The Briefly for November 26, 2019 – The “Star Wars, But With A Heavy Bronx Accent” Edition

Where to eat at the city’s airports, National Grid ends their gas moratorium, Governor Cuomo accused of targeting the Working Families Party, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Queens DA-elect Melinda Katz named her 31-member transition team. (QNS)

A WELCOME sign has fully replaced the Watchtower sign on the Brooklyn waterfront. (Curbed)

This week is crunch time at the city’s Food Bank. (NY Times)

C-3PO himself, Anthony Daniels, claims that the robot is supposed to have the accent of a “used-car dealer form the Bronx” as originally envisioned by George Lucas. Yikes. (Welcome2TheBronx)

A mural celebrating video game streamer Daniel Desmond “Etika” Amofah was unveiled in Bushwick. Etika took his life in June and in a video before his death had said he was worried the world was going to forget him. (Bushwick Daily)

After the Coast Guard grounded over 20 ferries that service the city for safety problems, Monday morning’s commute was as chaotic as you might imagine for the 32,000 daily ferry commuters. (NY Times)

A new kaleidoscopic art installation, called Ziggy by the firm Hou de Sousa, is open at Flatiron plaza. It’s made from 27,000 feet of rebar and iridescent cord and is a part of the “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer” programming. (6sqft)

Dunkin Donuts is killing its styrofoam cups and Grub Street has a few suggestions with what you can do with all those cups you’ve been hoarding. (Grub Street)

Thanksgiving dinner is not uncommon, unless it’s on the L train. (Jezebel)

In the battle of Governor Cuomo vs National Grid, National Grid blinked and will end their gas moratorium. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

With Bloomberg in the presidential race, all varieties of comparisons to Trump become fair game and lo, here is the first from The Real Deal, comparing Trump and Bloomberg’s personal real estate. (The Real Deal)

A look back at Bloomberg’s education record while he was mayor. (Chalkbeat)

Photos: Netflix turned back time in Little Italy over the weekend to promote “The Irishman.” (Gothamist)

Photos: More from Netflix’s “1975” Little Italy. (Grub Street)

The Nets have a new jersey, temporarily dropping the Brooklyn name in favor of Bed-Stuy, accompanied by the colors of the Boogie sweater made popular by the Notorious B.I.G. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Poly Prep Country Day School in Bay Ridge is being sued again for past instances of sexual abuse by a student who claims that the school protected his abuser, a priest and former teacher. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Here’s how the city is planning to handle its “zombie home” problem. (Curbed)

It’s official, Netflix is saving the Paris Theater with a long-term lease on the space. (NY Times)

The MTA is planning to reconstruct the existing Jamaica Bus Depot in 2021 and has no plans to address the parking situation, which has resulted in the storage of city buses on public streets. 18 elected officials in Queens sent a letter to the MTA urging the MTA to make room for indoor parking for buses to cut down on noise and pollution. (QNS)

Curbed’s holiday gift guide for people who love NYC. (Curbed)

Eater’s holiday gift guide for NYC gifts. (Eater)

PureWow’s gifts for New Yorkers that they will love. (PureWow)

For those who don’t want to leave the Upper West Side, here’s a gift guide while staying in the neighborhood. (I Love the Upper West Side)

A list of all of the shipping deadlines to get your mail to wherever it needs to go before Christmas. (Patch)

The MTA is happy to give you the details on its $51.5 billion capital plan, including $3 billion from the city, just as soon as it’s approved and fully funded. (amNewYork)

The mayor signed the bill banning the sale of foie gras into law. The ban goes into effect in 2022. (amNewYork)

Video: Macy’s revealed its holiday windows with this year’s theme “Believe the Wonder” (Viewing NYC)

Voting in New York will be simplified at the expense of third parties. The Public Campaign Financing Commission voted that for political parties to maintain a line on the state ballot, they must either draw 2% or 130,000 in the general election vote for governor or president every two years. The biggest impact this will have is to wipe the Working Families Party off the ballot. Critics point at this as the governor utilizing his power to kill the WFP. (NY Times)

Every year a warning goes out about an algae bloom in the lakes in the city’s parks that is dangerous or fatal to dogs. The combination of the city’s water, water depth, and heat makes for a perfect environment for bloom growth. The Prospect Park Alliance and Brooklyn College are working together on a potential solution. (Gothamist)

Where to eat at Newark Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and JFK Airport.

Thanks to Henry T. Casey for today’s featured image

The Briefly for October 9, 2019 – The “I Hope Someone Burns It Down” Edition

Alec Baldwin was scammed and the mayor is taking action, $10 million of speeding tickets in Queens, Brooklyn’s best fried chicken sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The pre-Yom Kippur Jewish tradition of “transferring” your sins to a live chicken by swinging it over your head is called kaporos. It’s a barbaric and disgusting tradition that kills thousands of chickens in the streets of Crown Heights. You’ll find people saying if you oppose the tradition you’re anti-Semitic or you’re doing the same thing to the Jewish community that Russia or Germany did by callnig for an end to the tradition. Public streets are not the place for slaughtering animals in 2019. (Gothamist)

The 2019 Miss Subways has been crowned. Congratulations are in order to Ms. Dylan Greenberg, this year’s Miss Subways. (NY Times)

One of this year’s election questions is about ranked-choice voting, here’s an explainer on what it is and a little bit on why it’s a good thing. (amNY)

A community hearing about a homeless shelter in Glendale, Queens started with a moment of silence for the homeless men murdered in Chinatown and then quickly devolved into comments like “I hope someone burns it down,” and “They should be locked away forever.” (Gothamist)

Today’s the day for all working New Yorkers have to have completed sexual harassment training at work. The law was passing in April and gave all New York state employers about six months to have it done. The state senate hasn’t had their training yet. (Politico)

The city revitalized 54-acres of wetlands on Staten Island, with the goal for the first phase being 69 acres. Nice. (Curbed)

Video: A look at the history of tattoos in NYC, which were illegal for nearly 40 years. (Viewing NYC)

The most expensive apartment in the Bronx is on sale for $4.6 Million. (Welcome2TheBronx)

NYC has seen its first vaping death. (Patch)

It’s not only mind-boggling that there are 32 pairs of bus stops less than 260 feet away from each other, but it slows down the routes to have stops that close. (6sqft)

Drivers in Queens racked up over $10 million in speed camera violations in six weeks of the program giving $50 tickets for going more than 10 miles an hour over the speed limit in a school zone. Queens accounts for more than 1/3 of the $28 million total. (LIC Post)

Skunks are common in the city, but for the first time, one has been spotted in Prospect Park. They’re harmless as long as you don’t threaten them, so welcome to our new fuzzy and sometimes stinky park-dwellers. (Patch)

Take a ride in the new Cash Cab. (amNY)

The company operating floating billboards has finally left the city, after the city and state both passed laws making their type of floating billboards illegal. (Patch)

In the dumbest series of events that lead to something good, Alec Baldwin was scammed by the guys selling tickets to boat tours of the Statue of Liberty around Battery Park and Tuesday the mayor said the city will crack down on this type of ticketing scam. If you want to go to the statue, tickets are sold in front of Castle Clinton and on the Statue Cruises website. (NY Times)

What kind of punishment would you assume killing a 10-year-old with a car while driving without a license carries? If you said “a misdemeanor with a maximum punishment of 30 days in jail,” you’re right. (Streetsblog)

Netflix is turning Broadway’s Belasco Theatre into a movie theater to show Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman for the month of November. (Time Out)

A review of Mario Batali’s biggest NYC restaurants in a post-Batali world. (Eater)

The 10 best fried chicken sandwiches in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Briefly for August 5, 2019 – The “Subway Supervillain Has Returned” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo recommended being fired, R Kelly denied bail, how trucks became Vision Zero’s biggest violators, the best lobster rolls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruption lottery winners are the 2, 3, A, #, N and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance Jr. is reviving an investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal from the Trump Organization. The investigation will be looking into if the Trump Organization falsified business records. (NY Times)

The city’s subway supervillain was back at it and was arrested for the seventeenth time for a subway-related offense. Isaiah Thompson is the man who was pulling emergency brakes on multiple subways, causing hundreds of delays. His latest arrest was for subway surfing. (NY Times)

The ten oldest parks in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The 42nd Street Shuttle will be “modernized,” which means some temporary delays and reduction of service. How modern? That’s questionable, but at the very least the trains and platforms will be ADA compliant, widened, and the cars themselves extended from four trains to six. (Second Ave Sagas)

The legal fight over the mega-development in the Lower East Side will continue on, but what started it? A 2016 decision by the de Blasio administration to classify residential buildings over eight stories “minor modifications” to the existing developments and could bypass the land review process kicked it off. The towers planned are 1,004-feet tall, 798-feet tall, 728-feet tall, and 724-feet tall, which all seems a bit more than minor modifications. (Bowery Boogie)

Daniel Pantaleo should be fired. That’s the decision that a police administrative judge came to in a Civilian Complaint Review Board case. Will he be? That’s a decision for James O’Neill, the NYPD commissioner, who can decide “no,” despite the judge’s decision. (NY Times)

Eric Garner’s family promised large protests if Pantaleo isn’t fired. (amNY)

What’s the history of the closet-sized “POLICE” building on Lee Avenue in Williamsburg? (Untapped Cities)

The total number of jobs in the city has gone up, but the total number of hours per week is down, essentially neutralizing the job gain when it comes to wages. The city’s lower than the average number of hours per week compared to the nation is an indicator of a substantial income gap that continues to widen. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio put a freeze on new licenses for Uber, Lyft and the like in a hope to reduce the number of cars on the streets and therefore reduce traffic and pollution. He also said, “We are not here to serve the corporate titans, we are here to serve the people.” Unfortunately, the aftermath of this is that cars that have licenses are rented out, creating corporate titans on a smaller scale and further reducing the wages he was hoping to save. (Kings County Politics)

Where to get fun, non-alcoholic drinks in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health has no 100-point violations, but it does include the Greenwich Social food hall. (Patch)

The Algonquin Hotel Cat Fashion Show featured outfits from Ada Nieves, and of course, there are photos. (Untapped Cities)

Why is it that when you send a piece of mail to someone in Brooklyn, but when you send it to Queens it’s sent to a specific neighborhood? There are myths about the reason and the post office can’t be fully be blamed either. It’s a bit of a mystery. (Gothamist)

An odd opinion piece from Polly Trottenberg, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, which seems to be focused on the difficulty the DOT’s job is when they keep getting sued by NIMBYs. (Streetsblog)

The country’s only floating pool is in the Bronx. fwiw, it’s floating on the East River, not in mid-air. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio is accused of using a state election fund to help his cash-strapped presidential campaign, which is a violation of federal finance laws. Law-breaking fundraising is nothing new to de Blasio. (Patch & NY Times)

Video: The Tiffany clock in Grand Central is worth $20 million, here’s why. (Viewing NYC)

R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking charges. (amNY)

He was denied bail, is being held in Brooklyn, and his lawyer claims that he is the real victim. (NY Times)

What are the most expensive homes for sale in each borough? Come on, you know you’re curious. (Patch)

Despite what this etiquette post from Gothamist says, I disagree and say it’s perfectly fine to read text messages from someone else’s screen on the subway. (Gothamist)

Last summer the water fountains on Roosevelt Island were shut off because the water they were serving up was contaminated. There is no indication that they will be functional in 2019. Pack a water bottle. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Highlighted by the recent killing of Em Samolewicz, how did large trucks become Vision Zero’s worst offenders? (Gothamist)

We need new laws that cause much more consequence if a motorist is negligent and they kill someone, even if it wasn’t their intention.” -Mayor de Blasio, responding to a question about on WNYC’s “Ask the Mayor” (Gothamist)

It is time to stop blaming cyclists for the problems on the city’s roads. (NY Times)

There are many reasons not to swim in the lake in Prospect Park, from the signs instructing you not to swim in the lake to the blue-green algae bacteria blooms that produce deadly toxins. Someone decided to give it a try anyway and he was dragged out of the lake by the NYPD and taken for psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau asks if you see additional police to “not be alarmed” as they engage in security theater after this weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. (amNY)

Gays Against Guns took to Times Square over the weekend to push for more gun control laws. (amNY)

The five best lobster rolls in the city. (Thrillist)