The Briefly for March 26, 2020 – The “Plenty of Dogs and Cats to Adopt” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Elmhurst hospital is overwhelmed with COVID-19, Jumaane Williams calls for full lockdown, the MTA is losing $125 million a week, and more

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Today – Low: 47˚ High: 54˚
Clear throughout the day.

PDF Guide: Know Your Rights Guide for Transgender New Yorkers Navigating COVID-19 (Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund)

The only beds we’ve been able to free up are people who have died.” Elmhurst Hospital in Queens is the center of NYC’s COVID-19 crisis. (Yoav Gonen for The City)

Video: The Times spent 72 hours following an emergency room doctor at Elmhurst hospital. (Robin Stein and Caroline Kim for NY Times)

A heartbreaking plea from Rachel Sobolev, an emergency medicine resident in the city, begging the president to take this pandemic more seriously. (Rachel Sobolev for HuffPost)

No matter what you read, New York City is not running out of pets to adopt. The Bloomberg story was changed after publication, and probably after most people read it, to say that it was referring to foster animals. There are still plenty of animals that are looking for a forever home. (Hilary Hanson for HuffPost)

If you’ve ever wondered why it seems to take forever for the city to do anything, here’s a perfect example. The city has been in the process of installing a protected bike lane on Sixth Ave for seven years. Community Board 5 requested a study in 2013 and approved the design in 2015. What’s the holdup now? The Department of Transportation wants another approval from CB5. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

Governor Cuomo said on Wednesday that we may have made incremental progress on slowing the wave of coronavirus cases. This is not a reason to celebrate or to stop creating physical distance between you and anyone else, but it’s a sign that some of our shared sacrifices might be working. (Ben Verde for Gay City News)

New York, you’ve got the rest of the week to prove to the mayor that you can use playgrounds responsibly or he will close them all. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

Photos: New Yorkers are not good at physical distancing. These are the people to blame. (Ben Yakas and Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Between Hicks and Henry Streets in Brooklyn Heights, you’ll find Love Lane, the city’s possible original “Lover’s Lane” dating back to the 1800s. (Atlas Obscura)

From the discovery of dendritic cells to the cure for tuberculosis, 10 medical discoveries made in NYC. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

A second Trader Joe’s was temporarily closed this week after a staffer tested positive for COVID-19. The closure of the Soho store will last at least three days while the store is sanitized. The Union Square store closed temporarily on Sunday and expects to reopen on Saturday. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Whole Foods is limiting the number of customers in its stores to 50, causing some mega lines outside the East Houston St store. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

A look at Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman in the United States to receive a medical degree who created the first hospital run by and for women on Bleecker St. (Harry Bubbins for GVSHP)

Remembering the Happy Land social club fire of 1990 and how it changed New York. (Allison Gilbert for NY Times)

The Trickle Up” is a streaming service from performer and playwright Taylor Mac that charges subscribers $10 per month to access original performances from 50 different artists, with proceeds going to artists struggling financially. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The FDA approved a new potential COVID-19 treatment that takes blood plasma from people who have recovered from the virus and transfuses it into people suffering from the disease. The New York Blood Center will be the first in the country to collect blood for the treatment. (Grant Lancaster for amNewYork Metro)

Subway ridership is down 87%, buses are don 70%, Metro-North is down 91% and the LIRR is down 71%. The MTA is estimating its weekly losses at $125 million a week and that the federal bailout’s $4 billion might not be enough for the MTA to survive. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

A Piece of Work” is a podcast tour of collection highlights at the Museum of Modern Art hosted by comedian and actor Abbi Jacobson. Listen, when it comes to “understanding” modern art, I’ll take all the help I can get. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Going through this crisis is enough, but imagine going through a divorce right now on top of everything. (Hannah Ingber for NY Times)

Photos: What life is like for a delivery person. (Ryan Christopher Jones and Amber Jamieson for BuzzFeed News)

With defendants accused of crimes now facing judges by video because of the coronavirus pandemic, the city’s court system no longer has a way of supervising the vast majority of suspects being released back into their communities. One of the many messes that COVID-19 is making that we’re all going to have to figure out how to fix after it’s over. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

We’re still early in the crisis and there are thousands of hourly workers across the city running out of time and money for multiple sectors of the economy that were abruptly shuttered. (Sydney Pereira and Danny Lewis for Gothamist)

RIP Terrence McNally, a playwright whose accolades and body of work is beyond what I could summarize here. (Andy Humm for Gay City News)

The city is sending homeless shelter residents and public hospital patients with coronavirus to hotels and officials aren’t providing hotel staff or the city employees monitoring the infected guests with protective equipment — instead instructing them to maintain social distance. The homeless shelter residents is a change in policy, prior to this they were sending them back to shelters. (Greg B. Smith for The City)

Jumaane Williams, the city’s public advocate, is advocating for a “full lockdown” that would close parks and construction sites and ban New Yorkers from leaving their neighborhoods except for essential work. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Where to get pizza delivery in NYC. It’s a little light on suggestions in the outer boroughs, but it’s fun to remember when we used to be able to go places to do things. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thank you to Lily from Hellgate Farm for today’s featured photo, which is allowing me to relax for a moment if I stare hard enough at it.

The Briefly for March 11, 2020 – The “Bill de Blasio’s Kiss of Death Endorsement” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The latest with COVID-19 in NYC, the five best cheese dishes in NYC, the Sunnyside Yards project is still decades away, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 55˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

10 City Island restaurants worth the trip to the city’s remote New England town. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

Photos: Rockaway’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

Bob Dylan was added to the summer lineup at Forest Hills Stadium. Tickets go on sale Friday for the July 8 show. (Emily Davenport for amNewyork Metro)

Mayor Bill de Blasio, with nothing better to dedicate his time to, has taken to Twitter to attempt to sway Elizabeth Warren to support Bernie Sanders. I called de Blasio’s February 14th endorsement of Bernie Sanders a “Kiss of Death” and less than a month later FiveThirtyEight is giving Sanders a 0.1% chance of winning the Democratic nomination. (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

Guardian Angels founder and WABC talk-radio shock jock Curtis Sliwa says he plans to run for mayor as a Republican in 2021. (NY1)

StreetsPAC endorsed Council Member Costa Constantinides for Queens borough president. Election Day is March 28. (Streetsblog)

If you’ve been waiting to see To Kill a Mockingbird, West Side Story, The Lehman Trilogy, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, and The Book of Mormon, now may be your time. Each show is offering $50 tickets through the end of the month. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

The best restaurants in Elmhurst. (Hannah Albertine & Bryan Kim for The Infatuation)

A deep dive into how a 40-year-old law has blocked police transparency in New York. For the fifth year in a row, the state’s legislature is considering a repeal of the law, with near-universal support outside of police unions. (Nick Pinto for Gothamist)

If you aren’t tired enough of hearing about the 2020 census, the Department of Sanitation is using Oscar the Grouch to encourage us to participate. Please participate in the census, especially if it means not enduring more of this kind of advertising in ten years. (Emily Davenport for amNewYork Metro)

Today marks the start of the Colossus Festival, which is bringing over 200 shows and hundreds of bands to the city. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Do you know the difference between a legal dollar van and an illegal one? Public Advocate Jumaane Williams is pushing riders to educate themselves. Hint: Not having a NY license plate is a good indication it’s illegal. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The curious case of the disappearing bike lanes in Bay Ridge. (Christopher Robbins and Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Sunnyside Yards project “is not something that would happen overnight.” according to the director of the project. He clarified that it is more likely a “multi-decade plan.” (Christian Murray and Michael Dorgan for Sunnyside Post)

The Strand on the Upper West Side is eyeing an April opening date. (Sara Lewin Lebwohl for I Love the Upper West Side)

The reason more pedestrians and cyclists are dying on the city’s streets is straight forward. Drivers are killing them. (Emma G. Fitzsimmons for NY Times)

Robert Sietsema’s top five cheese dishes around NYC. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)


As of this digest’s publication, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade is still scheduled to happen, but the NYC Half-Marathon was canceled. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

SARS, Swine Flu, Ebola, Zika, and Measles. NYC’s recent history of fighting outbreaks. (Zijia Song for Bedford + Bowery)

When will the mania end? Costco has ended their free samples policy due to COVID-19. (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

If any New York state student or staffer tests positive for the new coronavirus, their school will close for at least 24 hours.That the edict from Governor Cuomo. (Reema Amin for ChalkBeat)

A list of schools across the city that are closed or running under altered schedules. When you read this, it may already be out of date. (QNS)

The Department of Education is telling parents not to attend parent-teacher conferences. They will instead be conducted on the phone. (Zachary Gewelb for QNS)

A note from the President and CEO of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce. (Randy Peers for Brooklyn Eagle)

Dim sum parlors East Harbor Seafood Palace, Bamboo Garden, Park Asia, and Affable in Sunset Park have all closed as a result of COVID-19 related declines in business. Dims um parlors are being hit hardest because of their large rooms and communal tables. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The state’s Attorney General Letitia James has begun sending cease and desist orders over price gouging of hand sanitizers and disinfectant sprays. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

While real estate seems to be unaffected by COVID-19 fears, it’s still too early to tell according to experts. If a pandemic can’t help you find somewhere cheap to rent, nothing can. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

If reading about the coronavirus in this digest (and everywhere else) isn’t enough for you, the city introduced a text line for updates. Text COVID to 692692 and you’ll get texts from the city about the outbreak. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Thanks to reader Alex for today’s featured photo from Edge NYC’s sneak peek in the Hudson Yards.

The Briefly for February 27, 2019 – The “Paying For The Subways With Legal Marijuana” Edition

Jumaane Williams is the city’s new Public Advocate, Cuomo and de Blasio are working together on the MTA, NY moves to decriminalizing sex work, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Governor Cuomo and Mayor de Blasio unveiled a 10-point plan for MTA reform. Reorganize the MTA, congestion pricing, fare hike caps, MTA board appointments that end with a mayor or governor’s term, crack down on fare evaders, an audit, a new Regional Transit Committee, the Columbia and Cornell experts will return, expedite Andy Byford’s subway action plan, and the governor and mayor will actually have to work together. That last part is the most unrealistic. (Second Avenue Sagas)

Once marijuana is legal, a portion of the taxes will go towards funding the MTA under the ten-point plan. (NY Post)

Who doesn’t want another boozy Taco Bell in the city? Brooklyn Heights’ community board. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Jumaane Williams is New York City’s new Public Advocate. (NY Times)

Watch Public Advocate Elect Jumaane Williams’ post-election speech. (@JumaaneWilliams)

The NY Islanders are expecting a new $1.18 billion arena for a 2021 opening, but State Senator Leroy Comrie is a member of the Public Authorities Control Board and won’t allow the project to move forward unless concessions are made. We have ourselves a new Amazon-style showdown. (Gothamist)

Therese “Patricia” Okoumou, the woman who climbed the Statue of Liberty last July 4, pulled a similar stunt in Austin, TX. Federal prosecutors asked a judge to revoke her bail. (NY Post)

How much do you need to earn to think about buying a home in NYC? $105,684.33. (Patch)

New York is a baseball state. Soon it may be the law. (amNY)

After $773 million over four years, Mayor de Blasio has pulled the plug on his Renewal turnaround program, which hoped to turn around the city’s 100 lowest performing schools. Unfortunately the new program looks a lot like the old one. (Chalkbeat)

If you love combined sewer overrun, this is the perfect Twitter account for you. (@combinedsewers)

The first eight months of last year, there were 934 schools in the city that had critical health code violations, the kind that would shut a restaurant down. Mice, roaches, flies, mold, and rats. (NY1)

The barnacle Citi Bike likely spent time in the Hudson River, but it’s more fun to believe that the last rider was Aquaman. (Gothamist)

The only good left on the internet is the “Bag Dogs” Instagram account. (Gothamist)

File is under the city’s nightmare file. A man fell down an elevator shaft from the third floor in SoHo and survived. (Gothamist)

Stop feeding the animals in city parks before the City Council makes it illegal. (amNY)

The NYPD still doesn’t know who shot and killed Detective Brian Simonsen in a robbery turned friendly fire in Richmond Hill, Queens. (amNY)

Community Board 3 approved naming the Northeast Corner of 79th Street and 37th Avenue after State Senator Jose Peralta, who died unexpectedly last year. (Jackson Heights Post)

10 historical buildings in Gowanus at risk of demolition. (Untapped Cities)

The city’s compost is potentially worth $22.5 million annually, but we are literally trashing it. (Patch)

State Senators Jessica Ramos and Julia Salazar and Assemblymember Richard Gottfried introduced a series of bills to decriminalize sex work in New York. As Ramos puts it “Ultimately sex work is work.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Where to go after you delete Tinder in frustration. (The Infatuation)

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