The Briefly for March 3, 2020 – The “Kill it! Kill It All With Bleach!” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Inside a Bushwick arts collective, Gale Brewer accidentally violates the Civil Rights Act of 1968, the tale of two of “the city’s best” burgers, and more

Today – Low: 43˚ High: 58˚
Light rain starting in the afternoon.

A look inside Bohemian Grove, part venue, part apartment building full of artists and performers that are all paying under $1,000 rent and that is, yes, in Bushwick. (Kim Kelsey for NY Times)

Video: A POV experience going to the top of One World Observatory. (ActionKid)

An argument that restaurant letter grades, health inspections, and fines work against the public interest and instead are a great source of revenue for the city. (Demian Repucci for Grub Street)

Governor Cuomo directed NY health insurers to waive cost sharing associated with testing for coronavirus, including emergency room, urgent care and office visits. (@NYGovCuomo)

KILL IT WITH BLEACH. That the’s MTA’s plan to fight the spread of coronavirus on our buses, trains, and schools. New York will never be so clean again. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The numbers of New Yorkers infected with coronavirus will go up, but it does not mean that the virus is spreading. It means we’re identifying the people who have it already. In the meantime, cough and sneeze into your elbow, wash your hands with soap, and please stop touching your face. Are you doing it right now? Stop it. (Jesse McKinley and Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

Top 5 pizza shops in the Bronx. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

Whoops. Gale Brewer’s stated argument against the rezoning for Lenox Terrace technically goes against the 1968 Civil Rights Act. Brewer specifically says the rezoning should be stopped to prevent a decrease in the area’s Black population. Attempts to preserve racial composition of a neighborhood goes against the act, even if it the original intention was to criminalize keeping white neighborhoods white. The argument made here lays it on a bit thick, but it highlights why our politicians need to be careful when laying out their arguments. (Nikolai Fedak for New York YIMBY)

Rendering: The Waldorf Astoria’s residents-only pool, 6,000 square feet with 19-foot ceilings and a retractible roof. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

The Democratic Socialists of America have allies in City Councilmember Costa Costantinides, State Senator Michael Gianaris, and Assemblymembers Ron Kim and Brian Barnwell in replacing Con Ed with publicly owned power. (Max Parrott for QNS)

Amtrak has a new chief executive in William J. Flynn, the third in the last three years. Good luck. ((Patrick McGeehan for NY Times)

RIP Joe Coulombe, Trader Joe. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street)

A moderate Democrat drops out of the race in hopes that it ives another moderate enough of the vote to beat the Democratic Socialist at the top of the ticket. No, this isn’t about Mayor Pete or Amy dropping out of the race in hopes of stopping Bernie, this is Fernando Cabrera dropping out of the race for 14th Congressional District against Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez in hopes that Michelle Caruso-Cabrera has a better chance. (David Cruz for Norwood News)

Residents in East New York are looking to Albany to declare a cease-and-desist zone for house flippers after reporting multiple phone calls and door knocks a day from people attempting to buy their homes unsolicited. (Allison Dikanovic for The City)

A Q&A with the new Interim President of New York City Transit, where Feinberg offers no good answer as to why she supports hiring 500 additional cops with no measure of success on the job would look like for them and at the same time cutting 700 operational positions to save money. (Stephen Nessen for Gothamist)

Free rent and getting paid to explore downtown Manhattan. Welcome to the Explorer-in Chief job. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Without visible enforcement, the rules get relaxed. That’s what’s happening in Sunset Park as truck drivers are deviating from the city’s legal through streets and getting stuck in attempts to make impossible turns. The NYPD issued 16 tickets for commercial vehicles on residential streets in all of Brooklyn in January. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper)

Could this be the year the city takes decisive action to protect pedestrians against drivers? State Sen. Andrew Gounardes is sponsoring a package of bills at the state level aimed at making the city’s streets safer. You’d think the City Council would be leading the way on this, but I’m glad to see that someone is attempting to take action. (Paula Katinas for The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

A carriage horse was euthanized shortly after she collapsed in Central Park on Saturday. The incident that lead to the horse’s death was captured on video. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

Mayor de Blasio as yet to make good on his campaign promise from 2013, where he said he would ban horse carriages from Central Park on day one. A promise which earned him the support of animal rights activists over Christine Quinn in the Democratic primary. (Elizabeth Titus for Politico)

The Sergeants Benevolent Association and Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, two loudmouth organizations when it comes to bail reform, are suspiciously quiet when it comes to the case of narcotics officer Stephen Abreu, who was charged with attempted murder, criminal possession of a weapon and other charges. Awaiting a felony murder charge, he was released without bail. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Kudos to Streetsblog, who heard about the stupid campaign in Staten Island to tie yellow ribbons around phone poles to warn drivers of speed cameras, and decided to go to Staten Island to tie as many ribbons around as many poles as they could find in protest. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Mayor de Blasio ran for president and his campaign died. He endorsed Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden is seeing a resurgence. Now he’s taking his kiss of death home to Chirlane McCray in hopes that he can help make his wife the next Brooklyn borough president. (J. David Goodman for NY Times)

Scarr’s Pizza is moving, but only down the street to a larger location on Orchard St. Get your slices now so you can talk down to people waiting on line for pizza at the new location. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Sometimes you can’t pass up a sign (or two in this case) declaring the best burger in New York City. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

10 new public art installations not to miss in March. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Thank you to reader Dylan for sending in today’s featured photo from outside the Brooklyn Museum of this Leon Karssen sticker.

The Briefly for February 5, 2020 – The “Why Bother Having A Public Transit System At All?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Upper West Side asks for a study on street parking, the five best bacon dishes, the NYPD blames a jump in crime on the latest boogeyman, and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 44˚
Light rain in the morning and overnight.

A not completely accurate comic portrayal of New York’s zoos. (@pixelatedboat)

Here’s the full list of Catholic clergy accused of sex abuse in NYC. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

29 things that are regular here and weird almost anywhere else. (Mary Lane for New York Cliche)

Andy Byford’s last day on the job for the New York Transit Authority will be February 22 and advocates are starting to get worried about the MTA’s ability to move forward without him. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is seeking proposals from ride-hailing services to help service transit deserts better by adding cars to bring people to the nearest subway stop during the hours of midnight and 5am. The details are nearly non-existent, like price and what locations would be served, but it’s a start. (Jose Martinez and Trone Dowd for The City)

Transit advocates are less than impressed with the MTA’s potential plan to subsidize for-hire car rides. Rather than address a real issue with transit availability, the MTA is punting to cabs to fill in the gaps it created. How long until the MTA uses this as an excuse to further cut back on night and weekend service? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city is working on a pilot program to bring a potential 5,000 basement apartments up to code in East New York, but at the same time they are also cracking down on illegal basement apartments elsewhere. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

Robert Sietsema’s top five bacon dishes across the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

What’s the top hotel in the city? Was your pick The Lowell Hotel New York on 62nd? According to US News and Reports, it’s #1. Check out the rest of the top ten. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Renderings: Check out what the pedestrian plaza will look like outside Grand Central this summer. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Does a perfect carrot cake exist? Does it come from Lloyd’s Carrot Cake in Riverdale? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The train that lost power between Secaucus and Penn Station left New Jersey at 6pm and didn’t arrive at Penn Station until 10pm for a ride that usually takes 15 minutes. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

17 hidden gems in Flushing. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

All hail Pizza Rat, the unofficial subway mascot. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York’s tourism industry is taking a hard hit from the lack of Chinese tourists around the city, representing the second-largest foreign travelers in the world. (James Barron for NY Times)

The first person showing signs of coronavirus symptoms does not have coronavirus. The other two people showing symptoms have not been given a diagnosis. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The Knicks fired their team president Steve Mills. Whoever takes the job for James Dolan next will either become a very wealthy person or the biggest idiot in the NBA. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Kids born later in the year are up to 70% more likely to be diagnosed as having a learning disability by the city’s public schools according to a new data analysis from the Independent Budget Office. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It’s an inclusive sauna on wheels, and yes, it’s in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The NYPD isn’t supposed to talk about public policy, so why are they opening their mouths about bail reform? Oh right, because they police themselves and basically feel like they can do almost anything they want. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

January saw a 20% drop in murder, a 24% drop in hate crimes and an 18% drop in rape, but the overall volume of crime was up 17% compared to last January. The Police Benevolent Association’s Pat Lynch has decided this overall jump can be blamed on the NYPD’s latest boogeyman: bail reform. With the reforms being on the books for one month, it is impossible to make a direct connection between the two. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Incidents of slashings and stabbings in city jails surged 10.4 percent last year and physical confrontations between detainees and corrections officers rose sharply to a staggering 37 percent—and the City Council Committee on Criminal Justice is trying to find out why. (Matthew Benedetti for NY City Lens)

The NYPD is phasing out its activity log memo books in favor of an iPhone app. The books have been in use since the 1800s and the new app will centralize the information and leave less room for fudging the facts. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

22 go-to fast casual spots in the Financial District. (Urvija Banerji for Eater)

Brooklyn Bridge Park has new a public art installation at Pier 3. The large metal hoops are called “New York Clearing” by Antony Gormley and I’m going to withhold my judgement on this until I experience it firsthand, because it’s looking a little weird in the photos. (Gabe Herman amNewYork Metro)

An adult tree house is coming to this luxury Lower East Side high-rise. Of course it is. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

It took eight months, two closed-door sessions, and an hour of debate on the last night, but Community Board 7 on the Upper West Side has asked the city for a study curbside usage on the Upper West Side and explores the idea of paid residential parking permits. Eight months. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

“The usual?” 26 restaurants where you’ll want to become a regular. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for February 4, 2020 – The “NYPD’s Very Not Nice 69 Million Dollar Cost” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The race to contain the coronavirus, Cuomo may use eminent domain to renovate Penn Station, the best new restaurants in Brooklyn and more

Today – Low: 38˚ High: 56˚
Possible light rain overnight.

Is this the year that Albany passes marijuana legalization or… oh god I just can’t keep doing this. It’s been over a year with this story and every stupid pun has already been made. Up in smoke. Gone in a puff. High time to blahblahblah. Bottom line, can Albany get it done? (Peter Rugh for The Indypendent)

While the CDC is doing the testing for coronavirus, there is a team of scientists in New York racing to help contain the outbreak. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Here’s what we know about the coronavirus in New York so far. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

New York City medical labs can’t run their own diagnostic tests for the novel coronavirus only the CDC’s offices in Atlanta can run the tests and results take 36-48 hours. Mayor de Blasio is asking to change that. (Mary Frost for Brooklyn Eagle)

The NYPD cost the city a very not nice nearly $69 million dollars in lawsuits in 2019. Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

Reports of “subway surfing” increased in 2019, MTA figures show, though transit officials say the toll of those wild rides is likely even higher and deadlier than statistics indicate. (Jose Martinez for The City)

Things aren’t great for the real estate industry right now, but if you look at who’s running for mayor, things are looking worse. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Shaun Donovan, former Obama housing secretary and candidate for mayor, gets the NY Times treatment. (Aziz Paybarah for NY Times)

Are you one of the 1,128 New Yorkers that are in JR’s latest 53-foot mural in Domino Park? The mural is in conjunction with an exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, titled “JR: Chronicles.” Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

Everything you need to know about steam heat. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

The history of how the New York Public Library got its start downtown. (Andrew Berman for 6sqft)

Can art survive Long Island City’s gentrification? (Malique Morris for Queens Chronicle)

Just when the city was about to ban plastic bags, it seems that a loophole may allow stores to hand out plastic bags as long as they’re thicc. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

13 notable NYC projects designed by black architects. (Tanay Warerkar for Curbed)

Take a tour of Michelle Williams’s Brooklyn real estate empire. (Mariela Quintana for StreetEasy)

As a part of Governor Cuomo’s plans to redevelop Penn Station, he’ll need to find a way to acquire two full city blocks between 30th and 32nd and between Seventh and Eight Avenues. He could end up using eminent domain to get the land. (Eddie Small for The Real Deal)

A look at the Tenderloin neighborhood, before it was razed in 1904 to make way for the original Penn Station. (Ephemeral New York)

Speaking of Penn Station, Monday afternoon saw another commuting meltdown with only one tunnel for Amtrak and NJ Transit in operation crossing the Hudson. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 new public art installations not to miss in February. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

The award for most radical stance goes to the “Students Speak Out: Cops Out of Our Schools and Subways” protest. The students in the protest are calling for the abolishment of the NYPD, a free subway system, and a fully funded and free CUNY system. (Amanda Salazar for Kings County Politics)

Williamsburg’s East River State Park will be renamed after the gay liberation movement leader Marsha P. Johnson, the first state park named in honor of an LGBTQ person. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

The Great Canoe in the American Museum of Natural History moved for the first time in 60 years, which was a split feat of engineering and spirituality. The canoe will be the centerpiece of a newly renovated Northwest Coast Hall in 2021. (Jennifer Vanasco for Gothamist)

Minerva Zanca, a principal in Queens, just cost the city over a million dollars for being a racist. She deliberately targeted black teachers and assistants with “racist insults and retaliation.” (Jay Connor for The Root)

PETA, who has always been on the right side of morals but displaying it in the most insufferable ways, put up a sign protest the Iditarod in Seward Park. Yes, protesting a dog sledding race in Alaska by installing a sign in front of the statue of Togo in Manhattan. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

We’ve been able to assume why, but we won’t know why Andy Byford resigned without seeing his resignation letter. Release the Byford letter, you cowards! (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The Baby Yoda mural at the top of the Second Ave F stop is no more, as “Gritty City Style” has taken over the wall. (EV Grieve)

The NYPD is working its hardest to create boogeymen to overturn recent bail reforms, including leaking cherry-picked stories and statistics to the press (mostly the Post and the Daily News, I’ve stopped including any stories from the Post and the Daily News’ paywall makes it difficult for me to link to regularly). Legal experts are urging caution whenever coming across an obviously sensationalized story and give the reforms a chance to work. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

80% of Bronx subway stations will have OMNY by the end of February. (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The Parks Department is closing a portion of the Riverside Park bike trail for two months between 110th and 125th Streets for repairs and are offering no detour for bike riders. Bike riders, as you might imagine, are pissed. (Julianne Cuba)

An updated hit list of the best new restaurants in Brooklyn. (Hannah Albertine, Nikko Duren, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)