The Briefly for April 7, 2020 – The “No, We Are Not Burying Dead Bodies in City Parks” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The mayor ends his open streets program, a guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery, the hardest temp job in the city, weird things people are doing, & more

Today – Low: 50˚ High: 64˚
Light rain overnight.

Punk Island, one of the city’s best DIY and free music festivals, is postponed from its usual June date. (Andrew Sacher for BrooklynVegan)

Video: A beautifully shot montage of a barren city, titled “The New Normal Quarantine.” (Matt Chirico)

No matter what you read, the city does not have plans to bury the dead in public parks. The rumor originated by Mark D. Levine, the Chair of New York City Council health committee, who spent the entire day on Twitter walking back the mess that he created. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

The city’s official body count from COVID-19 of 2,738 is likely a vast undercount. On a “normal” day, about 20-25 New Yorkers die in their homes, but in our new reality, about 200 people are dying at home on a daily basis. Those bodies are not tested for COVID-19, so they are not listed as a confirmed case. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

City schools will continue remote learning on Passover and Good Friday this year, completely removing spring break from the calendar. (Michael Dorgan for Jackson Heights Post)

The June Regents exams are canceled. The state is trying to figure out graduation requirements since the Regents is a requirement. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

If the June Regents are canceled, does the June SAT and ACT date stand a chance? (Benjamin Mandile for QNS)

A look inside the slow collapse of the city’s catering industry. (Kaitlin Menza for Grub Street)

If you’re having trouble understanding what being six feet apart looks like, the city is installing signs showing you how far to stay away from your fellow New Yorker. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

I don’t think that when Acting Queens Borough President Sharon Lee accepted a temporary job that she’d be imagining she’d be overseeing the worst-hit county in the country with an election date that was already postponed once. (Todd Maisel for QNS)

If you’re looking for the slightest bit of good news, it seems like the growth of the novel coronavirus outbreak in New York City might be slowing down. (Ann Choi and Yoav Gonen for The City)

Three cheers to the landlords across the city choosing to not demand rent this month. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

The first jail inmate to test positive for COVID-19 at Rikers Island, Michael Tyson (not the one you’re thinking of), died on Sunday while awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

The New York Public Library and WYNC are teaming together to launch a virtual book club, the club is virtual, the book is real. The first book is James McBride’s Deacon King Kong. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

Yes, a tiger in the Bronx Zoo has COVID-19. Your pet is probably okay. Just treat them as an extension of yourself. Keep distance from other people and dogs. (James Gorman for NY Times)

Tuesday night will be a pink supermoon, climbing to its highest point at 10:35 pm. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What’s harder than finding a good one-bedroom in a great neighborhood that doesn’t break the bank? Trying to order groceries for delivery. (Serena Dai for Eater)

Your best bets for grocery delivery in the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

New York is on PAUSE through April 29, a two-week extension. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

Video: It’s a touch of history from the end of World War I in Woodhaven. The Memorial Trees were planted after the first world war and were mostly forgotten to time until a few years ago. (Matt Coneybeare for Viewing NYC)

It seems that we’re not good at staying home, according to our location data. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Maybe that’s why 311 received over 4,000 complaints about a lack of social distancing in its first week of receiving complaints. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

New York Cliché, a favorite of The Briefly, is looking for pitches and is paying for posts. She wrote a great piece about getting tickets to late-night talk shows, but then the world went to hell so I never posted it. (Mary Lane for New York Cliché)

Reimagined NYC road signs for our new lives by artist Dylan Coonrad. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

A list of NYC restaurants raising funds to feed healthcare workers. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art released a new lineup of free digital programming. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Satire: NYPD Razes Central Park Hospital Tents For Violating Outdoor Encampment Laws. (The Onion)

Performance activist Billy Talen was arrested after planting a rainbow flag on Sunday in protesting Samaritan’s Purse, the anti-gay religious group behind Central Park’s field hospital. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The mayor is ending his “open streets” program after it wasn’t popular enough to justify the heavy NYPD presence at each closed street. (Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

A running list of Mayor de Blasio’s coronavirus response missteps. (Elizabeth Kim, Jen Carlson, and Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

10 major proposals not included in the state’s new budget. #1? Marijuana legalization. (Samar Khurshid for Gotham Gazette)

What’s the weirdest thing you’ve done in quarantine? (Will Gleason for Time Out)

The pandemic guide to vegan and vegetarian delivery guide. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to Lisa Rosenblum for submitting today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for June 28, 2019 – The “These Could Be the Grossest Places in the City” Edition

Subway disruptions during WorldPride, LaGuardia’s Airtrain gets a $2 billion price tag, NYC declares a climate emergency, and more today in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The MTA promised “full service” during WorldPride this weekend. That is, of course, mostly a lie and there are disruptions on 9 subway lines this weekend. (Subway Weekender)

The city’s 53 pools are officially open! (Time Out)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s influence in the Queens DA primary was invaluable to Tiffany Caban, and since AOC won her own primary that took her to Congress, she’s learned to master Washington DC’s game on her own terms. (Politico)

No matter how gross you think the city’s public restrooms are inside of parks, you’d be making an under-estimation. (Gothamist)

The real estate industry is planning on making a constitutional challenge to the state’s rent reform laws, arguing their fifth amendment rights were violated, in an attempt o shot the case to the Supreme Court as quickly as possible. (The Real Deal)

How does the city prioritize road improvements? Take a look at the two streets recently paved in Willets Point and you might find your answer. In preparation for a film shoot, the Department of Transportation rolled out the blacktop carpet. (Queens Crap)

The City Council joined over 600 other localities around the world in declaring a climate emergencytaken its place in the Manhattan County Courthouse, thanks to the Municipal Art Society of NYC’s “Adopt A Monument/Mural” program. (Untapped Cities)

An argument in favor of the peanut butter ice being the flavor of the city’s summer. (Grub Street)

A look at the state legislature’s failed attempt to legalize marijuana through the lens of the Cuomo Catch-22. Everything is too early to talk about until it’s too late to consider. (Gothamist)

The best friend chicken in the city is on Avenue C. The top 20 friend chicken spots in the city. (Grub Street)

A fourth NYPD officer committed suicide in the last month. (Patch)

The state is waiting on the governor’s signature on a bill that would require the makers of floss, tampons, pads, condoms, menstrual cups, and other similar products (floss really stands out as the outlier in that list, right?) to list the ingredients used similar to how it’s done with food in an attempt to force companies to reduce the number of toxic materials used in their products. (Gothamist)

After the demolition of its most historic structures, what does Red Hook’s future look like? (Curbed)

Seven people were arrested in a drug bust in Bushwick that was focused on heroin being sold near an elementary school and inside of the Bushwick Houses public housing development. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

All of NYC’s Congressional delegates are asking NYC Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza to conduct lead-dust testing in public school buildings after a WNYC investigation found lead four schools. In addition, they asked for the results to be made public, and to have a plan to move students in schools where lead-dust is found. The mayor, instead of supporting their calls, is questioning the test WNYC employed. (Gothamist)

The Knuffle Bunny, a character created by Park Slope’s Mo Willems, will live in bronze statue form outside of the Brooklyn Public Library’s Park Slope branch. (amNY)

The New York Botanical Garden’s corpse flower started to open on Thursday at 2pm, so if you hurry you can still experience that “rotting meat in the sun” scent. (Gothamist)

Take a look at the designs of the LaGuardia Airport of the future that will bring it in line with “New York standards,” according to the governor. Hopefully, he’s referring to a different set of standards we have for the subways. (Gothamist)

The LaGuardia AirTrain’s cost was estimated at $450 million in 2014. In 2019? We’ve just arrived at $2.05 billion. (amNY)

The mayor stepped out of the debate in Miami and firmly planted his foot in his mouth when “accidentally” quoting Che Guevara. Now the entire country gets to feel what only city residents have felt. (NY Times)

If you’ve been outside Hook & Ladder 8 (Ghostbusters HQ), you’re seeing the remnants of Paul Rudd’s announcement that he’ll be in the next Ghostbusters movie. (Gothamist)

If you’re still stinging from being left out in the cold by MoviePass, the Alamo Drafthouse in Brooklyn is testing out a Season Pass at the cost between $20 or $30 a month. (BrooklynVegan)

There’s a small area of Bed Stuy that’s been plagued with a mysterious sound that’s been causing hangover-like headaches for more than a month. (Patch)

It’s so hot (how hot is it?) that the DOT was hosing down the Metropolitan Ave bridge because it wouldn’t close because of the heat. (Gothamist)

Video: Decoding the secret language of the city’s street signs, numbers, and letters. (Quartz)

Say hello to the baby peregrine falcons near the Bayonne Bridge who recently made their first flights. They have been given the World War II-themed names Rosie, Martha, And Juno. (Gothamist)

Google is trying to predict how crowded your subway, bus, or train will be. Even if they only ever displayed “very crowded,” it would be believable. (amNY)

A very specific list: Where to go when confronting your BFF about sleeping with your crush. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.

The Briefly for March 27, 2019 – The “Legal Marijuana is No Longer A Sure Thing” Edition

What we know about congestion pricing, two new food halls, Broad City’s NYC, coyotes in Central Park, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Here’s what we know about the proposed congestion pricing plan. (NY Times)

Midtown is getting protected bike lanes on 52nd and 53rd. The proposal has the support of Community Board 5’s transportation panel and likely have support from the full board. (Streetsblog)

Marijuana legalization appears to be in jeopardy as Albany seems to be ready to shoot itself in the foot when it comes to something that seemed like a sure thing only a few months ago. (Gothamist)

A salute to one of the city’s cheapest and possibly most delicious sandwich categories. (Curbed)

So this guy was just walking around Brooklyn carrying a loaded AR-15 rifle inside a rolling suitcase? Yup. (Gothamist)

A look inside Cipriani’s new 28,000 square foot Upper West Side food hall. (Eater)

Speaking of food halls, Time Out’s DUMBO food hall vendor list has been revealed. (6sqft)

Other People’s Trash is a vintage clothing shop run out of the back of an RV. Yes, it’s in Bushwick. How did you know? (Bushwick Daily)

The average bonus in the city’s securities industry dropped by 17% last year, but it was still more than twice the average salary in the city’s private sector. (Patch)

Bay Ridge is moving towards having its first historic district. (Brownstoner)

If you loved Rosemary’s Tavern in Williamsburg before it shut down in February, you can own a piece of it at auction this weekend. (BrooklynVegan)

The story behind neighborhood names like Spuyten Duyvil, Harlem, Marbil Hill, and more. (Streeteasy)

The New York Times wrote a love letter to itself focused around the photography of Christopher Payne, whose subject was The New York Times. (NY Times)

Central Park is getting wild. Coyotes have been spotted in the park. If you see one while looking for a hot bird, don’t feed it (duh), protect your pets, admire nature’s beauty, and then call 311 right away. (Gothamist)

Welcome to NYC Elizabeth Warren, you’re late for your train. (TMZ)

The city council is still trying to reign in the floating billboards that have been plaguing the city’s waterways. The latest attempt is a bill that will be introduced on Thursday that will quadruple the fine for violating city zoning rules. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The state is getting ready to ban plastic bags, with a possibility it will be in the April 1 budget (NY Post)

If we could all be as happy as this bag dog, the city would be a better place. (Viewing NYC)

As Broad City comes to a close, here’s a look at some of the city’s most important locations to the show. (Streeteasy)

21.9% of people who took a city bus towards the end of 2018 evaded the fare. Transit President Andy Byford wants to see police on the buses to prevent this instead of making the service something people are willing to pay for. (Patch)

If you’re craving country food in the city, this list is an answer to your southern prayers. (amNY)

Happy 20th anniversary to Forgotten New York. (Forgotten New York)

“We have solid numbers. I think part of the problem has been what people define as a solid number.” Chirlane McCray testified in front of the City Council about ThriveNYC’s seemingly lack of data that tracks the progress of its programs. (amNY)

Robert Cornegy Jr. represents Northern Crown Heights and Bed Stuy on the City Council and is officially the tallest politician in the world. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio’s control of the city’s school system will continue through the end of his term, with the state signing a three-year extension through June of 2022. (NY Post)

Unlike anywhere else in the country, New Yorkers under 44 make more than New Yorkers over 44. Just one of the ney findings from a recent survey from Streeteasy. (Streeteasy)

The Lower East Side’s Luther Gulick Park is getting a $10 million makeover that will complete by September of 2020. Gulick’s place in history stands as the man who encouraged James Naismith to invent basketball. The park will, of course, have a court. (Patch)

19 reliable first date spots in Manhattan. (Eater)

Get your photo featured or suggest stories for The Briefly by responding to this email or tagging your NYC photos and news on Instagram or Twitter with #thebriefly.