The Briefly for October 11-12, 2020 – The “SERENITY NOW!” Sunday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: The Raccoon Show, Dermot Shea calls BLM protesters “spoiled brats”, cuffing season declared, the top 12 neighborhood pizza slices, and more

Today – Low: 55˚ High: 68˚
Rain in the evening and overnight.

Midtown’s Roosevelt Hotel is closing at the end of the month after 96 years. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

There is a law in NYC that local police cannot enforce federal immigration law, that does not stop ICE agents from pretending to be local police during raids. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

When the city lacks its usual entertainment, it turns to the trash pandas. Welcome to The Raccoon Show. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Spider-Man 3 has begun filming in Queens. Look for the filming notices for “SERENITY NOW.” Yes, all of the fake filming titles for Spider-Man movies have been George Costanza references. (Jacob Kaye for amNewYork Metro)

Inside a Bronx freshman’s first day back in the classroom. (Alex Zimmerman for Chalkbeat)

Maybe after this is all over, we should stop putting schools in windowless basements. (Cindy Rodriguez for Gothamist)

The city owes its public school teachers $900 million, which dates back a decade and has its roots in the Bloomberg administration’s dealing of the last financial crisis. The city tried to punt on those payments until an arbitrator ruled the city must pay its teachers half of what is owed by the end of the month, the other half in July 2021 and agree to a no-layoffs provision through June 2021 along with teachers getting a 3.5% pay bump by May 2021. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

A new state requirement will demand that 20% of all students and staff enrolled in in-person learning be tested weekly for Covid-19 inside the state’s “yellow” zones with the mandate in effect by Friday, October 16. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Farewell to Queens Comfort on 30th Ave in Astoria. Today is its last day of service. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Broadway will remain shut down through May 2021, extending past the last “end date” in March. (Broadway World)

Satire: Hundreds Of Cane-Wielding Demonstrators Pull Governor Into Kickline To Protest Broadway Shutdown. (The Onion)

Broadway is known as “The Great White Way” thanks to the volume of lights on the various marquees, but the nickname remains appropriate for other reasons too, as a new report shows that only 20% of shows on Broadway or Off-Broadway during the 2017-2018 season were created by people of color, two-thirds were filled by white actors and 94% directors were white. (Sahar Bahr for NY Times)

Had enough of apartment living in NYC and yearn for a life on the seas but still in the city? Here’s everything you need to know about houseboat living in NYC. (Cait Etherington for 6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio has chosen the city’s next rezoning battleground: SoHo and NoHo, from Astor Place down to Canal Street. The opponents say it will “ruin” the neighborhood’s character and the proponents argue that it will bring 3,200 apartments to the area, with 800 below-market rate. The deciding City Councilmember will be Margaret Chin, provided the city moves forward with approval before she’s term-limited out in 2021. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: There’s a house in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens that’s for sale that my wife is obsessed with. Once you see the photos of the $2.75 million pre-war house, you’ll become obsessed too. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Photos: Tribeca’s Pier 26 is now open, complete with a man-made tidal marsh called the Tide Deck. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The City Reliquary is in danger of closing. It’s one of the city’s oddest and most unique and interesting museums in addition to being a non-profit civic organization. In non-pandemic times, it is worth your visit. Now it needs your help. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

There will never be a story about the Grand Central Terminal lost and found that I will not link to. Years ago my best friend left an acoustic guitar on a Metro-North train and found it at the lost and found a few days later, just one of the roughly 2,500 items lost every month. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

Here is the full list of NYC politicians being endorsed by Our Revolution, founded by Bernie Sanders. (amNewYork Metro)

How much does a life cost? Last year Matt Palacios was killed by Luc C. Vu, who was driving a dump truck and made an illegal left turn. Court records indicate that Vu’s driver’s license has been revoked for six months, that he paid a $250 fine on the failure to yield to a bicyclist charge, and that he will receive a conditional discharge in one year if he does not get into additional legal trouble. $250 for taking Matt’s life. (Mike Johnson for PWInsider)

“I don’t know what you call them — peaceful protesters — maybe spoiled brats at this point.” -NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea on NY1. The NYPD is on pace to spend more than $100 million beyond its budget for overtime this year. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

On the same night that NYPD officers stood by while protesters attacked civilians and a journalist during a Borough Park protest against Covid-19 restrictions, the police department arrested four Black Lives Matter activists in Bedford-Stuyvesant for low-level offenses and detained them for two nights before they were released. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Video: Watch the NYPD be unable to break up a massive celebration full of unmasked people blocking a street in Crown Heights last week and eventually give up and go home. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Hundreds of ultra-Orthodox congregants attended an indoor prayer service in Borough Park on Friday in open defiance of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s newly imposed restrictions on religious gatherings in COVID hotspots. The service was led by a rabbi who tested positive for Covid-19 one week ago. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

MSG and the Barclays Center are becoming voting locations on November 3. Yankee Stadium? Silence. In a neighborhood that could use the most help from a neighbor, the Yankees, who pay $0 in real state taxes and pay $1/year for the land their stadium occupies, have turned their back on the local community at nearly every opportunity. (Mary Steffenhagen for New York City News Service)

Congratulations to the NYC girls who have become some of the first to ever join Scouts BSA, formerly the Boy Scouts of America. (Yasmeen Khan for Gothamist)

The NYPL released a list of 200 book titles to get you election-ready. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Dizzy’s Diner in Park Slope after 22 years. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Turns out it pays to be in the crowd for SNL. No literally, the audience is being paid $150 to be considered cast members, since audience members aren’t allowed. Each “cast member” is given a rapid Covid-19 test before entering the studio. (Julia Jacobs and Dave Itzkoff for NY Times)

The Times is declaring cuffing season, but did the last cuffing season ever officially end? (Johan Engel Bromwich and Sandra E. Garcia for NY Times)

Farewell to 88 Lan Zhou in Chinatown, who will be closing on October 31. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

The top 12 neighborhood pizza slices. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

How to support independent restaurants. (Bonnie Tsui for NY Times)

The Briefly for August 7, 2020 – The “Mess With the Bull, Get the Horns” Weekend Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Cuomo gets petty, de Blasio breaks another promise, eight NYC rooftops, how to renegotiate rent, the NYPD fights the chokehold ban, and more

Today – Low: 70˚ High: 80˚
Rain in the morning and overnight.
This weekend – Low: 71˚ High: 84˚

A guide to renegoiate your rent. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

An executive order will allow the courts to suspend eviction proceedings through September 4. It’s not a complete ban on eviction hearings, but it gives the courts leeway to suspend deadlines. (Sydney Pereira with Beth Fertig and Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Do not buy a car,” says mayor who gets driven literally everywhere. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Lucky, the East Village bar that started a petition calling for Governor Cuomo to reverse his “substantial amounts of food” mandate with drink orders, had its liquor license suspended for not serving food with its drink orders. Classic petty Cuomo. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The state attorney general’s office is suing to dissolve the NRA. AG Letitia James made the announcement on Thursday. Washington DC is also suing the NRA. 148 years ago the NRA was chartered in New York, giving the state the jurisdiction over it. (Danny Hakim for NY Times)

A look at another broken promise of Bill de Blasio: release a complete history of all complaints against every officer in the NYPD and how his corporate counsel made the decision not to release anything for the time being. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

NYPD unions brought a lawsuit seeking to stop a new city law that makes it a crime for police officers to use chokeholds or kneel on a suspect’s neck or back. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

There are over 900 NYPD officers that have refused to participate in investigations into alleged misconduct, creating an immense backlog for the Civilian Complaint Review Board. Cowards. If a private citizen doesn’t want to participate in an investigation into alleged wrongdoings on their part, they don’t seem to have a choice. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Even as its population is shrinking, the use of force against inmates at Rikers Island is at an all-time high. (Benjamin Weiser for NY Times)

Have you taken to indoor gardening? You’re not the only one. You might say that the hobby is… growing on New Yorkers. (Mili Godio for Bedford + Bowery)

Apartment Porn: A $3.25 million Brooklyn Heights waterfront loft. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

A look at the opening of Rangoon, one of NYC’s strictly Burmese restaurants. (Sai Mokhtari for Gothamist)

Welcome to the neighborhood Any Thing, a new bar in Prospect Lefferts Gardens, whose bar features only distilled and/or supported spirits that are women-owned. (Emma Orlow for Time Out)

Something’s wrong in your rented apartment. Who should pay for repairs? (AJ Jordan for Localize Labs)

Dr. Oxiris Barbot is only the latest high profile woman of color to leave the de Blasio administration. She joins Deputy Mayors Lilliam Barrios Paoli and Herminia Palacio, mayoral aide Rachel Noerdlinger, his first Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett, Children’s Services Commissioner Gladys Carrion, and NYCHA Chair Shola Olatoye. Maybe it’s time to ask the question: Does the mayor have a problem with women of color? (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

The Black Tap is starting up CrazyShake deliveries on Monday. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Exploring NYC’s iconic works of public art. (Untapped New York)

It’s an unremarkable building in St Louis, but it once stood as one of the pavilions at the World’s Fair in 1964. (Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

The world’s largest bronze gorilla sculpture, titled King Nyani by Gillie and Marc Schnatter, is coming to Hudson Yards’ Bella Abzug Park. Once installed later this month, three people will be able to fit in the gorilla’s hand. The sculpture is part of an awareness campaign to raise funds for the critically endangered gorilla species. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Next week is the peak of the annual Perseid meteor shower, which you’ll be able to see on a clear night. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Hulu’s High Fidelity series, which eschewed Chicago for Brooklyn, is canceled. (Bill Pearis for BrooklyVegan)

We have anything that you’d find at a New York bodega, turned vegan,” – Jeremy Dean, owner of the newly opened Vodega in DUMBO. I know where I’m going this weekend. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Remember gyms? Governor Cuomo says you won’t see a gym open in New York anytime soon. (Nick Reisman for NY1)

That won’t stop everyone, as some gyms like BYKlyn Cycle in Park Slope (of course, it’s Park Slope) opened a pop-up outdoor spinning studio. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Everything you need to know about the NYC quarantine checkpoints. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Where to eat outside in Greenpoint. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

While the mayor didn’t come out and directly support a tax on the city’s mega-rich, he went as far as to say that he won’t cater the city’s policies around trying to lure them back. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

List: Recent restaurants and bars that closed, including Jack the Horse Tavern in Brooklyn Heights, 88 Lan Noodle in Chinatown, Fonda in the East Village, and more. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The MTA is expanding its program of putting cameras on buses to ticket drivers parked in bus lanes. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The 8 rooftops now open with the best views of NYC. (Bao Ong for Time Out)

There has been a years-long fight to grant Ezras Nashim, an all-female Orthodox volunteer emergency medical service and focus of the documentary 93 Queen, an ambulance license. They have been using their own vehicles to respond to emergencies and were denied a license last summer due to objections from the Hatzalah emergency medical service. Within the Orthodox community, modesty is a real issue, and women can be forced to make a choice between their modesty and a real medical emergency. That is a position that no one should have to be in. Women are not allowed to join the Borough Park chapter of Hatzalah, exacerbating the issue. (Carson Kessler for The City)

Are NYC schools ready to handle students and teachers? Here’s a better question: Do their HVAC systems work at all? (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

On its 100th birthday the Wonder Wheel stands silent. (John Freeman Gill for NY Times)

A guide to the city’s food halls that have reopened for outdoor dining, takeout, and delivery. (Erika Adams for Eater)

The Briefly for May 30, 2019 – The “I Don’t Have to Talk to You” Edition

Transgender activists will get a monument, a prison may become luxury apartments, this week’s commute from hell, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The city is getting safer, but pockets of Brooklyn are seeing spikes in violence. Is gang activity to blame? (NY Times)

“I don’t have to talk to you.” Why did Brooklyn Community Board 1 buy that $26,000 SUV? It doesn’t matter, because now the story is about Community Board 1’s district manager Gerald Esposito’s outburst when questioned about it at a board meeting this week. (The City)

One of the benefits of going to school at NYU is that you also get to live in one of the country’s most expensive rental markets. Oh what, that’s not a benefit. (Patch)

The Staten Island Wheel is the city’s zombie project. Now that it’s been dead for months, the city’s Economic Development Corporation is meeting with a new developer to work on the 630 foot tall Ferris wheel. (6sqft)

Electric scooters are still illegal, but rent-by-the-minute mopeds have arrived in Long Island City, Astoria, and multiple Brooklyn neighborhoods. (LIC Post)

We have the mayor mayor, the night mayor, and soon we may have the bike mayor. (Streetsblog)

If you’re a fan of events like The Squirrel Census, the Great Fish Count is looking for volunteers across the city. (6sqft)

Is this pole dancing rat the work of the enigmatic Zardulu? (Gothamist)

More on Zardulu. (Reply All)

In a move that seems too perfect for the nightmare dystopia the city’s real estate has become, a former prison in Harlem may soon become a series of luxury apartments. (The Root)

A guide to the city’s only observation decks. An easy guide because it comprises of all of them. (Curbed)

The “mechanical void” loophole has officially been closed by the city council. The short version of it was that developers were adding mechanical space in the middle of buildings to get around zoning laws to make the upper floors of their buildings as high as possible. (Curbed)

Three men were found guilty of “a sort of insurance fraud on steroids” that made them $31 million richer until they were caught. (Gothamist)

This week’s commuting hell belongs to 79th St, where the MTA closed all but one exit, causing overcrowding and five trainloads of people unable to leave the station. (Gothamist)

A few weeks after City Hall transferred city-owned land in the Bronx to a developer and approved $12 million in financing for an affordable apartment complex, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s political action committee received a $25,000 donation. (The City)

Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, pioneering transgender activists who were at the vanguard of the gay rights movement, will be immortalized in a monument that may be placed down the street from the Stonewall Inn. (NY Times)

Netflix’s mini-series on the Central Park Five is released on Friday, and with it will bring a flood of stories about the men at the center of the controversy and how they were targeted, hated, and abused by the city they called home and more specifically Donald Trump. (NY Times)

First, it was Trader Joe’s and now Whole Foods is following suit. 8 of the city’s 12 Whole Foods will stop making deliveries outside of what they refer to as the “walking zone” near their stores and are pushing customers to otherwise use Amazon’s ‘Prime Now’ app instead of visiting the store at all. (Tribeca Citizen)

Where to eat, but mostly where to avoid, at Hudson Yards. (Eater)

Governor Cuomo does not have any plans to lighten his grip on the state and just started his third term. He announced plans to run for a fourth term in office. The last governor of New York to serve four complete terms was George Clinton, New York’s very first governor in 1777. (Patch)

Katz’s is having a ‘When Harry Met Sally’ fake orgasm contest on the 30th anniversary of the film’s release. If you’ve been training for this your whole life, this is your moment. (Eater)

40 ideas for a birthday party for an adult. Calling it an “adult birthday party” sounds like it involves pornography. (Grub Street)

Can we have one week without someone intentionally trying to sabotage the subways? (Gothamist)

Tourism is up in the city and has taken Broadway’s box offices with it. 2018 was the ninth straight year of growth in the number of tourists, who make up 63% of the total 14,768,254 people attending Broadway shows, paying $1.8 billion for tickets. Other factors in Broadway’s growth include longer running shows, a wider variety of shows and a higher volume of them as well. And Hamilton, which grossed $165 million in ticket sales. (NY Times)

Infinity in a Tiny Room is an art show that takes place in an apartment, and no, this is not in Bushwick. (Patch)

The best Thai restaurants in New York. (Grub Street)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.