The Briefly for May 27, 2020 – The “The Last Region Under PAUSE” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The city caps Seamless fees for restaurants, a $1,000 to fill out the census, Uber and Lyft drivers sue for unemployment, Central Park Karen, and more

Today – Low: 62˚ High: 70˚
Overcast throughout the day.

Queens has a new Cold Case Unit under DA Melinda Katz, dedicated to solving the borough’s oldest and unsolved homicide cases. There are currently about 2,200 unsolved homicides in Queens. (Queens County Politics)

“I”m going to tell them there’s an African-American man threatening my life.” The story of the Central Park Karen, Amy Cooper, whose week started with a threatening to use the NYPD as a weapon, and two days later she was fired for her job and surrendered her dog. (Zack Linly for The Root)

It’s no surprise, but today it’s a reality. New York City is the only region of the state still under the PAUSE order by Governor Cuomo. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Have you filled out the census yet? Only 50% of the city has and we’re lagging 10% behind the rest of the country. In an effort to bump up the numbers, NYC Census 2020 is giving away $1,000 Seamless gift cards. More than a gift card, I’m sure you’re seeing photos and videos from around the country of idiots getting together without masks. These are the people who will have more representation and funding in and from the government because they filled out their census this year. These yahoos are gonna fly to NYC from whatever podunk, backwater town they live in, and infect more New Yorkers while they go out for SantaCon or take photos with the Naked Cowboy or puke on the floor of a bathroom in the East Village or walk extremely slowly on the sidewalk right in front of you. These are the people that can fill in their census and yet we can’t seem to get our shit together and need gift cards to Seamless as an incentive. Rant over. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewyork Metro)

Want to bring a smile to someone? Send some letters to some older Upper West Siders. (Claude Benjamin for I Love the Upper West Side)

Uber and Lyft drivers are suing the state for timely payment of unemployment benefits. Currently, drivers have to wait months to receive standard unemployment benefits, unlike the standard two to three weeks like most workers. (Noam Scheiber for NY Times)

Video: Watch former New Yorkers try L.A. bagels. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The city has hired more than 1,700 contact tracers to get the city closer to the metrics necessary to start its reopening. (NY1)

How good of a salesman is Governor Cuomo? We’re about to find out, as the governor heads to Washington to convince President Trump to fund the extension of the Second Ave subway, the new Penn Station, and a train to LaGuardia. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A quick look at the 80-year history of the Copacabana. (Maria Sherman for Jezebel)

The Obie Awards, honoring Off and Off Off Broadway theater, is going virtual. You can catch the Obie Awards on YouTube on June 4, hosted by Cole Escola. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Alt-side parking is suspended through June 7. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

What if no one wants to save New York’s restaurants? (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

ConEd is trying to raise rates this summer and the City Council is having none of it. ConEd is warning that demand may exceed last summer where brown and blackouts plagued portions of the city. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Video: A pre/post Covid-19 comparison walk around Midtown. (ActionKid)

Seventeen of the city’s 20 hate crimes against Asians in 2020 have been coronavirus related. 20 may not seem like much, but compare that to 2019’s hate crimes against Asians at 3. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

The mayor signed a package of bills into laws intended to protect small businesses by imposing limits on third-party food delivery services, extending the suspension of sidewalk cafe fee collection, and protecting commercial tenants from harassment and personal liability. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Would you go to a concert if it meant having to wear this weird neon spacesuit? How do you drink or go to the bathroom if you’re sealed inside a spacesuit at a show? (Erin Christie for BrooklynVegan)

Video: New York’s “Wear A MAsk” PSA contest has a winner. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

The New York Stock Exchange partially opened on Tuesday and is prohibiting employees and visitors from taking mass transit, something extremely impractical to use as an example for other businesses. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Nets opened its training facility in Sunset Park to players for voluntary workouts with a limit of four players in the facility at a time. (JT Torenli for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Restrictions on third-party delivery companies like Seamless or Uber Eats caps fees at 15 percent per order for delivery and 5 percent per order for any other charge while the city is under emergency and for 90 days beyond. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Actors’ Equity Association barred its 51,000 members from in-person auditions, rehearsals, and performances and says they will not lift that restriction until there is fast, reliable testing for the novel coronavirus and widespread contact tracing. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

A breakdown of the costs of what’s recommended before you move to NYC. (Localize.City)

Why hasn’t Mayor de Blasio visited Rikers Island at all during his second term? (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

Recreating recipes from restaurants is a long-standing tradition which has seen a revival under stay-at-home orders. Are we chasing the recipe and a meal or are we chasing a feeling and trying to rekindle memories? (Pete Wells for NY Times)

Video: Recreating New York’s best pancakes from Clinton St Baking Company. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

Thanks to reader Alexa for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 4, 2019 – The “If 311 Doesn’t Work, Try A Lawsuit” Edition

the G train lentil soup experiment, sex work is at the center of the Queens DA race, Gov Ball organizers apologize, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Missed this yesterday, but the advice for the subway after 10pm this week is “maybe not.” Service changes will be disrupting nearly every line somewhere. (6sqft)

The organizers of Governors Ball are attempting to stave off the Fyre Festival comparisons with a “transparent” backstory to what the hell happened with Sunday’s cancelations that led to people being stuck on Randall’s Island. (BrooklynVegan)

RIP “Service Changes.” Hello “Train Rerouted,” “Express to Local,” and “Multiple Impacts.” (Gothamist)

The city is already more annoying than last year, and the 311 noise complaints are proof, but here’s an interesting alternative. After complaints went nowhere, Mike Edison threatened to sue in small claims court, and it’s been working. (NY Times)

The Newtown Creek nature walk, which is really quite pleasant but has an air of being unfinished, is being expanded by the Department of Environmental Protection and connected to the eastern side of Whale Creek. (Curbed)

Inside Cowboy Technical Services, a recording studio celebrating twenty years in the city. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Hundreds of students staged an hourslong sit-in at LaGuardia High School to protest a perceived dilution of LaGuardia’s arts focus in favor of stricter academic requirements. (NY Times)

Sex work is shaping this year’s Queens DA election, with candidates trying to thread the needle of decriminalizing sex work while also eradicating the forced sex work and trafficking industry. (amNY)

If you’re wandering in Central Park looking for something new, try to find the somewhat hidden sundial that’s just inside Inventor’s Gate at East 72nd Street. When you’re there, snag a photo and tag @TheBrieflyNYC on Instagram (Ephemeral New York)

An ice cream parlor for dogs? Yes, it’s in Bushwick. (Bushwick Daily)

OMNY is on its way into the hearts of New Yorkers. The first full weekend of its rollout saw 6,100 taps, which isn’t bad for only being available at 16 stations and on Staten Island buses. (amNY)

The World Trade Center is still unfinished. The Port Authority and Lower Manhattan Development Corporation reached a deal to move forward with a request for proposals for 5 World Trade Center, the last piece of land. With 18 years on, construction may never be finished. (Curbed)

Staten Island’s 11 oldest buildings. (Untapped Cities)

It’s been a year since the mayor called for changes to the city’s specialized high school admissions exams. What’s changed? (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Raines sandwich, “an old desiccated ruin of dust-laden bread and mummified ham or cheese,” has its roots in New York’s very odd pre-prohibition drinking laws. (Atlas Obscura)

NYC’s poverty rate is down, but nearly one in five New Yorkers are still technically poor. (Patch)

Poor Jake Dobkin, whose experience with Revel, the city’s newest alternative transportation kid on the block which offers mopeds by the minute, was not ideal. Hey Jake, I’ve been waiting for my account to be approved since Saturday, so you should feel lucky you were even able to sign up! (Gothamist)

Thomas Keller and his restaurants Per Se and the French Laundry go to trial today for a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit, where they are being sued for $5 million for allegedly pushing out a staffer after she became pregnant. (Eater)

Here’s what you need to know about the Puerto Rican Day Parade this Sunday. (Curbed)

The NYC holy grail: 1-bedrooms under $1,500. (StreetEasy)

Especially considering that one-bedroom rents are at an all-time high of $2,980/month. (Curbed)

The Williamsburg “Link” buses meant to divert people from the L train to alternatives were cut from the city’s bus lineup due to a lack of use. In their place will the new B91 and B92 routes. (Gothamist)

At the last moment, the mayor is showing his support for rent control laws and marijuana legalization on a state-wide level. The legislative session ends on June 19, and at the moment neither proposal is a sure thing. (amNY)

Inside the great G train lentil soup experiment. (Gothamist)

Lyme Disease rates are down in the city for the first time in five years. Everyone wear your knee-length socks all summer! (Patch)

The 7 train tracks continue to fall apart, dropping debris on the streets below. This week it was Roosevelt Ave near 53rd St that received a free souvenir from the MTA. A reminder that the MTA feels that netting isn’t necessary to protect people from its literally crumbling infrastructure. (Jackson Heights Post)

14 essential BBQ restaurants. (Eater)

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