The Briefly for August 12, 2019 – The “LaGuardia Airport: A Hellhole of Hellholes” Edition

Zombie homes, free subways and buses on holidays, the ultra-rich New Yorkers funding Trump’s campaign, the Islanders are leaving Brooklyn, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s planned late-night subway disruptions are extensive, double-check the trains before staying out late. (Subway Weekender)

The second phase of the Hudson Yards construction involves something pretty common to NYC: delays from the MTA. (6sqft)

A history, explanation, and timeline of the LaGuardia construction. (amNY)

Saying LaGuardia Airport sucks in 2019 is underselling the sheer nightmare that is trying to escape the city from an airport where 90% of people are using private transportation to get to. Thursday’s disaster scenario of people walking on the highways and ramps to catch their flights was blamed on it being of the 45 peak travel days for the summer. Between the MTA’s stellar track record for buses, the Port Authority’s control of the airport, the DOT’s control of the roads and individual airlines’ construction on terminals, this is a problem that will persist for years.

Where’s the governor on all of this? He’s called this whole mess “unavoidable,” while also taking no specific action to make traveling to the airport any less hellish. If you’re traveling on any of the 19 “peak” days in August, the Port Authority suggests leaving multiple hours earlier to account for the travel disaster waiting for you. (Gothamist)

The “zombie homes” in Sheepshead bay are becoming a real problem for the neighborhood. (Brooklyn Paper)

New York state has a case against ExxonMobil for misleading its shareholders by lying about knowledge of climate change as early as 1977, and now the state has caught ExxonMobil attempting to intimidate the witnesses. Opening statements are scheduled for October 23. (Inside Climate News)

If you’re the type of person who hates having money and loves martinis, maybe The Algonquin Hotel’s $10,000 martini is for you, which comes with a diamond ring. (Untapped Cities)

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade replaced animals from the Central Park Zoo with balloons in 1927. The company turned to Greenwich Villager Tony Sarg to create the first iconic balloons for the parade. (GVSHP)

Incomplete data and sporadic surveys make measuring storefront vacancies difficult, but a study from the Department of City Planning shows the problem doesn’t exist everywhere in the city. Jackson Heights has the lowest vacancy rate of the areas surveyed at 5.1% compared to Canal Street, which is at 25.9%. (Curbed)

The history of how a natural gas pipeline turned into a 30-mile offshore windfarm. (The Indypendent)

This week’s forced restaurant closures do not disappoint with two different places being closed by the Department of Health, both scoring over 100 violation points in the process. (Patch)

The worry over rentable Revel scooters in Brooklyn and Queens is just that, worry. The company’s mission enjoys rare support from both the Department of Transportation’s Polly Trottenberg and Transportation Alternatives, and if they proved to be dangerous, you’d be reading about the danger they pose to pedestrians in The Briefly on a regular basis. (NY Times)

These are the city’s top high schools. (Patch)

The city is transforming two East Harlem lots into all below-market-rate apartments with 30% set aside for the homeless as part of the East Harlem Housing Plan. (Curbed)

Does no one ride the subways on major holidays because the MTA cuts service or does the MTA cut service because no one rides the subways on holidays? City Councilmember Justin Brannan will propose a non-binding resolution to request the MTA offer free subway and bus service during New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day in a similar fashion to how parking meters are suspended on those days. The MTA is, of course, against anything that would promote more people to take the train or buses. (6sqft)

85% of people stopped for mass transit fare evasion are black or Latinx, which echoes the unmistakable racist enforcement of stop and frisk. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Islanders are getting a permanent home in Belmont Park with a 19,000 seat arena for the team is dead last when it comes to attendance figures for the last two seasons. (QNS)

A list of the 1% of the 1% of New York City that is fueling Trump’s reelection campaign. Of course, the city’s worst musician and Knicks owner James Dolan is on the list. (Gothamist)

The condo board of 25 Central Park West is asking neighbor buildings for money to continue to fight their lawsuit against a protected bike lane that could have saved the life of cyclist Madison Lyden. (Streetsblog)

Mike Chen is testing the six top burgers in the city, which will come out ahead? (Viewing NYC)

Already tired of the 2020 primary race among Democrats? Here is a list of possible 2021 hopefuls for NYC mayor. (amNY)

As Sunset Park becomes more popular thanks to a gentrifying neighborhood and Industry City, Third Avenue’s dangers become more pronounced. The death of Em Samolewicz is one of eight fatalities and 2,000 injuries on Third Ave since 2011. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A judge issued a stay and once again blocked the 14th St busway from becoming a reality. Every single headline about this story has used some variation of the phrase “slams brakes on” like it was legally mandated. (Downtown Express)

29% of the 15,500 structural components at subway stations were found to be worn or damaged, and that number is up since 2012. Comforting, right? (amNY)

Anti-ICE protestors shut down the West Side Highway at 26th St on Saturday for an hour. (Splinter)

Were you among the 10,253 people treated by the FDNY between 2011 and 2018 whose personal information, including social security number, was accidentally left on a hard drive and misplaced? (amNY)

The New York Philharmonic’s Free Fridays are returning, giving away tickets to people between 13 and 26 with an online reservation system. (I Love the Upper West Side)

Jeffrey Epstein is dead of an apparent suicide, but the investigation into his crimes is not. The FBI and prosecutors will turn their attention to his accomplices. (NY Times)

The city’s 19th cyclist was killed by a teenage driver on Sunday in Midwood. (Brooklyn Paper)

City Hall Park is now adorned by “Estructuras Monumentales“, works by 104-year-old local artist Carmen Herrera and will be on display through November 8. (Downtown Express)

A deep look into Corey Johnson’s plans to kill the city’s car culture. (Gotham Gazette)

35 solid happy hours. (Eater)

The Briefly for July 25, 2019 – The “In-N-Out Mystery Has Been Solved” Edition

The MTA will reorganize, Amazon eyes a move in Sunset Park, the mayor will unveil a new bike safety plan, Occupy NYCHA, dog jails return, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

After 17 bicyclists have died on city streets at the hands of drivers, the mayor has decided that his Vision Zero program isn’t enough, and will be unveiling a $58.4 million bike safety plan. (NY Times)

Step inside America’s first theatrical club, The Lambs, with a photo gallery. (Untapped Cities)

Summer Streets makes its return to… the summer’s streets on Saturdays in August on Park Avenue from East 51st St to Foley Square. (Gothamist)

The In-N-Out mystery has been solved. A teenager brought four burgers back from CA and accidentally dropped one in the street. What’s the next city mystery that needs solving? (Eater)

The best cold noodles in NYC. (Grub Street)

Making weekend plans? Here are NYC’s seaside neighborhoods that are calling your name this summer. (amNY)

Eater asks: Is Per Se good again? The answer? “Sort of.” (Eater)

Gothamist is hiring a fulltime digital reporter/producer. (Gothamist)

Firstess Earth Crosby died this week after the injuries she sustained at the end of February from being run over with a truck. The driver was not issued a summons and has not been charged. She was the 59th pedestrian to die in 2019 as a result of the actions of a driver. (Streetsblog)

“Daniel Pantaleo and the other officers involved in Eric Garner’s horrific death should be fired.” Corey Johnson was able to say what our mayor was not. (The Brooklyn Reader)

The slowest Bronx bus is the Bx19 with a speedy 4.8 mph average, the most unreliable is the Bx3, which arrived bunched with other Bx3 buses 19,2% of the time. (Welcome2TheBronx)

“Why put up tin cans?” Sometimes art is too abstract for its own good. There is a backlash against a public art installation in Chinatown by residents because the abstract piece has seemingly no connection to Chinese culture. (Gothamist)

The MTA, after a 1-2 punch of being told by the governor to address the growing homeless population on the subways and learning the contractor they hired to handle homeless outreach was doing anything but, announced a href=”https://www.6sqft.com/mta-moves-to-create-homelessness-task-force-as-outreach-efforts-come-under-scrutiny/”>they will create a homeless task force that will have 30 days to create a plan. (6sqft)

The City Council passed the “Storefront Tracker” bill that requires landlords to report on the storefronts they own and rent out to better help the city understand commercial rents and how many storefronts are vacant across the city. Landlords who don’t comply within 120 days will start to be hit with fines. (Curbed)

Stan Lee Way will be coming to University Ave between Brandt Pl and @ 176 in University Heights, near his childhood home. (Bronx Times)

Remember those little air-conditioned dog jails that popped up outside grocery stores a few years ago? They’re coming back with a “pet harbor” pilot program that will allow you to put your pooch into one of these dog jails for up to an hour. (6sqft)

The state legislature failed to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in 2019. Can they get the job done in 2020? (amNY)

ConEd is only five years late on delivering a plan to help prevent power outages caused by heatwaves. (Gothamist)

Three days after ConEd intentionally cut the power to Brooklyn neighborhoods, there are still people without power. (Brooklyn Paper)

You can get a rare look inside the Little Red Lighthouse in Washington Heights this weekend. (6qft)

11 days after being shut down by the Department of Health, the Time Out Market in DUMBO has reopened. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Nothing will stop the mayor from working out in the Park Slope YMCA, not the one hour drive between Gracie Mansion and Park Slope, and not a bomb threat. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

You’re trapped inside a stalled subway train. What do you do? Here’s a guide. (Gothamist)

Don’t let stories about Amazon looking to lease one million square feet in Industry City confuse you, Amazon already leases one million square feet nearby and their contract is ending and they’re reportedly seeing what their options are. (Brownstoner)

Amelia Earhart, Greenwich Villager. (GVSHP)

Three men involved in throwing some water on NYPD officers have been arrested and charged with criminal mischief. Don’t worry, the conversation around this incident has already been blown completely out of proportion by multiple people. (NY Times)

Video: What you need to know about the 1/2/3 train switch replacement at 96th St and how it will ruin your commute. (Viewing NYC)

There will be an Occupy NYCHA rally at City Hall on Friday. Meet the women behind it. (Gothamist)

The MTA approved a reorganization that could cut 2,700 jobs from the agency, save $530 million annually, and will not help your commute. (amNY)

A look at North Crown Heights, where Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and the neighborhood supports an upzoning proposal to create new business opportunities. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

16 bubble tea shops to try in the city. (Eater)

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The Briefly for June 25, 2019 – The “UFOs in NYC Would Explain A Whole Lot” Edition

Today is election day, iconic pizzerias, the mayor’s attempts to humanize himself backfired, the YIMBYs of Park Slope fight back, and more in today’s daily NYC new digest.

Don’t forget to vote in today’s elections! (Gothamist)

Check to see if there’s an election in your district. (Poll Site Locator)

Is NYC a hotbed for UFO sightings? It would explain some of the things that we saw at the Mermaid Parade this year. (Patch)

Second Avenue in the Upper East Side has a protected bike lane, but the Department of Transportation’s version of a “protected bike lane” is some paint on the ground. The NYPD has resorted to erecting barriers to create actual protection for the bike lane from drivers, which seems like time that could be better spent doing something else if the DOT did their job right the first time. (Streetsblog)

10 secrets of the New York Historical Society. (Untapped Cities)

Another reminder about street closures during WorldPride and the 5th and 7th Ave route. (Curbed)

It wasn’t long ago that New York was a major banana port and “banana handler” was a real job title. (6sqft)

We’re #2! That is to say, we’re the second least patriotic state in the nation only behind New Jersey. (Patch)

If you’ve never built up the courage to take a ride on the swinging cars of the Wonder Wheel, this POV video is your next best option. (Viewing NYC)

A truck driver hit and killed 20-year old Robyn Hightman as they were biking on Sixth Avenue on Monday. The driver was issued five summonses and was not charged. This is the twelfth cyclist killed in 2019, where Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero remains in a crisis. (Streetsblog)

Some realistic postcards from New York City. (Gothamist)

From a distance, it looks like a jumbled mess of colors, up close it’s a passage from ‘Call Me By Your Name’ in braille using Lego bricks on Ave A between 3rd and 4th Sts. (EV Grieve)

30 Great LGBTQ Bars. (The Infatuation)

Here’s a good way to put the city’s volume of construction into perspective. Nearly half of all real estate listings in the city are within 525 feet of construction. The number jumps to 70% when you only consider homes built after 2016. (Curbed)

The best cheesecake on the Upper West Side. (I Love the Upper West Side)

The anti-homeless shelter petition in Park Slope has some competition with a pro-homeless shelter petition and the YIMBYs are nearly doubling the NIMBYs. (Gothamist)

Photos from last weekend’s Punk Island. (BrooklyVegan)

The City Council began their inquiry into the taxi cab medallion situation that has bankrupted and financially ruined thousands of cab drivers in response to a yearlong New York Times investigation. (Gothamist)

Back in April, critical GPS systems in the city crashed during a once-in-20-years event and we finally have an answer: No one upgraded the software when it was necessary. (NY Times)

Every attempt the mayor makes to humanize himself backfires. (Splinter)

Did you know that the NYPL has a movie-streaming service? Well, it’s ending on July 1, although the Queens libraries will still have an option using Overdrive. (NY Times)

A section of Mermaid Avenue in Coney Island was christened Woodie Guthrie Way on Saturday, coinciding with his son, Arlo Guthrie, taking on the mantle of King Neptune during this year’s Mermaid Parade. (Brooklyn Paper)

The city’s 26 most iconic pizzerias. (Eater)

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