The Briefly for July 26, 2019 – The “A Green Wave is Declared” Weekend Edition

The weekend’s subway disruptions, Katz declares victory in the Queens DA recount (Cabán does not concede), a $1k meal, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This weekend’s subway disruptions are pretty rough. Rider beware. (Subway Weekender)

Breaking down the city’s “Green Wave” plan: 30 miles of protected bike lanes per year, heavier enforcement on trucks, better intersection design, the bike lane crackdown becomes permanent, and “outreach” to motorists. (Streetsblog)

Part of the problem is the NYPD, which blames cyclists after drivers hit and kill them with their cars. Here’s a video of two NYPD officers incorrectly stating that cyclists should dismount their bikes and walk when crossing certain intersections. For clarification, there is never a situation where a cyclist has to dismount their bike in order to cross an intersection. (Gothamist)

The protests worked. Warren B. Kanders resigned as a vice-chairman of the Whitney after protests singled him out after his tear-gas grenades were used against migrants at the U.S./Mexico border. This follows the museums refusing gifts from the Sackler family, the family of billionaire monsters who were behind OxyContin. (NY Times)

A look at lower Manhattan’s privately owned public spaces and the politics that are slowly turning them from actual public spaces to food halls and retail. (Curbed)

The world’s smallest cinema? The Hoxton Hotel has made a big claim about a tiny movie theater they’ve located inside their elevator vestibule. (Untapped Cities)

Heard about the DoorDash scandal but haven’t gotten the details? Here’s what you need to know about it. Also, if you have a favorite restaurant to order from, consider ordering from them directly to better patronize them. (Grub Street)

Amtrak says they’re on pace with their infrastructure upgrades at Penn Station to be completed by Labor Day, which means fewer disruptions for the Long Island Rail Road. (amNY)

A Lime electric bicycle caught fire after exploding in Rockaway Beach this week. This wasn’t a malfunction, according to the company someone tried to break the bike’s lock and instead punctured the battery, which lead to the malfunction. Yikes. (Curbed)

The city started a Residential Loading Zone Evaluation pilot program, removing parking spaces from certain neighborhoods to give delivery vehicles and for-hire vehicles a place to temporarily stop instead of double parking or parking in bike lanes, which is a nuisance to other drivers but has proven deadly to cyclists. (Streetsblog)

The history of the city’s first drag landmark: the Pyramid Club. (GVSHP)

If you thought this summer is hot, wait until the end of the century, when almost a full month of the year will be over 105 degrees without global intervention against climate change. (Patch)

On election night, it was Tiffany Cabán that declared victory and Melinda Katz that refused to concede. As the results of the recount are imminent, it’s Melinda Katz has declared victory and Tiffany Cabán has refused to concede. (amNY)

No matter the outcome of the Queens DA recount, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s reputation has taken a hit as a result of the campaign juxtaposing her point-of-view against the much more progressive Tiffany Cabán. (NY Times)

The election results won’t be certified until Tuesday, but sources put Katz’s lead over Caban at 60 votes. Next stop: court. (Politico)

Got a love of Korean food and a thousand dollars you don’t want? Atomix’s ten-course tasting meal with wine pairings will take care of you with a cost of $928 after taxes but before tip. (Eater)

The social and cultural Puerto Rican history of the East Village in the wake of the governor of Puerto Rico resigning. (6sqft)

A needed change could be coming to the city’s elections, but it has to be approved as a ballot measure for November’s elections. A look at that and the other ballot initiatives coming our way. (Patch)

This is what Manhattan’s first public beach will look like. (6sqft)

The mayor and city council are pushing for two weeks of paid vacation for every employee, small businesses are pushing back. (Gotham Gazette)

A threat of gentrification can cause stress in a neighborhood. The story of a Sean Price mural and a kosher restaurant in Crown Heights illustrates that story and that stress perfectly. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The 6th Annual Macaulay Culkin Show Summer Comedy Festival at The Bell House is bringing something to the festival that has never happened before. Macaulay Culkin. (Brooklyn Vegan)

The men who poured water on NYPD officers are facing a tougher punishment than the man whose chokehold lead to Eric Garner’s death. Why? (NY Times)

The place that gave the world rainbow bagels was seized by the state’s tax department for not paying almost a million dollars in taxes. (Eater)

Some of the city’s private schools are joining with yeshivas to fight the state’s demands that their students be taught basic English, math, and science. (Gothamist)

Who hasn’t had the dream of finding an expensive work of art in a thrift shop? A drawing in a Queens thrift shop turns out to be from Austrian Expressionist Egon Schiele and worth over $200,000. (Patch)

Eating weeds? Yup. Meet the former corporate lawyer supplying the city’s top restaurant with weeds to be used in dishes in the city’s top restaurants. (Viewing NYC)

Diving into the 40-year history of the Chinatown Ice Cream Factory. (amNY)

The most exciting restaurant pop-ups to check out, some of them end their run this weekend. (Grub Street)

Thanks to reader Lillia for the photo of Hellgate Farms!

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The Briefly for September 21, 2018 – Weekend Subway Changes, Brooklyn Promenade Might Be Closing, and More

BQE construction could shut down the Brooklyn Promenade for years, Battery Park could get a Hurricane Maria memorial, NYC’s only private island, and more in today’s NYC news digest.

Before you go anywhere this weekend, check out the changes to the subway. The 2 and M lines look to be especially bad, the L is running, the G is partially running, and the D train is sometimes an A and sometimes an F.

The Brooklyn Promenade could close for six years in order to accommodate construction on the BQE. During construction, the BQE would be elevated to where the promenade currently sits. The promenade would be rebuilt afterwards. The project will cost over $3 billion.

September 22 (Saturday) is Free Museum Day in New York, you can reserve a pair of tickets at one of over two dozen museums throughout the state.

80 Flatbush was unanimously approved by the City Council after undergoing changes to make the project smaller. The next step for the development is seeking Uniform Land Use Review Procedure approval.

One of the city’s top school districts is removing admissions standards in an attempt to diversify the student body. 55% of middle school age students in the district are black or Latino, but 81% of the students in the schools are white. Mayor de Blasio and School Chancellor Richard Carranza approved the plan, which The New York Times points out was not de Blasio’s idea.

Ten elevated parks and gardens across the city from Untapped Cities.

The cost of housing the city’s homeless population has increased. The city is spending $117 a day to house a single adult this year compared to $99 last year. A lack of permanent solutions is being partially blamed for the increase.

The Archdiocese of New York hired Barbara Jones to review its procedures for dealing with the ongoing crisis of clergy sexual-abuse allegations. Jones just finished up the Michael Cohen case two weeks ago. The archdiocese has already paid out $60 million to victims.

If you’ve got a transit nerd in your life the New York Transit Museum’s 25th annual Bus Festival in Brooklyn Bridge Park in October.

The Museum of Natural History is starting work on the new Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation despite a lawsuit by Community United to Save Theodore Roosevelt Park (CUSTR?) aimed at stopping the construction. The lawsuit states the construction would “cause catastrophic environmental damage to the area, posing a series of life threatening hazards.”

Meet the man who owns the only private island in New York City.

Police chief James O’Neill claims that the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights plans to bail out all 16 and 17-year-olds and bail-eligible women from city jails will make the city less safe.

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Citiva, is opening across the street from the Barclays Center.

Governor Cuomo’s former top aide and confidante, Joseph Percoco, will serve six years in prison for bribery.

Fake doctor sentenced for lethal butt injection.

Noted racist James Harris Jackson fatally stabbed a 66-year-old black man with a sword in Midtown last year and told the police it was “practice” for a larger racial terror attack he planned to carry out in Times Square.

What is going on at The Edna Cohen School in Coney Island? More than a week after the primary election there are no votes reported while the State Assembly primary has a 70 vote margin between the candidates.

Governor Cuomo has proposed a memorial to those lost or made homeless by Hurricane Maria in Battery Park City. The governor also announced an expansion of the New York Stands with Puerto Rico program, which sends student volunteers to work with non-profits rebuilding homes on the island.


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