The Briefly for April 1, 2019 – The “Congestion Pricing is Not An April Fools Joke” Edition

Participatory budgeting is here, a look at the state’s budget, the MTA starts cleaning up elevated tracks, the NYC brunch directory, and more in today’s daily NY news edition.

Quick note: There are no April Fools articles listed today.

Late night subway work this week will affect the 1, 3, 6, D, F, N, R, and G trains. (Subway Changes)

The state’s $175 billion budget passed early on Sunday, including cash bail reforms, a new mansion tax, a plastic bag ban, a property tax cap, and congestion pricing. (NY Times)

What you need to know about the state’s plastic bag ban. (Grub Street)

What’s not included in the state’s budget? Mobile sports betting. (NY Post)

Seven takeaways from the state budget. (NY Times)

It’s time to vote in participatory budgeting! There is $35 million to spend in the 32 communities in the city and you have a say in how it’s spent, and you can vote online! (nyc.gov)

Once you’ve voted, you can submit your own idea for the next cycle, like this idea for new bike racks. (PBNYC)

With the Hudson Yards open, the city has turned its eyes towards the next railroad yard to develop in Sunnyside, Queens. (Sunnyside Post)

Say hello to the city’s newest restaurants. (amNY)

An ode to the longtime neighborhood bar and what the loss of it means for the city. (Curbed)

Citi Bike is headed to where it’s never been before: Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Add the D train to the list of trains you want to steer clear of walking underneath. The MTA announced it will start cleaning the undersides of the D train’s elevated tracks after the 7 train started raining subway parts last month. The work is starting from the Stillwell Ave station. (Bklyner)

A history of NYC’s 13 triangle buildings. (Untapped Cities)

Summer school, but this is actually interesting. Prospect Park is looking or immigrant professors, researches, and lecturers to teach their “Open Air University,” which runs from June 11 to June 30. (The Brooklyn Reader)

Summerhill, Crown Heights’ “bullet hole” bar, has closed. (News 12)

Smorgasburg is coming back to its outdoor locations and Time Out has some suggestions about what you’re gonna want to taste. Here’s the full list of vendors/a>. (Time Out)

Former Knicks star Kristaps Porzingis has been accused of rape. Porzingis claims the encounter was consensual. (amNY)

Sink your sweet tooth into Godiva’s midtown cafe, opening on April 18. (Eater)

It’s estimated 90,000 to 230,000 birds die in the city as a result of colliding with glass buildings. A proposed bill would require 90% of glass in new and altered buildings to be treated to reduce bird fatalities. (Curbed)

Inside the battle to fight off invasive species washing down the Bronx River from Westchester. (NY Times)

6sqft is hiring!

Should you wash your hands after being on the subway? No, because except Brooklyn. (Red Hook Star-Revue)

Former Assemblymember Dov Hikind is blaming a Bklyner reporter for organizing the protest against Councilmember Kalman Yeger’s comments that Palestine “doesn’t exist.” (Bklyner)

There’s at least one benefit of living in Staten Island: it only costs you $5.50 to cross the Verrazzano to Brooklyn. If you’re a Brooklynite (or anyone else), it’ll cost you $19. (Bklyner)

A deep dive into Industry City’s effect on Sunset Park and UPROSE, a decades-old community group whose goal was always to revitalize that area as a manufacturing hub. (The Indypendent)

If you have someone who always wants to go to brunch but never has an idea of where to go: The NYC Brunch Directory. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for December 18, 2018 – The “New York: Now With 100% Legal Nunchucks” Edition

Governor Cuomo lays his impressive 2019 agenda on the table, zombie raccoons are hitting the streets, a $2,000 pearl found in a meal, the most checked-out library books, and more in todays daily NYC news digest.

Shooters shoot, and Governor Cuomo is shooting his shot when it comes to the 2019 legislative agenda. (Gothamist)

First on the table is legal weed. Governor Cuomo announced 2019 is the year for legal marijuana in New York. (NY Times)

One of the loftier goals set forth by Cuomo is a Green New Deal for New York state. The goal is to be 100% carbon neutral by 2040. (Politico)

Legal pot and a Green New Deal is only a small piece of the governor’s 2019 agenda. In the first 100 days of the term he plans on launching a $150 billion infrastructure fund, a congestion pricing plan, ending vacancy decontrol, repealing preferential rent, and much more. (Curbed)

If you think that Governor Cuomo could get through a speech in public without being interrupted by Amazon protestors, you were wrong. (NY Post)

Cowabunga! New York’s ban on nunchucks was declared unconstitutional. (NY Post)

Stabbings, weddings, live music, and alcohol. A look back at the history of Hank’s Saloon, which draws lineage back to 1903, ahead of the iconic dice’s closing in January. (The Indypendent)

The city’s top 10 preservation battles in 2018. (Curbed)

Google is going to be investing $1 billion to build a new Hudson Square campus, with plans to build 1.7 million square feet and hiring an additional 7,000 employees. (The Real Deal)

Jennifer Egan, Dan Brown, Margaret Atwood, Jesmyn Ward, and Michael Wolff top off the most checked-out books in New York’s libraries. (6sqft)

Bill Murray, legend. The indomitable Mr. Murry joined Puss N’ Boots’ Norah Jones, Sasha Dobson, and Catherine Popper on stage for their annual Christmas show at the Bell House for some merrymaking. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The Fair Fares program is supposed to begin in 2019 for low-income New Yorkers, but no plans have been announced. (Gothamist)

Nitehawk Cinema opens in Park Slope on Wednesday after a $10 million renovation, complete with two bars, food, and movie theaters too. (6sqft)

The chances of finding a pearl in an oyster are 1 in 12,000, but the chances of finding a pearl worth between $2,000 to $4,000 in an oyster at the Grand Central Oyster Bar? Much higher. (Gothamist)

It’s been two years since the Four Season Restaurant’s owner Julian Niccolini pleaded guilty to sexual assault, but it took negative reviews in The New York Times and New York to actually get him ousted. (Eater)

That mysterious green goop stored in the dumpsters of the L train shutdown? It’s probably color inaccuracies in the photos. Or that’s what THEY want you to think. (Gothamist)

The Statue of Liberty protest climber, Therese Patricia Okoumou, was found guilty. (amNY)

Mandarin Ducks? Brooklyn’s had them for years. (Gothamist)

The top 10 theater productions of 2018. (Time Out)

There are multiple reported sightings of zombie raccoons outside of Prospect Park, venturing into the city’s streets. If you come across a raccoon on the street, avoid it and call 311. (Brooklyn Paper)

If you thought the NYCHA’s problems weren’t society’s problems, if the city lost 10% of its public housing, homelessness would increase 62%. (Curbed)

HOLLA🎄D TONNEL no more. (NY Post)

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The Briefly for December 3, 2018 – The “Manhattan Apartments Are So Small…” Edition

Inside the Carnegie Deli, the real reason Amazon picked NYC, the city’s “FULL SNOW RESPONSE” is ready for the next storm, the fight over the “World’s largest” menorah and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Manhattan has the second smallest apartments in the country. At 733 square feet, they’re 22 feet larger than the ones in Seattle. The national average is 904. (The Real Deal)

Have you seen Rat Rock in Morningside Heights? Despite The New York Times calling it “one of the city’s most amazing natural wonders,” it’s not much of a sight to see. (Atlas Obscura)

In a desperate attempt to not be embarrassed by a few inches of snow, the city created something called a FULL SNOW RESPONSE for when more than two inches of snow are predicted. (Gothamist)

“Fighting” Shirley Chisholm will be honored with a monument in Prospect Park as part of the SheBuiltNYC program. Chisholm championed racial and gender equality, helping the poor, ending the Vietnam War, was the first woman to run for president on the Democratic ticket, and that’s just the start. The monument will be installed near the Parkside Ave entrance in 2020. (Curbed)

Inside The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’s Carnegie Deli pop-up. (Untapped Cities)

Coney Island is lit up for the holidays for the first time in decades. (Brooklyn Paper)

There’s a basement farm in Tribeca that supplies the city’s restaurants with freshly grown herbs. (Gothamist)

The first of three hearings about how the Amazon HQ2 deal came to be will take place on December 12. (6sqft)

How hard is painting a straight double yellow line? It seems like it’s harder than it seems, based on the Department of Transportation’s handiwork on Neptune Avenue. (Bklyner)

Step back 111 years with these recently colorized photo an elephant parade in Coney Island. (Viewing NYC)

Ground was broken on a $2.8 million Queens Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Elmhurst Park last week. (amNY)

Two more Proud Boys were arrested. Kyle Borello, 31, and Jake Freijo, 26, were charged with misdemeanor riot and attempted assault charges. The Proud Boys are a SPLC designated hate group and the FBI classifies it as an “extremist group with ties to white nationalism.” (Gothamist)

The Strand is fighting against landmark status. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

At least eight hospitals in the city were caught by Attorney General Barbara Underwood’s office for illegally billing sexual assault victims for rape kits. (Gothamist)

How two menorah’s that are the exact same height are fighting for the title of “world’s largest.” (6sqft)

Everything you need to know about the Times Square New Year’s Eve ball drop without actually having to go to Times Square. (StreetEasy)

12 Hannukah specials in city restaurants. (Eater)

Taxi prices will go up in January and the city is looking to level the playing field by passing legislation that forces Uber and Lyft into a comparable price hike. (NY Post)

As if things couldn’t look worse for the NYCHA, an executive’s secretary was arrested after finding 1,800 sleeves of heroin in her apartment. (NY Post)

The 23rd St F/M station has re-opened and features a set of colorful William Wegman Weimaraner mosaics. (Gothamist)

The real reason Amazon picked Long Island City for HQ2. (CityLab)

Meet the Staten Island lawyer accused of creating fake social media profiles to sway local elections. (NY Times)

The Verrazzano Bridge is already the most expensive bridge to cross in the nation before the MTA raises the price by $2 in March. (NY Post)

Are you the butterfinger who dropped your engagement ring down a grate while proposing in Times Square? The NYPD found your ring and is looking to give it back. (NY Post)

Brooklyn Bridge Park’s The Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory may be shutting down. Their license is up with the city and the city is looking for new proposals. (NY Post)

Orthodox Jewish parents have to balance their concern about a lack of a proper education their children may get at yeshivas with how they may be shunned within their own communities. (NY Post)

Watch Ryan Seacrest go on a painfully awkward pizza tour of the city. (Live with Kelly and Ryan)

After its second weekend, Winterfest continues to disappoint. Organizers sold tickets to attractions that didn’t exist, vendors have begun to pull out, and the Brooklyn Museum has publicly stated their disappointment. (NY Post)

It would seem wrong to hold the New York State Yo-Yo Contest anywhere but Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

17 comforting places to get hot pot. (Eater)

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