The Briefly for August 7, 2019 – The “A Bizzaro World Financial District” Edition

Gun violence in the city is up, the 14th St busway can move forward, James O’Neill says the decision about firing Daniel Panteleo is difficult, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Tiffany Cabán conceded to Melinda Katz in the Queens DA primary. (amNY)

National Grid is denying new service for restaurants in the city who need natural gas until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation approves a natural gas pipeline that was rejected over water quality concerns in May. (Bedford + Bowery)

If you read the quotes about the Financial District in this Times article about the “Village-like quality” to it, Next Wednesday’s news will be saturated with child sex abuse lawsuits. Under the Child Victims Act, adult victims of child sex abuse will have one year to file lawsuits as the age to file changes from 21 to 55 moving forward. Catholic dioceses, the Boy Scouts, hospitals, and schools are all expected to be on the receiving end of hundreds of lawsuits. (Gothamist)

A woman in Queens’ complaints about her state trooper neighbor’s air conditioner resulted in her being arrested twice and strip-searched, according to a lawsuit against the neighbor, 14 members of the NYPD, and the city. (Patch)

When Bill de Blasio’s daughter moved to Gracie Mansion from an apartment in Brooklyn, she had help from her personal NYPD security detail. According to Citizens Union, having police detectives assist in this would be a violation of the city’s Conflicts of Interest Law. Another violation to add to the growing pile. (NY Times)

Portions of the old Kosciuszko Bridge are being used to form an artificial reef off Fire Island as part of the state’s artificial reef program. Also buried at sea was pieces of the Staten Island Expressway. (Untapped Cities)

Barneys filed for bankruptcy and will close 15 of its 22 stores, but its Madison Ave store will remain open. (NY Times)

It was the focus of a 30 Rock Episode (“Sun Tea” S04E06) and countless other sitcoms. Is it okay to combine two apartments? (StreetEasy)

An NYPD sergeant filed a federal lawsuit against the city and two fellow officers, claiming he was told to “go back to where you belong” and that they prevented his career from advancing due to his age and nation of origin. (Gothamist)

On August 8, Burger Kings across the city (and country) will make the Impossible Whopper available for purchase. Where else you can find the Impossible Burger in the city. (Grub Street)

An NYPD judge recommend he be fired, there have been protests for five years calling for his firing, the speaker of the city council has called for his firing, the governor says he should be fired, you can add Elizabeth Warren’s name to the list too, but NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill calls his decision about the cop who used a banned chokehold against Eric Garner that resulted in Garner’s death a “difficult decision.” (Politico)

Special education should be taken from the Department of Education and moved into the oversight of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, according to Bronx City Councilmember Andy King. The resolution follows 7,500 due process complaints against the DOE and a lawsuit against the DOE. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The restraining order against the 14th St busway has been lifted and the city will move forward with its 18-month pilot program on August 12. (Gothamist)

City Councilmember Costa Constantinides is calling for the MTA’s pilot program of installing netting under aging and elevated trains in Queens to be expanded to the entire elevated stretch of the N and W lines. There have been multiple reports of falling debris and construction ephemera, including the car that was impaled on Roosevelt Ave by a wooden beam. (Curbed)

Murder, rape, robbery, burglary, felony assault, grand larceny, and auto theft are down 4% across the city this year, but gun violence is up over 5%. (Patch)

De Blasio scored an impressive 6%, but not in voters who would prefer him as a presidential candidate. 6% of people say he was the worst performer during the Democratic presidential debates. His support is still below 1%. (Politico)

Self-driving cars at the Brooklyn Navy Yard launched, but not without a minor mistake. One of the vehicles reversed into another car. The kicker? It was being driven and was not in self-driving mode at the time. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

NYPD school safety officer Edward Peterson was arrested for allegedly forcing a teenager to perform oral sex on him back in 2013. (Bklyner)

Contact with the NYPD may be bad for your health. Poor physical and mental health, hypertension and binge drinking are all more prevalent among people who have been abused by police, put behind bars or on probation or parole than those who have not, according to a report by the city’s Department of Health. (Patch)

The Metropolitan Opera and Conductor James Levine settled their lawsuit over Levine’s firing after multiple allegations were made of sexual misconduct. The settlement was out of court, so no details are known. (NY Times)

Do you have an idea of how to improve the city’s waterfront? Bring your ideas to a Waterfront Planning Camp on Governor’s Island on August 17 from noon to 4. (amNY)

A guide to surviving the summer in Williamsburg. (6sqft)

The Briefly for June 14, 2019 – The “A Plan To Save Us All From the Sea” Edition

The religious exemption for vaccines is ending, a ball-pit bar is coming to Brooklyn, the weekend subway service changes, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This is the end of the religious exemption from vaccines in New York state. The legislature agreed on a bill and the governor has said he would sign it to prevent future public health crises similar to the current measles outbreak. (NY Times)

It’s the weekend, so usual “check the subways before you go anywhere” rules apply. (Subway Weekender)

Get to know your Queens District Attorney candidates. (Queens Crap)

Jon Stewart, New York’s collective voice, had a heck of a week. It opened with shaming Congress, which resulted in moving the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund moving forward, and ended with an extremely personal gift from some grateful firefighters. (Gothamist)

The United States Army Corps of Engineers released a series of plans to save New York from when the sea rises up to eat us. Each of the proposals will cost billions of dollars and would dramatically change the city’s coastline. A plan will be selected either later this year or early next year. The plans range from a 25-year construction that would cost over $100 billion to nine years and cost about $15 billion. (Curbed)

The park at Essex Crossing in the Lower East Side is now open. (6sqft)

A 4-alarm fire broke out in Midwood that injured twelve and spread through three houses and was caught on fire. Three firefighters were among the twelve. (Gothamist)

Sometimes justice moves slowly. Elizabeth Lederer, the lead prosecutor in the Central Park Five case, will not return as a lecturer at Columbia Law School after the release of Netflix’s “When They See Us.” (amNY)

Here are the important points of info you need to know about the new rent reform package. (Gothamist)

There’s more to Coney Island than Nathan’s and Totonno’s. 9 places to eat in Coney Island, but honestly, all you need to know is Dona Zita. (Eater)

The 11234 zip code, where you can find Bergen Beach, Mill Basin and Flatlands, has more baby boomers than any other zipcode in the United States. The city has 14 of the top 20 zip codes for boomers, with the city holding the top four spots. (Patch)

The old Coffee Shop in Union Square is going to become a Chase Bank. (Gothamist)

There’s an office tower in Manhattan unfortunately named “Penn15.” (The Real Deal)

Where to eat a last minute dinner in the East Village. (The Infatuation)

The people in the city’s homeless shelters are treated like numbers and the employees of the Department of Homeless Services appears to be abusing “emergency” transfers to move people around for seemingly no reason. (NY Times)

Is El Museo del Barrio turning its back on the local Latinx community? The Mirror Manifesto, an open letter signed by artists, was read while protestors occupied the museum’s 50th Anniversary celebrations. (Gothamist)

Starting July 1, the NYPD will take a different tact with people who are homeless on the subway and commit minor infractions. Instead of a summons, they will be sent to a detox facility, shelter, or to get other kinds of help as needed. The purpose of the pilot program is to divert people away from the court system and to work to minimize subway disruptions, which had tripled in the last few years. (Patch)

Remember the most expensive apartment in the city? The one that came with two tickets two space, a yacht, two full-time servants, and a bevy of other amenities that seemed too good to be true? Turns out it was a fake and a marketing tactic for the building. The listing was a combination of about a dozen different apartments on the 45th floor. (Curbed)

What’s the best time of year to look for an apartment in the city? StreetEasy broke it down neighborhood by neighborhood, and we’re heading into the worst time of year for most areas. (Curbed)

It might not be surprising that the neighborhoods with the most excessive airplane noise are in Queens, with Brookville, Howard Beach, and Flushing topping the list. (Localize.Labs)

If you’ve fallen in love with the MTA’s new rainbow transit heart, you can find it on some of the city’s 1 trains and on MetroCards. Five subway trains are sporting the MTA Pride logo and you can get special edition World Pride MetroCards at a few select subway stations. (Gothamist)

The unofficial MTA Pride Train signs are back across the city. (amNY)

Turns out dads can be stay-at-home parents too! Who knew? (amNY)

There’s coffee and then there’s coffee. Sawada, a Tokyo-style cafe, is “one of the most genuinely inspired additions to the New York coffee scene in some time.” (Eater)

The Barclays Center announced a free summer concert series featuring Andy Suzuki & The Method, Nappy Nina and Dj Donwill, DJ Mick, and more. (The Brooklyn Reader)

An analysis from the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs indicates that the president’s immigration policies are having a chilling effect on immigrants using SNAP benefits. The rate of non-citizens dropping out of the program is four times higher than citizens dropping out. (NY Times)

Let’s ask the scary questions. How safe is the elevator in your building? (the Real Deal)

Let’s all say farewell to the small superheroes of NYC, with the last season of Jessica Jones closing out The Defenders’ run on Netflix. Daredevil, Iron Fist, Luke Cage, Punisher, and Jessica Jones were New York City’s heroes and the fun game of where was that filmed?” will have to be reserved for re-watches. (amNY)

They don’t make subway stations like they used to. This time it was Atlantic Terminal that saw a crumbling ceiling along the D, N, R tracks. This incident can be attributed to a non-MTA contractor puncturing the ceiling while taking a soil sample above ground, but add it to the list of inconveniences we all absorb on a daily basis. (amNY)

A ball-pit bar is coming to… no not Bushwick, but very close to it. (Gothamist)

Inside the NYPL’s Stonewall exhibition. (Gothamist)

This week in NIMBY news: The homeless shelter on Billionaire’s Row has cleared a legal hurdle but the neighborhood continues to fight against it. (Curbed)

In more NIMBY news, Community Board 2 has overwhelmingly voted against the mayor’s Rikers Island neighborhood replacement. (Brooklyn Paper)

The Grub Street guide to the summer’s “Can’t-Miss” food festivals. (Grub Street)

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The Briefly for April 23, 2019 – The “DA’s Secret List of Tainted Police Officers” Edition

Someone is smashing the LinkNYC kiosks, $3,000 “affordable” apartments, Di Fara’s pizza, fighting back against the paper bag tax, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Someone is smashing LinkNYC kiosks in Chelsea. It could be someone trying to send a message to neighborhood resident Google, who basically owns them and the data they collect. (Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York)

It’s been discussed for over a dozen years, but the federal government’s Opportunity Zone program may be the catalyst that changes Willets Point forever. (The Real Deal)

Taxed to death. That’s how Queens City Councilmember Robert Holden views the city’s paper bag nickel tax when plastic bags become banned. (QNS)

The city’s DAs keep secret lists of NYPD officers who have perjured themselves in criminal prosecutions in order to avoid using them as witnesses. Civil-liberties advocates are calling for a review of past convictions based on testimony from potentially tainted officers. (Gothamist)

He’s not wrong, New York’s taxes paid per income is 12.7%, the highest in the nation and 22 of the top 25 counties paying the highest amount of taxes are in New York state. Manhattan specifically pays 2.7% of all federal income tax collected with only 0.48% of the country’s population. (Business Insider)

Say hello to the newest restaurants in the city. (amNY)

Kudos to Queens educator Danielle Hnath, who promised her students she would dye her hair blue if they raised over $8,000 for the American Heart Association. They raised $10,000. (QNS)

Technically they apply, but something doesn’t seem right about a $3,000/month apartment on Staten Island qualifying as fulfilling the mayor’s promise to create 300,000 “affordable” apartments. (The City)

The top twelve restaurants serving the underrated food of Puebla, Mexico. A very specific list. (Eater)

NYCWiN, which went down for a full week due to a Y2K-esque bug, cost the city a billion dollars. Northrup Grumman’s contract has been extended to June 2020 for $40 million. (Patch)

A look back at Five Points, not the mural space, the most notorious neighborhood in the city’s history. (StreetEasy)

The best neighborhoods for New Yorkers over 65, or the best neighborhoods for people under 65 who want to live in a very quiet apartment building. (6sqft)

A series of self-guided and thematic NYC exploration walks, created by New Yorkers. (r/NYC)

The NYPD, having solved the city’s other problems, targeted a “Race and Bake” bike ride on 4/20, showing up to arrest the organizer with printouts of his social media posts. He was arrested for an open ticket container ticket he got in 2015. (Gothamist)

How Di Fara became an NYC pizza institution. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a recycling center, from truck to 1,000 plastic bales. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The city wants to expand Staten Island’s dockless bike share program, but without the entire island having a single bike lane. (Streetsblog)

The eight oldest buildings in Queens. (Untapped Cities)

The MTA, in a surprisingly logical move, is looking to add solar panels to the roofs of its train yards, bus depots, and buildings. (amNY)

Get ready to vote in a completely different way. The Charter Revision Commission’s preliminary staff report hint that the city will end the practice of costly runoff elections during primaries by adopting ranked choice voting. (The City)

Ranked choice voting, aka the alternative vote, explained. (CGP Gray)

Where to have a unique dining experience. Yeah, it’s not exactly a descriptive title for a list of restaurants, but lets’ be honest that you’ll probably click on it anyway because it’s the last link in the email and you’re probably more than a little curious, no? (The Infatuation)

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