The Briefly for May 23, 2019 – The “Who is the Super-villain Destroying Our Commutes?” Edition

Gentrifying neighborhoods belong to rats, the NYPD adds nearly 300 officers to the streets, everyone hates Bill De Blasio and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The story of a community response that saved Prospect Heights’ Ode to Babel bar from becoming a victim of the NIMBY-ism that comes with gentrification. (Grub Street)

It all started with the arrest of Michael Cohen. A look behind the scenes at the full year and 450 interviews from The New York Times‘ investigation into how taxi medallions ever became worth $1 million. (NY Times)

Who is the city’s supervillain pulling emergency brakes on subways and destroying our commutes? Whoever it is, they’ve been doing it for months, and possibly tears, without getting caught. (Jalopnik)

Here’s how the NYC Care Card works and what it does and does not entitle you to. (Norwood News)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is testing her political capital with an endorsement of Tiffany Cabán for Queens District Attorney, who also received endorsements from the Democratic Socialists of America, Real Justice PAC, and the Working Families Party. The primary is June 25. (NY Times)

Eight is great… unless that’s the percent of people polled who have a favorable opinion of you. Mayor de Blasio’s national favorability rating is below the president’s and the worst among anyone running for president. (Patch)

One thing that gentrification brings to a neighborhood? Rats. You may have read about the block in Prospect Heights where the rats have basically taken over, but it’s becoming a trend across the city. As more buildings have construction done, it displaces rats by destroying their burrows, forcing them to come to the surface. (NY Times)

A guide to the OMNY, which starts its slow takeover of MetroCards in 8 short days. (Curbed)

New York City is last on the list of popular destinations for retirees to live. About 15,000 seniors moved out of the city from 2016 to 2017. The top places are, unsurprisingly, Florida and Arizona. (Patch)

Video: Here’s how you can help to compost with food scrap drop-offs. (Viewing NYC)

A city council proposal to exempt yellow cabs from congestion pricing is short-sighted and foolish, according to experts. Politicians are blaming the fees for a declining number of rides and not a combination of continued congestion on the roads and app-based alternatives that make yellow cabs less desirable. (Streetsblog)

Don’t look now, but there are more vegan options in the city than ever and chefs are working to lure unsuspecting non-vegans to the dark side. Even fast food chains like Burger King and Taco Bell are getting onboard with plant-based options. (amNY)

The city’s news moves pretty fast. Blink and you’ll miss the rest of the story. What multiple people thought was a woman dressed as a character from “The Handmaid’s Tale” on the verge of committing suicide turned out to be a folded up red umbrella. (Gothamist)

Congrats to Washington Heights’ Maelyn Jarmon for winning season 16 of The Voice. (amNY)

Everything you need to know about raising chickens in NYC. (6sqft)

It’s time to take a look at President Trump’s tax returns. A bill passed the state’s legislature on Wednesday that would allow the state to hand the President’s state tax returns to Congress. The governor has voiced support in the past and is expected to sign the bill shortly. (Patch)

Google purchased another building in Chelsea to expand its footprint and keep on target to double the number of employees in its New York offices in the next ten years. (amNY)

The “LGBT in 2021” campaign is aimed at getting better LGBTQ representation into the City Council. (amNY)

All five borough presidents joined over 70 early childhood providers and Comptroller Scott Stringer in calling on the city to scrap its plans for pre-K and early childhood programs and start over saying the current plan would weaken the city’s social safety net and hinder community-based organizations to provide early education programming. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The “Summer All-Out” program will send almost 300 additional NYPD officers to high-crime areas in an attempt to reduce homicides and violent crimes. (amNY)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for March 25, 2019 – The “Next Neighborhood to be Gentrified” Edition

Central Park has a new hot bird, the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, the Gandalf of Greenpoint, the man caught kicking a woman in the head arrested, and more in today’s daily NYC news brief.

Bad news for you if you’re on one of the seven subway lines with late night closures and service changes this week. (Subway Changes)

The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire was 108 years ago today. (The Forward)

A look at 100 years of progress for women in New York’s political positions of power. (NY Times)

Eight monuments dedicated to real women. (Untapped Cities)

Is Brownsville going to be the next target for gentrification? The National Community Reinvestment Coalition’s “Shifting Neighborhood” report says it’s already begun. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Turns out Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick aren’t great as neighbors. (NY Post)

DUMBO’s cobblestone streets are disappearing. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Forget the hot Mandarin Duck, this season’s new hot bird is the Central Park Great Blue Heron. (Gothamist)

Yeah, birds are cool but how about the rise in the population of seals? (Viewing NYC)

The Gandalf of Greenpoint is the subway wizard we need. (Bedford + Bowery)

What constitutes a museum? Does a collection of 100 mugshots displayed in a Prospect Heights apartment count? (Gothamist)

Eat in Greenpoint like you’re Polish. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city’s Sacred Sites Open House weekend is on May 18 and 19 if you’ve been looking to get a look behind the scenes of the city’s houses of worship. (amNY)

The man who was allegedly shown kicking an elderly woman in the head on the subway was arrested. He claims the old woman threatened to stab him, his wife, and his daughter and that’s why he kicked her in the face. (NY Post)

The prosecutor supervising Michael Cohen’s case is leaving his job in April. (Politico)

Remember last week’s proposal to put a bike lane on the Verrazzano Bridge? It’s dead. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

A bunch of buzzkill doctors issued a joint statement opposing marijuana legalization in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Delaware. (NY Post)

MTA Unveils New Designated Seating For Commuters Who Look Like They’re About To Snap” (The Onion)

People in East Flatbush are so comfortable with the low crime rates in their neighborhood they are leaving their cars unlocked, causing an uptick in crime. *shakes head* (Bklyner)

The house belonging to Michael Corleone in ‘The Godfather’ is for sale. Perhaps you’d like to make them an offer they can’t refure? (NY Post)

Better get your Zyrtec, Claritin, and whatever else you can think of now. This year’s allergy season is going to be hell. (Patch)

The city’s trash panda population are getting more and more brazen with every passing day. This time they claimed ownership of the A train tracks in Queens. (Patch)

Despite saying the death of the Amazon deal has been “talked to death,” the governor couldn’t help but talk about it even more, saying the opposing politicians engaged in a “form of corruption.” (28.2% of our readers said they blame Cuomo and de Blasio for the collapse of the deal) (NY Post)

The Guggenheim will no longer accept money from the Sackler family, the family who profited heavily from the opioid crisis. It follows the Tate and the British National Portrait Gallery. (NY Times)

Don’t call for robocall scams this tax season. Actually, don’t answer your phone until the fall. (Viewing NYC)

HUD Administrator Lynne Patton continued her tour of NYCHA facilities, finally hitting Staten Island, where she said the development was “inhumane” and a “humanitarian crisis.” (NY Post)

If you rent an apartment, do you have a right to a key? As keyless systems are on the rise, some tenants don’t have keys to their homes. (NY Times)

How bad is Amtrak service at Penn Station? How about a maintenance train derailed over the weekend. (NY Post)

A man wearing only a shirt (the full Donald Duck”) was shot by the NYPD in Queens after setting a car on fire outside a police precint. He was arrested and is expected to survive. (NY Times)

A goat escaped a slaughterhouse in the Bronx. Seeking asylum, the goat found sanctuary at a farm upstate, and that’s not a euphemism. (NY Post)

Say hello to four of the city’s newest restaurants. (amNY)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for December 28, 2018 – The “What the Hell Was That In the Sky? Was It Aliens?” Edition

This weekend’s subway outages and changes, the Astoria borealis, a record low number of homicides in Brooklyn, New Year’s Eve notes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

All things considered the planned changes and outages on the subway this weekend are minimal. (6qsft)


Holy shit! Did you see the sky last night? (NY Post)

A transformer fire at a Con Edison substation in Astoria lit up the night sky around 9pm with a Independence Day style light show. (NY Times)

The (non) alien explosion caused a relatively small number of power outages, but the most significant was LaGuardia Airport. (Gothamist)

The explosion should remind us all about the city’s reliance on burning oil. Astoria and Long Island City have the highest rates of air pollution in the city thanks to the ConEd generating stations in each neighborhood which burn over six million gallons of oil a year combined. (HuffPost)


Which neighborhoods dominated NYC’s dining scene in 2018? (Eater)

A city Sanitation Department employee, Mervin Freeman, was arrested for allegedly strangling his 14-year-old daughter. The Sanitation Department is launching an investigation as Freeman denies the incident. (NY Post)

There’s an easier way to make a buck than to try to walk away with an ATM, but it didn’t stop these four guys in Prospect Heights. (NY Post)

Someone in East New York won $298.3 million on Wednesday night’s Powerball. Did you buy a ticket at Arnold’s Service Station on Linden Blvd? (NY Post)

What a year. Nine of the most improbable political transformations in 2018. (NY Times)

Governor Cuomo stripped the State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli of the ability to review construction contracts for SUNY schools. Kinda weird for someone whose former top aide is going to prison for corruption. (NY Post)

The NYPD will file more serious charges against the homeless men who fought an officer in a subway station, including riot, obstructing a governmental administration, and attempted assault. (Gothamist)

The NIMBY’s at the West 58th Street Coalition, representing Billionaire’s Row, has successfully sued the city to grant a temporary injunction against the construction of a homeless shelter in the former Savoy Hotel. (NY Post)

When the MTA gets to define “good service,” the subways can easily run with “good service.” (Gothamist)

Brooklyn’s Winterfest won’t be back next year. Here’s a complete look behind the bedlam at the Brooklyn Museum. (The Bridge)

Who thought in the same year New York Magazine would write about Union Pool and The New York Times would be on the Output beat? The Times is soliciting stories about Output. (NY Times)

Manhattan’s Hudson Square has become so dangerous (how dangerous is it?) the city’s Transportation Department hired crossing guards for adults. (NY Times)

Brooklyn is headed to set a record with under 100 homicides in 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

On January 1, it will become illegal for pharmacies to sell cigarettes in the city. (amNY)

The updated list of the city’s hottest cocktail bars. (Eater)


Here are the New Year’s Eve street closures for Times Square. (Curbed)

Times Square isn’t the only fireworks in town on New Year’s Eve. Here are four alternatives. (Curbed)

Meet Tom Brennan, the man in charge of the most famous ball of crystal in the world. (NY Times)

It takes a full year of preparation to coordinate the dumping of 3,000 pounds of confetti. (NY Times)

Getting around the city on New Year’s Day won’t be simple. (amNY)

Astoria Borealis Reflection by Dustin Brown
Astoria Borealis Reflection by Dustin Brown

Thank you to Dustin Brown for the images of last night’s fire

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.