The Briefly for January 6, 2020 – The “Y2K Bug Arrives in NYC 20 Years Late” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The state’s new elevator safety law, a new minimum wage for (some) tipped workers, a Times Square institution closed, Brooklyn’s hottest restaurants, & more

Today – Low: 33˚ High: 46˚
Partly cloudy throughout the day.

New York is the latest state to enact a state-wide elevator safety law, calling for state oversight of the elevator industry, establishing standards for elevator contractors, mechanics, and inspectors. Anyone think it’s weird this didn’t already exist? (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

It’s hard not to make Y2K jokes when the city’s parking meters stopped accepting credit cards on January 1, 2020. This is the second time in a year that a city’s system has malfunctioned as a result of a lack up upgrading software. (BenYakas for Gothamist)

Speaking of parking tickets, Corey Johnson is proposing a “day fine” system, which is common in Europe. Instead of a fixed fee, which unfairly burdens low-income people, fines would be representative of a percentage of a person’s daily income. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Governor Cuomo vetoed the Securing Wages Earned Against Theft bill that would have allowed employees to freeze the assets of their employer while a wage theft case is pending. (Max Parrot for QNS)

Meet Josh and Benny Safdie, the directing duo behind Uncut Gems. (Alex Mitchell for amNewYork)

Did you know there’s a secret H subway train? It was renamed to the Rockaway Park Shuttle in 1993, but it’s still out there if you look carefully. (Tribeca Citizen)

12 new public art installations not to miss in January. (Michelle Young for Untapped Cities)

The mayor’s reaction to multiple deaths on Third Avenue in Brooklyn is to lower the speed limit from 30mph to 25mph. Lowering the speed limit without enforcement is akin to doing nothing, so the mayor has also promised a step up in enforcement. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

Chepe, the Nevins Street raccoon was captured. He’ll be living out his days known as Chepe, the Prospect Park raccoon. (Jen Chung for Gothamist)

The state has a new minimum wage law for tipped workers, which doesn’t include restaurant or bar workers. (Ryan Sutton for Eater)

A look at the city’s new bail reforms from inside Manhattan’s criminal court. (Beth Fertig for Gothamist)

A deep look at why some parents are freaking out about the city’s potential scrapping of the Gifted and Talented program. (Emily Shwake for Gothamist)

Photos: Inside The Deco, Midtown West’s new food hall. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The 13-year-old arrested in connection with Tessa Majors’s murder was denied a pre-trial release. and will remain in custody while awaiting the trial. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Times Square features the ridiculous version of everything. $30 Domino’s pizzas. A Red Lobster. And the planned TSX hotel will include an outdoor stage and ball drop suites. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Say farewell to the last of the “meat honkeytonks” in Times Square, Tad’s Steaks. (Serena Dai for Eater)

The Queens Public Library on the first floor of One Court Square will be closing at the end of the month. The library’s been in that location since 1989. If you remember, the building was supposed to become Amazon’s temporary office while their Long Island City campus was built, but since the deal fell through the developer of the building is making other plans. The library is looking for a new home. (Allie Griffin for LIC Post)

A dozen illuminated seesaws are coming to Broadway today (Monday) between 37th and 38th as part of the installation “Impulse.” The seesaws will create light and make music as well. Adding an installation in that spot is an annual tradition. Last year’s installation was an illuminated tunnel you could walk through that made sounds as people walked through it. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

New York is a city of signs, but of very few sign-painters. Travis Fitzsimmons of Prospect Lefferts Gardens makes hand-painted signs whose simplicity and style catch eyes. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Pizza Paradise, the nondescript and honestly sub-par pizza place in Flatiron, holds a secret. Inside is also Taste of Persia, which will be closing at the end of the month due to being told to close by the new owners. Owner Said Pourkay is looking for a new space. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The Hells Angels’ supporters used to claim the block that housed their clubhouse on E 3rd was the safest block in the city. Some unknown gunmen tested that theory at their new clubhouse in Throggs Neck late on Thursday night. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Video: A look inside Joe’s Shanghai legendary soup dumplings. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

The process hasn’t officially begun, but parents in Queens are organizing against desegregating schools in Kew Gardens, Forest Hills, Rego Park, and Jamaica. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

The Grand Street bike lane in Brooklyn is being upgraded today to physically separate cyclists from moving traffic and prevent drivers from parking in the bike lane. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

It’s the most mulch-iest time of year. (EV Grieve)

Fairway Market is filing for bankruptcy again. (David Cunningham for I Love the Upper West Side)

The city showed its support for the Jewish community over the weekend with a nearly 20,000 person march across the Brooklyn Bridge into Manhattan. (Christina Goldbaum and Matthew Sedacca for NY Times)

Photos: Inside the new East Village Trader Joe’s. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork)

A Chinatown bus with a station on Canal Street was involved in a horrific traffic accident early Sunday morning in Southwest Pennsylvania that killed five and injured sixty. (Bowery Boogie)

How can you make finding an apartment even less fun than it already is? Add Excel and decision matrices. (Kim Velsey for NY Times)

You’ve got all week to prepare yourself. This weekend is The No Pants Subway Ride. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

In another depressing blow to sources of local news, amNewYork and Metro will be combining into one newspaper under the Schneps Media banner. It seems like Metro’s website will be eaten by amNewYork’s, which has been increasing filled using Associated Press stories instead of local reporters. The announcement doesn’t include the number of layoffs that will be involved. (amNewYork)

The hottest restaurants in Brooklyn for January. (Eater)

The Briefly for December 10, 2019 – The “MTA Gets A Taste Of Their Own Medication” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: NYC will pause sending its homeless to the slums on Newark, de Blasio’s paid vacation bill is stalled in the City Council, the best dishes, and more

Beetlejuice needs a new home on Broadway. It’s being evicted from the Winter Garden Theater on June 6 to make way for “The Music Man” starring Hugh Jackman. (Michael Paulson for NY Times)

Holiday windows you won’t want to miss. (Shaye Weaver for amNewYork)

Con Ed, who had a banner summer in New York, is raising its rates in 2020, 2021, and 2022. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

The MTA spent $600 million on 300 subway cars and only 18 arrived on time. These are the same trains that are less reliable than ones 30 years old. So not only are they providing poor service, but they’re also regularly late. Who does that sound like? (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

If you’re the kind of person who goes out of your way to avoid hearing anyone singing Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas is You,” you you’ll want to avoid the Mariah Carey Christmas pop-up shop this weekend. (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The city will suspend its program sending homeless New Yorkers to slums and condemned apartment buildings in Newark after the city of Newark filed a lawsuit in an attempt to stop the practice. (Joe Anuta for Politico)

Fire up your Instagram account, the Museum of Ice Cream is back. (Lorence Fabricant for NY Times)

Imagine the kind of SantaCon-inspired event that even the SantaCon NYC organizers feel the need to distance themselves from. Welcome to SantaCon Hoboken. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York’s most iconic Art Deco buildings, mapped. (Zoe Rosenberg for Curbed)

The mayor has tried to push his paid vacation legislation through the City Council, but despite his announcement that the city would pass it this year, it appears to be stuck in limbo with opposition from small businesses and Speaker Corey Johnson. Maybe if he spent more time being the mayor and less cosplaying as a presidential candidate there would have been a chance. (Erin Durkin for Politico)

The man who ate the $120,000 banana at Art Basel Miami Beach is Brooklyn artist David Datuna. He was not arrested for eating the banana. (Maya Kaufman and Staff for Patch)

If you’re craving more banana and duct tape art, street artist Joseph Grazi spent his weekend “creating” new works near the Essex Street Market. (Bowery Boogie)

Photos: Inside the former Coffee Shop in Union Square-turned-Chase bank. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Nightmare: Two women fell between subway cars and the train started moving at Broadway Junction shortly after midnight on Sunday. One woman died and the other is in stable position. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

7 enormous unfinished NYC infrastructure projects poised to change the city in the 2020s. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed)

Mapping the tech takeover of New York City. (Amy Plitt for Curbed)

Working in an Amazon warehouse is more dangerous than working in a coal mine, and 42 members of the City Council, State Senate and Assembly are demanding safety improvements in the Staten Island warehouse. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Infatuation’s favorite new dishes of 2019. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for December 3, 2019 – The “Jet Engine Powered Snow Blowers” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest with standing up to big real estate, the best restaurants in Crown Heights, an NYPD cop walking into a queer dance night with a Trump lanyard, and more.

A truly amazing interactive history of today’s subway map, including the history of the map, its digitization and you may learn a few things along the journey. (Antonio de Luca and Sasha Portis for NY Times)

Bill de Blasio is having an immature fit about Mike Bloomberg’s presidential run. Is it jealousy that Bloomberg’s campaign is more successful than de Blasio’s could ever hope to be or is it that de Blasio has always been petty and petulent when it comes to his predecessor? (Sally Goldenberg for Politico)

How does the MTA deal with snowstorms? Jet engine powered snow blowers. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Imagine going to see Slave Play on Broadway to interrupt a Q&A session to complain that the playwright is “racist against white people.” Say hello to Talkback Tammy. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

This was the year that New York state and city government stood up to big real estate interests and made appreciable change. The real estate industry is looking for new ways to influence governmental decisions moving forward. (John Leland for NY Times)

The best restaurants in Crown Heights. (The Infatuation)

The NRA is challenging a city law that was aimed at stopping interstate gun trafficking in the Supreme Court. A decision isn’t expected until June. (Amanda Eisenberg for Politico)

Remember last year’s HOLLAND TONNEL Christmas decoration OCD nightmare? This year’s decorations are much less cringe-worthy. (Claire Lampen for Gothamist)

Welcome to the Dermot Shea era of the NYPD. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Have you had a package mysteriously disappear from your building? You’re not alone. 90,000 packages go missing every day. (Winnie Hu and Matthew Haag for NY Times)

The “Brooklyn’s Fyre Festival” nightmare is never-ending. Arch-villain and architect of the Frozen Fare Festival Lena Romanova is suing the Brooklyn Daily Eagle for defamation for its coverage of Winterfest, the winter shitshow to end all winter shitshows at the Brooklyn Museum one year ago. Winterfest is, thankfully, never coming back. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

An NYPD officer walked into a queer dance night in Jackson Heights for an inspection wearing a Trump lanyard on Sunday. Officers are required to remain politically neutral and as a result their commander is investigating the inspection. (Max Parrott for QNS)

The homes in Ozone Park that were flooded with the city’s raw sewage have been pumped from the basements and officials are blaming the backup on a possible “Fatberg.” (Mark Hallum for amNewYork)

Stay ho ho home. SantaCon is coming. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

10 new public art installations to see this month. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Photos: The Empire State Building’s new $165 million 80th floor observatory is open. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

A first look at the new Rockefeller Center pedestrian zones. (Scott Lynch for Gothamist)

The York Street F-line station may be one of the city’s most potentially dangerous. The station serves 14,000 workers and 4,000 residents who travel through the station’s single stairwell with no escalator, elevator, or second exit. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

CitiBike’s pedal assisted electric bikes are coming back “this winter,” breaking the promise for a fall return. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

The Eater 38, 38 restaurants that define New York City’s dining scene right now, has been updated with Williamsburg’s Gertie making the list. (Eater)