while their gyms are forcibly closed. If anyone has ever had a membership with NYSC, you know how impossible it is to get them to stop charging your credit card. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Video: Learn about Manhattan’s original citizens, the Lenape. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

“Only in the last really 48 hours or so do they feel they’ve seen evidence around the world ― particularly a new study coming out of Singapore ― that shows more evidence that this disease can be spread by asymptomatic people.” This wasn’t a quote from the governor of Georgia, this was our own idiot mayor saying something that the rest of us have assumed for weeks. (Ja’han Jones for HuffPost)

The city banned the use of Zoom for remote learning over security and privacy concerns. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

The Department of Education’s grab-and-go free meal service has been expanded to include anyone who wants food, no questions asked. There are 435 pickup spots across the city for pickups between 7:30 am and 11:30 am. (Sophia Cheng for Gothamist)

What kind of idiot do you have to be to gather by the hundreds for a funeral for a man who died of COVID-19? The death itself should stand as a literal reminder to treat this pandemic seriously, yet the NYPD had to break up a crowd of hundreds who gathered for the funeral of a rabbi. (Molly Crane-Newman for Daily News)

The best burgers in NYC still available for delivery. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Thanks to Chris Walker for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for June 17, 2019 – The “New York State is Stepping Up Where the City Failed” Edition

Cameras are in OMNY scanners, the smallest island in the city, the “Tombs Angel”, the secrets of NYU and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late night subway service changes are fairly busy, with cuts and changes along the 1, 4, 5, 7, A, D, E, F, and N lines. (Subway Weekender)

First person memories from the police raid that led to the Stonewall Inn riot. (NY Times)

The top ten secrets of NYU. Not a secret? People who graduated from NYU, because they’ll tell you any opportunity they get. (Untapped Cities)

It should surprise no one, but we’re hitting peak season to eat out in New York. (Eater)

Remember that company putting LED billboards on the city’s waterways? The state’s legislature has a bill that would ban them completely, taking an action that the city’s government seemed unable to do. (Gothamist)

The rent reform bills, only an agreement early last week, were will be challenged in court by landlords. (Curbed)

Here’s what the rent reforms mean for market-rate tenants. (Gothamist)

How will the state’s rent reform impact the Bronx? (Norwood News)

The five men who stabbed 15-year-old Lesandro Guzman-Feliz to death nearly a year ago were found guilty of first and second-degree murder, conspiracy, and gang assault. They will be sentenced July 16. (amNY)

Ever wonder how you get a pool onto the roof of a 68-story building? You can watch Brooklyn Point’s infinity pool, the highest infinity pool in the western hemisphere, being brought up 680 feet in the air. (6sqft)

As a part of Penn Station’s renovations, the mainstay bar Tracks will be forced to close at the end of August along with McDonalds, Jamba Juice, and a few others. The work is expected to finish in 2022. (Gothamist)

After being lost in storage and nearly forgotten, a monument to Rebecca Salamone Foster is ready to be unveiled this month in the state’s supreme courthouse. Foster was known as the “Tombs Angel” from her work at “the Tombs” city jail in lower Manhattan. The Tombs, to quote Dickens “would bring disgrace to the most despotic empire in the world.” (NY Times)

We’re down to the wire for the state legislature’s session. Still on the docket is drivers licenses for undocumented immigrants, which has strong support, and the legalization of the recreational use of marijuana. Legalization has seen a slight resurgence in support, with pockets of resistance on Long Island and arguments about taxes across the board. (amNY)

“With the first hot nights in June police despatches, that record the killing of men and women by rolling off roofs and window-sills while asleep, announce that the time of greatest suffering among the poor is at hand” From Jacob Riis’s How the Other Half Lives, emphasize the hell of summer in the Lower East Side’s tenements. (Ephemeral New York)

The 2021 mayoral race is already on the mind of likely candidates and Corey Johnson just passed a bill that will impact that election’s campaign donations and benefit him directly, which is a hard pill to swallow for his potential opponents. (Gotham Gazette)

Last week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health, including Beach 97th St’s La Barracuda, which joined the hundred point club. (Patch)

If you’ve got the upper-body strength, you can help keep The Giglio lift tradition alive in Williamsburg during the Giglio Feast, a tradition since 1903. (Gothamist)

A look at U Thant Island, the smallest island in New York City. (Viewing NYC)

The city has reached a deal on a budget for the 2020 fiscal year. At $92.8, the budget is the largest in history and 4% larger than last year’s budget, with funding increases for social workers, libraries, parks, and abortion services. (Gothamist)

Five takeaways from the city’s budget deal. (NY Times)

.00025% of the city’s budgets, $250,000, was set aside to provide access to safe and legal abortion services, with one-third of that going towards those traveling from out-of-state. The Abortion Access Fund offers assessments within a 24-hour period and also provides referrals to groups that cover transportation costs. (Jezebel)

Photos from The High Line Hat Party, which is as ridiculous as it sounds. (Gothamist)
http://gothamist.com/2019/06/14/high_line_hat_party_2019_photos.php

BAM employees have voted in favor of unionizing. (Hyperallergic)

Brooklyn Academy of Music Employees Vote in Favor of Union

The OMNY scanners are convenient, and there’s a camera built into them with infrared capabilities. The cameras were conveniently left out of OMNY’s privacy policy. (Gothamist)

New York sports 11 of the top 100 restaurants in the country that “incorporate wine in thoughtful and exciting ways.” (Patch)

From the city’ best cannolis at Madonia Borhters to fresh pasta at Borgatti’s Ravioli and Egg Noodles: A walking tour along Arthur Avenue, the Bronx’s Little Italy. (Eater)

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