The Briefly for January 7, 2018 – The “Surviving A Fall Onto the Subway Tracks” Edition

Fair Fares launches with little fanfare, Albany’s been pocketing hundreds of millions of cell phone taxes, Amazon’s charm offensive starts, Oreo squirrel, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The No Pants Subway Ride is this weekend, plan accordingly. (Gothamist)

That L train un-shutdown? It still needs the MTA board’s approval. (amNY)

Forget eggroll squirrel, here comes Oreo Squirrel! (West Side Rag)

He fell onto the subway tracks and SURVIVED! An unidentified man fell onto the track and laid underneath the train as it went over him. He was taken to the hospital as a precaution, but he walked away uninjured. (NY Post)

Brooklyn’s first medical marijuana dispensary opened across from the Barclays Center. Only qualifying patients for now. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Kindergarten impossible. How did this 5-year-old boy escape his school and get on a subway platform without being noticed? (Gothamist)

I Eat from UWS Dumpsters and So Should You” Not me, that’s the headline. (West Side Rag)

The holidays are over, we’ve landed back in full-steam-ahead early January, you know what time it is? Girl Scout cookies. If you don’t have a Girl Scout in your life, here’s how to score some Tagalongs. (amNY)

NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill continues to think of new reasons to worry about marijuana legalization. Last week it was the retirement of marijuana-sniffing dogs, this week the excuses are underage use (which did not go up in Colorado after weed became legal) and grow house explosions. (NY Post)

The history of NYC style pizza in under eight minutes. (DidYouKnowFood)

The 168th and 181st 1 train stations in Washington Heights will be closing for nearly a year, here’s how to get around during the closure. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio launched the Fair Fares program, as you’d expect from our mayor, with too little information for too little people and late. (Politico)

A portion of Northern Boulevard around 114th Streets collapsed into a construction site on Friday and it is indefinitely closed between 111th and 114th and indefinitely. There were no injuries and no utility disruptions. (Jackson Heights Post)

Apartment owners in the Citylights co-op in Long Island City are protesting the scheduled end of their 20-year real estate tax abatement. Since 1997, the co-op has been paying a discounted tax rate on apartments that originally sold between $10k and $65, which are now worth close to 16x their original value. (LIC Post)

Two firehouses in Queens were closed due to a scabies outbreak. Scabies is… gross and let’s not discuss that it’s caused by bugs that crawl under your skin and lay eggs. (NY Post)

Brooklyn lawyer Rashaun Kelley was arrested in connection to a series of sexual assaults which date back to 2014. He faces sex abuse, burglary and attempted rape charges. (CBS New York)

“Happy New Year from your future neighbors at Amazon.” Amazon has started their charm offensive. (Amazon)

A profile of Figure Skating in Harlem, where young women of color train to compete in a spot dominated by whites. (NY Times)

The First Street Garden Art Park has a new mural to match one of Congress’ new faces: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. (@lexibellaart)

RIP to one of NYC’s centenarians, “Big Helen” Sieczkowski, who passed away on January 2nd at 100 years young. (Bklyner)

Unsurprisingly, New York was not on the list of cities where you can buy a home with an annual salary of $60k or less. (The Real Deal)

The head of the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission will step down with no successor announced by City Hall. After the sixth suicide by a cab driver in the last 13 months, there have been calls for Meera Joshi to step down from drivers and politicians. (Crain’s New York)

Albany “diverted” hundreds of millions of dollars over the last ten years meant for emergency communication services, according to the FCC. NY uses the money for “non-public safety or unspecified uses.” The governor’s office refutes that claim. (NY Post)

The Bronx Riviera is planning a roaring comeback with a $75 million renovation of the landmarked Orchard Beach pavilion. The project is still in the planning phase, a date has not been set for completion. (amNY)

Our mayor, the cartoon character. (NY Times)

The city spent $4.1 million over three years to give deer vasectomies in Staten Island in hopes of reducing the number of road accidents, but 2018’s 103 accidents with 17 injuries marked an all-time high. (NY Post)

If you don’t know Paul Manship’s name, you’ve seen his work. His sculptures inhabit Central Park like the “Group of Bears” or the gates to the Children’s Zoo, but Prometeus, which looks over the skating rink at Rockefeller Center, is likely his best known work in the city. (Ephemeral New York)

A map of every bagel shop in New York City. (Brooklyn Bagel Blog)

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The Briefly for December 17, 2018 – The “Get Ready For Metal Detectors in the Subway” Edition

Late-night subway changes, the most expensive neighborhoods, someone is sealing cats inside buckets, a federal takeover of the NYCHA has a deadline, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

Whoever the hell is sealing cats inside five gallon buckets and abandoning them near trash cans on the street, you are the lowest scum on earth. This has all the makings of an urban myth, but each time the cats were saved and are with the Animal Haven shelter. (HuffPost)

21-year-old MD Rajon was the 11th cyclist killed on the road in the city in 2018. (Streetsblog)

Governor Cuomo on the L train shutdown: “New Yorkers are willing to bear the expense and the burden of change.” Right, like we had any choice about this. (NY Post)

The NYPD has found a way to make the subways even worse than the current state of the transit hellhole: metal detectors. (Gothamist)

amNewYork’s 2018 Transit Wish List is the most depressing holiday wish list of all. (amNY)

The #1 reason companies cite when deciding not to expand their offices to New York is the condition of our transportation system. (NY Times)

The 10 most expensive neighborhoods in the city. (The Real Deal)

43% of the fish purchased in the city is mislabeled, according to a new lawsuit from the NY Attorney General Barbara Underwood’s office. (NY Post)

The seemingly infinite construction on the corner of Houston and Bowery is finally coning to an end. The project started in 2004 and was scheduled to be finished by Labor Day of 2017. (Bowery Boogie)

The diary of Philip Hone, a socialite and short-termed mayor, from the 1820’s-1850’s includes the opening of NYU, the great fire of 1835, the stock market crash and shows that New Yorkers have always had some of the same thoughts and concerns. (Ephemeral New York)

A real international affair. An Argentine diplomat’s husband beat up a United Nation Worker at a drunken party at the Cuban embassy, but won’t face charges due to his wife’s diplomatic immunity. (NY Post)

Hoboken’s SantaCon did not disappoint with nearly 500 complaints, 14 arrests and four hospitalized police officers. (NY Post)

Jazmine Headley broke her silence about the December 7 incident where her child was ripped from her hands by police at a social services office in Brooklyn. (NY Post)

Leaving a traffic cone behind to keep your parking spot is an illegal but clever way to reserve your parking spot, but Ridgewood’s 104th precinct is starting to catch on. (TimesLedger)

The NYCHA has a January 31, 2019 deadline to make a deal with federal prosecutors before a federal takeover. (Politico)

New York’s flora faces a new threat from a “superbug” that hitched a ride on Christmas trees from out of state. The Spotted Lanternfly is native to Southeast Asia and could be a serious problem to the city’s parks. (NY Post)

This is how The Rockettes’ shoes are made. (Viewing NYC)

Lawmakers from Eastern Queens are arguing against congestion pricing because they say it unfairly targets city residents who live in commuter deserts. (amNY)

Colin Kroll, the CEO of HQ Trivia and co-founder of Vine, was found dead of an apparent cocaine and heroine overdose at 34 in his Manhattan apartment. (NY Times)

There is no 3 train, the F is always local in Queens, the N and Q is express-only in Manhattan and other inconveniences when it comes to the late-night subway service changes. (Subway Changes)

Unagi, a seafood restaurant with a live eel tank, claims it is helping the endangered species of eel that issuing kept in a tank to be killed and served for lunch, by popularizing the fish. Right. (Eater)

The anti-tourist guide to celebrating the holidays in NYC (StreetEasy)

Too cold outside to make it to Bryant Park for ice skating? Watch the webcam instead. (Bryant Park NYC on YouTube)

Thanks to @linesofnyc_ for today’s featured image.

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The Briefly for Labor Day 2018 – The City Has A New Pot Policy

The NYPD will issue summons instead of arrests in most cases involving smoking pot in public, but critics point out the new policy may continue to allow for racial profiling in arrests made.

There’s a new pot policy in the city, which started September 1. Anyone caught smoking marijuana in public will receive a summons instead of being arrested. There are exceptions to this rule, the most notable being that police can “exercise discretion” on how best to proceed.

The Village Voice has ceased publishing new stories, as reported by the re-animated corpse of Gothamist. The owner, Peter D. Barbey, is going to continue to make the paper’s archives available online. Gothamist suffered a similar fate, but was brought back to life by WNYC.

Less than a month after Inwood’s rezoning, the first 30-story rental tower is planned. The purpose of the rezoning was to encourage 5,000 new apartments in the neighborhood.

The city, working with Legal Aid, is working to get the 6,000 eligible people in Rikers Island registered to vote. The deadline to vote in the general elections on November 6 i October 12.

Another chapter in the long and complicated story of 85 Bowery has come to an end. On Thursday, tenants returned to their renovated homes almost two years after they were vacated from the building due to deteriorating conditions. In 2016, the owner filed a lawsuit to evict (rather than vacate) all tenants of the building, which spurred a legal argument about rent stabilized apartments. The story of the struggle between the tenants and the landlord isn’t over, but tenants once again have their homes.

Despite big promises about Mayor de Blasio’s Vision Zero, the NYPD has investigated less fatal collisions between pedestrians and cars. Investigations are down 19% and there are two fewer officers in the unit since 2013 (a promise was made to add more).

1,160 kids in NYCHA housing tested positive for lead poisoning since 2012. That number started as 19, then was revised to 820 and has ballooned to over 1,000. On the radio on Friday Mayor de Blasio made attempts to deflect the blame, insisting that the city hadn’t violated the CDC’s instructions, rather they hadn’t adhered to its guidance.

The Leave Behind Naloxone Program will leave a drug overdose kit with overdose survivors. Friends and family of survivors can also request a kit. Naloxone is used to block the effects of opioids in an overdose.

It’s been ten years since Coney Island’s Astroland closed. The Coney Island History Project is celebrating the lost amusement park throughout this month.

What is going on with The Michelle Obama Political Club that is in no way affiliated with Michelle Obama and why did this oddly named and seemingly newly formed group endorse State Senator Jesse Hamilton against Zellnor Myrie?

After declaring he would stop balancing the Sisyphus Stones, Uliks Gryka has stated he will return to Fort Washington Park to balance the stones after the stones were vandalized.

Melissa and Michelle Jones have become the NYPD’s first ever black twin-sister detectives.

Here it is, the dumbest opinion about bike lanes in history.

Juliio C. Ayala, an 18-year-old believed to be affiliated with MS-13, was arraigned on Sunday that he raped an 11-year-old girl in Brooklyn.

At 8.4%, Queens had the highest year-over-year rent hike in the country in August.

Another account of the Central Park West ghost bus, which the MTA says does not exist… but it does.

The man who sprayed a mystery substance on NYC buses was 46-year-old Andre Chandler and the mystery substance was bear repellant (twice as strong as pepper-spray). He faces 20 counts of assault and as far as we know there were no bears aboard those buses.

Please stop feeding the squirrels in Madison Square Park!


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