The Briefly for July 31, 2020 – The “NYC Loves Until It Destroys” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: School outbreak plans, restaurant openings and closings, looking at a billionaire’s tax, where to eat outdoor brunch, and more

Today – Low: 72˚ High: 78˚
Rain in the morning.
This weekend – Low: 75˚ High: 85˚

Is it legal to sublet your apartment? Yes, but it’s complicated. (Localize.City)

Photos: If you’re looking for a unique experience when it comes to outdoor dining, check out the USS Baylander at the West Harlem Piers near 125th St, which has a dockside bar and restaurant. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

Real Estate Porn: A $3.4 million Clinton Hill house with a haunted past. (Dana Shulz for 6sqft)

Just in time for school conversations to spin up again, here’s this headline from the Times: Children May Carry Coronavirus at High Levels, Study Finds. (Apoorva Mandavilli for NY Times)

Every student in the city is going to be issued a $420 food stamp card, regardless of their income. This creates a weird dilemma for high-income families. The money on the cards is real and if it isn’t used it’s wasted, and giving the card to someone else to use is fraud. Fortunately, there is a solution. (Matt Katz for Gothamist)

The city released plans for handling Covid-19 outbreaks in schools. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Is it possible for New Yorkers to “discover” a secluded and wonderful spot without destroying it? That’s the question across the entire city. (Anne Barnard for NY Times)

Without a federal stimulus, do NYC schools have enough money to open safely? (Jessica Gould for Gothamist)

Suraj Patel isn’t ready to concede the 12th Congressional district primary to incumbent Carolyn Mahoney, despite Mahony’s 3,700 vote lead, citing 12,000 ballots invalidated by the Board of Elections. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

He survived physical abuse, homelessness, and gang violence before coming to America as a refugee, where a homeless shelter trashed his wheelchairs while Saheed Adebayo Aare was put in a Manhattan isolation hotel. (Ben Fractenberg for The City)

Looking for somewhere new and weird to explore? Check out Dead Horse Inlet and Dead Horse Bay. (Kevin Wash for Forgotten New York)

The New York Liberty has a new CEO, just like the Brooklyn Nets do. Joe Tsai owns both teams and has been taking steps to put them both on equal footing with the installation of Keia Clark as CEO of the Liberty with the eventual goal of bringing the Liberty to the Barclays Center once possible. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Interview: Amanda Cohen, the chef and owner of Dirt Candy on if the no-tipping movement can survive the pandemic. (Rachel Sugar for Grub Street)

The Department of Environmental Protection is looking to delay the Gowanus Canal cleanup from somewhere between 12 to 18 months due to declining revenues during the pandemic. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Remember when Governor Cuomo promised states that when New York was over the Covid-19 hump, he’d start sending help? Florida is the first recipient of his pledge, with the state sending gowns, gloves, masks, face shields, and hand santizer. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The state’s legislature is introducing bills to try to prevent a doomsday scenario in the city where a rise in apartment vacancies could put an end to rent regulation. Under the current laws, when more than 5% of NYC apartments are vacant, rent regulation would come to an end. Building apartments and intentionally keeping them empty or working as hard as possible to evict tenants to drive up the vacancy rate sounds like a conspiracy but I’ll never put anything past landlords. (Rachel Holliday Smith for The City)

Governor Cuomo is against raising taxes on billionaires but seems to be totally cool with raising MTA fares and tolls on bridges, essentially taxing every non-billionaire instead. (Zack Fink for NY1)

The arguments for and against the constitutionality of a billionaires’ tax. (Bill Mahoney for Politico)

June and July bring the summer’s heat, but it also brings nesting turtles onto the runways of JFK airport. Inside the annual struggle to protect the turtles in Jamaica Bay. (Lori Chung for NY1)

Even if Columbia University attempts to return to in-person classes in the call a strike by maintenance workers could halt their plans completely unless a new contract is agreed to by Friday night. (Michael Herzenberg for NY1)

With no help from the Yankees, the 161st St BID is trying to create a welcoming atmosphere around the stadium to help many of the area’s struggling businesses. (Alyssa Paolicelli for NY1)

McCarren Tennis Center’s weatherproof bubble over the public tennis courts will stay up all summer. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Greenpointers)

Only around 14 percent of state prison inmates have been tested for Covid-19 since the crisis began. I’m no epidemiologist, but that seems like a low percentage. In comparison, there has been 2.596 million tests conducted in the city, which would cover about 30% of the population. (Gwynne Hogan for Gothamist)

Tropical Storm Isaias may make landfall in NYC on Monday because things aren’t hard enough already. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

What to expect at today’s “Take Your Knee Off Our Necks” in Midtown. (NY1)

Mayor Bill de Blasio is making the New York City court system into a scapegoat for the recent surge in gun violence according to Chief Administrative Judge Lawrence Marks. (NY1)

Queens got a Black Lives Matter mural in front of the Family Court on Jamaica Avenue. (Todd Maisel for amNewYork Metro)

Get ready, because it’s ConEd blackout season. Southern Brooklyn was the first to be asked to turn down their electrical usage. (Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

Where to get takeout in Greenwich Village and the West Village. Robert Sietsema for Eater)

The MTA is installing free mask dispensers inside city buses. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Augustine in the Financial DIstrict. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Rosario’s Pizza on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

A list of the Williamsburg & Greenpoint places closed for good during COVID-19. (Bill Pearis for Greenpointers)

Farewell to Le Sia in the East Village. (EV Grieve)

Farewell to An Choi on the Lower East Side. (Elie Z Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Union Pool’s patio and taco truck are back! (Bill Pearis for BrooklynVegan)

Mott Street from Worth to Moscoe is closed off to cars and 10 restaurants all have outdoor dining with seating for over 100. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

Where to eat outside on the Upper East Side. (Hannah Albertine & Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

The best outdoor brunch spots in the city. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 28, 2020 – The “Someone Knows Your Pandemic Secret” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Please shut up, the shifting definition of “bar food,” the most checked out book from the NYPL, new restaurant openings, and more

Today – Low: 78˚ High: 92˚
Rain in the evening.

The New York Liberty and Seattle Storm have set the bar for National Anthem protests. Rather than take a knee, both teams walked off the court completely. After a 26 second silence in honor of Breonna Taylor, the teams left. Will anyone else step up or will the Liberty reign as the most badass team in NY? (Lam Thuy Vo for BuzzFeed News)

How to move a couch in or out of a small apartment. (Zachary Soloman for StreetEasy)

Our tailors know our dirty little pandemic secret. We all got fat. (Sarah Maslin Nir for NY Times)

How to get into Gramercy Park, the most exclusive park in the city, where only 383 keys exist for its locks. (Zachary Solomon for StreetEasy)

Busking is tough. Busking during a pandemic is even tougher. Now, imagine busking while carrying around a 900-pound piano. (Alex Vadukul and September Dawn Bottoms for NY Times)

An occupational therapist makes the argument that students should be learning outdoors this fall. (Lisa Raymond-Tolan for Chalkbeat)

Elizabeth Street Garden’s Executive Director Joseph Reiver offers up the Elizabeth Street Garden for schools to use. (Joseph Reiver For Bowery Boogie)

Wish the city was still open despite the pandemic? They tried keeping things open to keep up New Yorkers’ spirits. It didn’t go great for the city. (Laura Collins-Hughes for NY Times)

There’s a state law preventing public employees from striking, but NYC public school teachers are devising ways to push back if forced to teach in-person classes in the fall. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

This will be the first year that on 9/11, the names of the victims will not be read by members of their families. (NY1)

All abord the sludge boat! With Covid-19 in our poops, the boat that carries those poops away from the city is one of the most important boats in the city. (Roger Clark for NY1)

Apartment Porn: It’s $9.9 million on the Upper East Side, 5,000 square feet, nearly 21-foot tall ceilings, a 40-foot garden, and a private parking garage. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

What is food? While this is a dumb question, at this point the State Liquor Authority is making me wonder what is even food. The constantly shifting definition of what food can be served with alcohol from the SLA is maddening. Let us have our booze or don’t, but don’t make me order a sandwich with my shot. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Farewell to La Caridad 78, a Chinese-Cuban restaurant that’s been open for 52 years on the Upper West Side is closing for good. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Farewell to Le Sia, the Chinese-Cajun restaurant in the East Village. (Luke Fortney for Eater)

Farewell to the Rusty Knot in the West Village. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Farewell to Chumley’s in the West Village, two years shy of its centennial. There was an auction for most of what was inside the bar, but the auction was canceled, further confusing the situation. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Photos: A look at Saturday’s Unite NY 2020 rally with the Street Riders, Warriors in the Garden, and the Black Chef Movement, which marched from Cadman Plaza in Brooklyn to Times Square and beyond. (Emmy Freedman for Bedford + Bowery)

“New York’s recovery won’t be demonstrated by restoring the city to peak car traffic. Peak traffic never reflected New York’s full potential before the pandemic, it limited it. A car-based recovery would suck the oxygen out of the city and suffocate the city. Normal in New York is founded on the principle of independent transportation and the freedom of not needing a car to live and work in the city.”
-Janette Sadik-Khan, former NYC transportation commissioner, Why The Pandemic Represents A Historic Opportunity For NYC Streets, for Gothamist

A new memorial at the Williamsburg waterfront pays homage to almost 200 Black people who have been killed by police or have died fighting against racial injustice. (Kevin Duggan for Brooklyn Paper)

Riddle me this: When you Google “Waterbury Metro-North,” did the official MTA site read “Flirtatious Anal Dildo For Cock Hungry Blonde Slut?” (David Brand for Queens Eagle)

Will you please shut the hell up? Noise complaints are up 300% since February. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

Queens, what’s up? Why has half of Queens not responded to the Census? (Allie Griffin for Queens Post)

Maybe it’s time to address the Native American in a loincloth on New York City’s official seal? (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

This one went right under my nose. A federal judge blocked the NYCLU from releasing the NYPD disciplinary records, but on the same day, ProPublica released a searchable database of the disciplinary records. ProPublica says they were allowed to post the database because they aren’t involved in the union lawsuit challenging the release of the records. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

Twenty-seven New York City bars and restaurants on Sunday were cited by state inspectors for social distancing and other coronavirus-related violations. The state hasn’t released the list of bars and restaurants. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo is on top of the NYPL’s list of most checked out books during the lockdown. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

“They send me their keys and say, ‘Pack it up and put it in storage and we’ll figure it out later.’ There are so many people in flux.” Vacancy rates are growing throughout the city and how it could put the city’s rent regulation in jeopardy. (Greg David for The City)

19 new restaurant openings you should know about. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Lizzy for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for July 13, 2020 – The “A Summer Without Street Fairs” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Public libraries are opening, the first day without a Covid-19 death since March, the MTA looks for ideas, the NYPD steals streets, and more

Today – Low: 71˚ High: 86˚
Clear throughout the day.

You’ll see some headlines that some areas of Queens are seeing a 58% or 68% positive rate for antibodies. While this seems like good news, having antibodies is no way to guarantee that you can’t get the infection again or even that you’ve had the infection in the past. The hope would be that neighborhoods may develop herd immunity. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The city has not built up herd immunity, which is the message from Jay Varna, the Senior Advisor for Public Health, NYC Mayor’s Office, and a vast majority of New Yorkers are still susceptible. (Brendan Krisel for Patch)

The city’s ban on events means a summer without street fairs. This also includes Celebrate Brooklyn!, the Dominican Day Parade, San Gennaro, and the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

As you might expect, the Electric Zoo 2020 has been canceled. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

Saturday was the first day since March 13 that no one was recorded as dying due to the coronavirus. Since March 23,283 were reported dead. (Nick Visser for HuffPost)

A look at the more difficult side of the Occupy City Hall, as the organizers have realized that their roles include caretakers for dozens of the city’s homeless that have taken to making their home in the occupation. (Alan Feuer, Juliana Kim and Byron Smith for NY Times)

Kudos to Sasha Baron Cohen, who hasn’t let the pandemic stop him from freaking out Rudy Giuliani so badly that he called the police. (Amanda Hatfield for BrooklynVegan)

An overview of The Montefiore Family Resilience Fund, which supplies assistance for households that have lost a breadwinner or caregiver to Covid-19. The fund will assist 375 families. (Norwood News)

Officer Ernie Moran, an off-duty NYPD cop was arrested in Queens during the early hours Wednesday morning for harassing and stalking his ex-girlfriend. (Michael Dorgan for Queens Post)

Mayor de Blasio’s cuts to the NYPD included killing off the parking placard abuse unit, ensuring that he will do absolutely nothing as a mayor to end this form of low-level corruption from the NYPD. The mayor and the City Council have announced multiple initiatives to curb this type of corruption, but literally nothing has been done so far. (Julianne Cuba for Streetsblog)

The NYPD has seized streets all across the city that are adjacent to station houses. Why? Don’t ask the mayor, who refuses to confront the NYPD on this theft of public space. (Gersh Kuntzman for Streetsblog)

Is the Staten Island Ferris wheel returning from the dead? The details haven’t been released, but it seems like a smaller version of the original idea might still have life. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

Financial struggles brought on by the coronavirus pandemic will keep 15 Catholic schools across New York City closed for good. (Alex Mitchell and Robert Pozarycki for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is turning to the public for ideas for how to keep trains and buses virus-free. Have any ideas? (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

A look at the work of the Brooklyn Conviction Review Unit, whose job it is to correct hundreds of years of wrongful convictions in Brooklyn of Black and Latinx Brooklynites. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

“We take responsibility for what happens in our stores—both on and off our sales floors—and we are committed to doing the work to improve how we treat our employees and customers.” Greenlight Bookstore co-owners Rebecca Fitting and Jessica Stockton-Bagnulo have made a public apology for creating an unwelcoming environment for Black customers and employees. (Brooklyn Reader)

15 New York City pools that will be reopening in August. (Jenna Fanelli for amNewYork Metro)

Here’s what a car-free, pedestrian-friendly NYC could look like., according to a plan from Architect Vishaan Chakrabarti and his firm Practice for Architecture and Urbanism. (Davin Gannon 6sqft)

Another look at the mass die-offs of fish in the Hudson river. A combination of sewage being dumped into the waters, lack of rain, and the heat are creating an extreme situation leading to the massive deaths of fish. (David Cruz for Gothamist)

Wo Hop returns today for takeout orders. (Elie Z. Perler for Bowery Boogie)

Who isn’t filling out their census forms? It might be the rich. (Dana Rubenstein for NY Times)

Jose Barrera, a 50-year-old Brooklyn man was fatally run over in Borough Park while unloading his car outside his home on Saturday night. The driver was taken into custody, passed a DWI test, and was released without being charged Barrera is the 29th pedestrian to be killed by someone driving a car in 2020. (John Del Signore for Gothamist)

Video: Drone footage of NYC’s Black Lives Matter murals. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

Alt-side parking is suspended until July 19. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

22 public libraries in the city are reopening today. (Gillian Smith for Patch)

14 unique outdoor dining options. (Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Nai for today’s featured photo!