The Briefly for August 5, 2019 – The “Subway Supervillain Has Returned” Edition

Daniel Pantaleo recommended being fired, R Kelly denied bail, how trucks became Vision Zero’s biggest violators, the best lobster rolls, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

This week’s late-night subway disruption lottery winners are the 2, 3, A, #, N and R trains. (Subway Weekender)

Manhattan DA Cy Vance Jr. is reviving an investigation into hush-money payments made to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougal from the Trump Organization. The investigation will be looking into if the Trump Organization falsified business records. (NY Times)

The city’s subway supervillain was back at it and was arrested for the seventeenth time for a subway-related offense. Isaiah Thompson is the man who was pulling emergency brakes on multiple subways, causing hundreds of delays. His latest arrest was for subway surfing. (NY Times)

The ten oldest parks in the city. (Untapped Cities)

The 42nd Street Shuttle will be “modernized,” which means some temporary delays and reduction of service. How modern? That’s questionable, but at the very least the trains and platforms will be ADA compliant, widened, and the cars themselves extended from four trains to six. (Second Ave Sagas)

The legal fight over the mega-development in the Lower East Side will continue on, but what started it? A 2016 decision by the de Blasio administration to classify residential buildings over eight stories “minor modifications” to the existing developments and could bypass the land review process kicked it off. The towers planned are 1,004-feet tall, 798-feet tall, 728-feet tall, and 724-feet tall, which all seems a bit more than minor modifications. (Bowery Boogie)

Daniel Pantaleo should be fired. That’s the decision that a police administrative judge came to in a Civilian Complaint Review Board case. Will he be? That’s a decision for James O’Neill, the NYPD commissioner, who can decide “no,” despite the judge’s decision. (NY Times)

Eric Garner’s family promised large protests if Pantaleo isn’t fired. (amNY)

What’s the history of the closet-sized “POLICE” building on Lee Avenue in Williamsburg? (Untapped Cities)

The total number of jobs in the city has gone up, but the total number of hours per week is down, essentially neutralizing the job gain when it comes to wages. The city’s lower than the average number of hours per week compared to the nation is an indicator of a substantial income gap that continues to widen. (amNY)

Mayor de Blasio put a freeze on new licenses for Uber, Lyft and the like in a hope to reduce the number of cars on the streets and therefore reduce traffic and pollution. He also said, “We are not here to serve the corporate titans, we are here to serve the people.” Unfortunately, the aftermath of this is that cars that have licenses are rented out, creating corporate titans on a smaller scale and further reducing the wages he was hoping to save. (Kings County Politics)

Where to get fun, non-alcoholic drinks in Astoria. (We Heart Astoria)

This week’s list of restaurants closed by the Department of Health has no 100-point violations, but it does include the Greenwich Social food hall. (Patch)

The Algonquin Hotel Cat Fashion Show featured outfits from Ada Nieves, and of course, there are photos. (Untapped Cities)

Why is it that when you send a piece of mail to someone in Brooklyn, but when you send it to Queens it’s sent to a specific neighborhood? There are myths about the reason and the post office can’t be fully be blamed either. It’s a bit of a mystery. (Gothamist)

An odd opinion piece from Polly Trottenberg, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, which seems to be focused on the difficulty the DOT’s job is when they keep getting sued by NIMBYs. (Streetsblog)

The country’s only floating pool is in the Bronx. fwiw, it’s floating on the East River, not in mid-air. (6sqft)

Mayor de Blasio is accused of using a state election fund to help his cash-strapped presidential campaign, which is a violation of federal finance laws. Law-breaking fundraising is nothing new to de Blasio. (Patch & NY Times)

Video: The Tiffany clock in Grand Central is worth $20 million, here’s why. (Viewing NYC)

R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to sex trafficking charges. (amNY)

He was denied bail, is being held in Brooklyn, and his lawyer claims that he is the real victim. (NY Times)

What are the most expensive homes for sale in each borough? Come on, you know you’re curious. (Patch)

Despite what this etiquette post from Gothamist says, I disagree and say it’s perfectly fine to read text messages from someone else’s screen on the subway. (Gothamist)

Last summer the water fountains on Roosevelt Island were shut off because the water they were serving up was contaminated. There is no indication that they will be functional in 2019. Pack a water bottle. (Roosevelt Islander Online)

Highlighted by the recent killing of Em Samolewicz, how did large trucks become Vision Zero’s worst offenders? (Gothamist)

We need new laws that cause much more consequence if a motorist is negligent and they kill someone, even if it wasn’t their intention.” -Mayor de Blasio, responding to a question about on WNYC’s “Ask the Mayor” (Gothamist)

It is time to stop blaming cyclists for the problems on the city’s roads. (NY Times)

There are many reasons not to swim in the lake in Prospect Park, from the signs instructing you not to swim in the lake to the blue-green algae bacteria blooms that produce deadly toxins. Someone decided to give it a try anyway and he was dragged out of the lake by the NYPD and taken for psychiatric evaluation. (Brooklyn Paper)

The NYPD Counterterrorism Bureau asks if you see additional police to “not be alarmed” as they engage in security theater after this weekend’s mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. (amNY)

Gays Against Guns took to Times Square over the weekend to push for more gun control laws. (amNY)

The five best lobster rolls in the city. (Thrillist)

The Briefly for July 15, 2019 – The “I’ve Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway” Edition

Our absent mayor was absent during the blackout, the reinvention of the rainbow cookie, de Blasio hires his son to save his 0% campaign, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The late-night disruptions this week are minimal unless you’re on the L train in Brooklyn. Service is suspended between Lorimer and Broadway Junction. (Subway Weekender)

A gallery of how broadway shows and professional musicians handled the blackout, along with New Yorkers stepping up to direct traffic, and a video of the lights turning back on. (Huff Post)

When the power went out, the first question was “why?” The second question was where the hell is our mayor? (NY Times)

Where was the mayor? He has an average 0% support and yet he was spending the day in Iowa. (Politico)

When he was asked on the air on CNN at 9 pm, two hours after the blackout began the mayor said he was still weighing his options. (Politico)

While a portion of the city sat in darkness, it was Corey Johnson that provided public leadership on the news, Twitter, and during Sunday’s press conference. Our absentee mayor continued to be absent. (Chelsea Now)

Want to live in a city where you can save money for a rainy day? Too bad, you live in New York. (CNBC)

If you’re the person that’s been praying for consistent hot temperatures, this is the week where all your friends will give you the side-eye. Welcome to the first sweltering week of summer. (amNY)

The state legislature passed the Utility Responsibility Bill and now it waits for the governor’s signature. The bill would protect homeowners if any damage was done to their property by utility companies. (QNS)

Do you know the difference between a studio and a one-bedroom apartment? Did you know a bedroom needs to be a minimum of 80 square feet with a ceiling height minimum of eight feet? (StreetEasy)

R. Kelly has been arrested and indicted of racketeering and violating federal anti-sex trafficking laws. These are in addition to the charges he’s facing in Illinois. He faces up to 70 years in prison. (Patch)

The rainbow cookie is already perfect, but some chefs can’t leave well-enough alone. (Eater)

Whoever the monster is that stole the key to the city received by Allie Long, a member of the US Women’s National Team, understand that you have made very powerful enemies. (Gothamist)

Your landlord can threaten to let your apartment fall into disrepair, but they can’t actually do that. Learn about the warranty of habitability and what it means for your apartment. (Gothamist)

This week’s restaurants ordered closed by the Department of Health includes “BKLYN Wild” in the Time Out Market, which broke the 100 violation point mark with a 102 score. (Patch)

Governor Cuomo, who has insisted that he is not in control of the MTA, has they need you to adopt or foster an animal. (amNY)

This Saturday is the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon and the city is celebrating multiple ways. (Gothamist)

Inside a mostly abandoned mall in Queens, Board of Elections worker are counting out the fate of the Queens District Attorney’s office. (Gothamist)

A lawsuit is challenging the legality of the “spot rezoning” that was necessary to allow the 80 Flatbush development project a reality. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Abel Cedeno says he had been bullied for being gay, took the stand in his own defense at his manslaughter trial for the murder of two of his high school classmates with a knife. (NY Times)

The city unveiled its plans to protect the east side of Manhattan from the Lower East Side to 25th St with the design of the East River Park. The East Side Coastal Resiliency Project’s walls and design would protect the area from a 16 foot level of sea rise, which is the “100-year flood + waves” level. (Curbed)

A human leg was found in a channel in the waters of Coney Island. (Brooklyn Paper)

If you think you apply for affordable housing in the city, registration is a fairly simple process. (Curbed)

The city council’s Committee on Small Business is calling on Letitia James’s office to look at the settlement agreement that allowed Grub Hub to buy Seamless in 2013 in light of the reports about Grub Hub’s business tactics. (Grub Street)

JetBlue installed Does Starbucks sell newspapers? If you answered no, you’ll soon be proven right because the company announced that they will stop selling The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and USA Today at its 8,600 locations nationwide. (NY Times)

RIP Hector Figueroa, former president of the Service Employees International Union and a key player in the fight for a $15 minimum wage. (NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio is polling at a 0% average in the Democrat presidential primary. Will hiring his son help his campaign? It literally couldn’t hurt it. (NY Times)

A preliminary report is suggesting that the impending MTA overhaul reduce the number of groups within the organization from 40 into six departments to centralize and simplify. The MTA’s board is expected to vote on a final version of the plan on the 24th. (amNY)

The President’s ICE enforcement action started on Saturday in the city, but early reports indicate that no one opened their doors for ICE and as a result, no one was detained. (amNY)

The race to replace José E. Serrano after he steps down as a result of a Parkinson’s disease diagnosis will be contended by Ruben Diaz Sr, an openly homophobic city councilperson, and Ritchie J Torres, the first openly gay person to hold office in the Bronx. (NY Times)

Need a late-night fix and you already had pizza for lunch? A list of late-night delivery spots that aren’t just pizza. (The Infatuation)

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The Briefly for July 11, 2019 – The “A Love Letter to the Salt Bagel” Weekend Edition

Fighting this weekend’s planned ICE raids, more people are staying put in Brooklyn and Queens, the city’s speed camera program starts to expand and more in today’s daily NYC news digest.

The president’s ICE raids scheduled to take place this weekend have included New York as a target. The governor announced anyone in need of assistance may contact the Liberty Defense Project via the New York State New Americans Hotline at 1-800-566-7636 or liberty@dos.ny.gov.

What should you do if ICE is at your door or the door of someone you know? Here are the ACLU’s guidelines and outlines of your rights. (ACLU)

The Amazon Web Services Summit at the Javitz Center drew crowds protesting Amazon’s involvement with ICE with their Rekognition Video system. (amNY)

Riding the subway still sucks, but it sucks the least its sucked since 2013, with an on-time performance over 80%. (Curbed)

Check the trains before you venture out this weekend. This is the last weekend of reduced L train service before the multi-week night and weekend partial shutdown starts and remains through January. (Subway Weekender)

R. Kelly was arrested by the NYPD and Homeland Security in Chicago on federal sex trafficking charges and is expected to be brought to New York to face those charges. (NBC New York)

A love letter to the salt bagel. (Eater)

The NYPD claims to have figured out the reason for an uptick of shootings in northern Brooklyn: District Attorney Eric Gonzalez. The NYPD is blaming a program where weapons-possession offenders can plead guilty and take part in an educational program instead of being jailed. Putting the blame on this program has two flaws. The program is a decade old, the uptick in shootings are only in one portion of the borough while the program is borough-wide, and it does not apply to anyone who has used a gun, only those possessing them. (Brooklyn Paper)

Have mannequin, will carpool. A hero from New Jersey was pulled over on the Verrazzano Bridge for trying to using his “friend” as a reason to use the HOV lane. (Gothamist)

The photos your friends post to Instagram from Storm King are nice and all, but have you thought about who’s job it is to mow the grass? Meet Mike Seaman, who leads a seven-person crew. (NY Times)

Much like Williamsburg, the neighborhood it calls home, the Feast of Our Lady Mount Carmel and San Paolino di Nola is changing with the times. For the first time organizers opened up the carrying of the giglio, a four-ton and 72-foot-tall spire, and a life-size sculpture of a boat, to outsiders. This Sunday is giglio Sunday. (NY Times)

Irving Plaza is closed for eight months to be renovated. (EV Grieve)

The city provides about 146 square feet of green space per resident, which is smaller than a 12 foot by 12-foot room. Of the fifteen major cities in the story, New York was dead last. (Patch)

Speaking of green space, Shirley Chisholm State Park can lay claim to the title of “the city’s nicest park built on top of a toxic dump.” (Curbed)

In reflection of its 20th year, Untapped Cities sat down with Friends of the High Line co-founder Robert Hammond to discuss his favorite places in the city, future public projects, the Spur, and more. (Untapped Cities)

The latest step in a neighbor-feud in Kew Gardens is a bloody splattered mannequin who seems to be daring neighbors to call 311 against it. A truly amazing amount of pettiness. (Gothamist)

The expansion of the city’s speed camera program kicked off this week. The city will add 40-60 cameras a month until the number reaches 750 from the current 140. (Curbed)

“Slave Play,” a look at race relations through the prism of the sexual hangups of three interracial couples, is coming to Broadway this spring and will run for 17 weeks. (NY Times)

The reunited The Misfits announced their first-ever show at Madison Square Garden, tickets are on sale next week. (BrooklynVegan)

How Darren Walker, a gay black man who grew up poor in Texas, came to be one of the best-connected people in New York City. And what that means for the future of philanthropy. (NY Times)

A photo gallery of Coney Island through the years. (amNY)

The Parks Department publicly apologized to the family of Robert Sommer, who was one of the fifteen cyclists killed by drivers this year, for removing his memorial ghost bike in Marine Park without notifying his family first. (Brooklyn Paper)

Would you pay $275 to be a guest on a podcast? Say what you want, but it’s working for Uluç Ülgen, the host of mürmur, a podcast that is “part performance art, part social documentary, part mystical, and part comedy.” If you don’t want to pay the fee to appear, you can always subscribe on iTunes. (Bedford + Bowery)

A taxi jumped the curb and crashed into a Westville in Hell’s Kitchen on Ninth Avenue Westville. Five people were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries and three declined medical attention. No reason was released for the driver’s actions. (Gothamist)

The Washington Square Park “Die-In” to bring attention to the crisis created by the failures of the mayor’s Vision Zero program has worked. Nearly every media outlet in the city has written about it, and it has now received the New York Times treatment. (NY Times)

More and more people in Brooklyn and Queens are choosing to renew their leases instead of moving to new apartments. Rants in both boroughs are up, but rents in Queens are down 4.2% since May. (The Real Deal)

Mia Simmons, the 20-year-old woman charged with manslaughter for the stabbing death of 30-year-old Latanya Watson, was defending herself according to her lawyer. Video footage shows the pair fighting on the platform and Simmons’s lawyer claims Watson was the aggressor. (Gothamist)

An Ed Sheeran pop-up shop will be open on Wooster Street today from 3:06 through 9:06. Now you know where to go or where to avoid, depending who you are. (amNY)

Say hello to the Carrot Dog, the humane twist on the New York staple, which are now available ay by CHLOE. Delightful, disgusting, or both? (Gothamist)

Whoops, the Time Out Market in Dumbo was shut down by the Department of Health. The food hall is expected to be reopened shortly. (Eater)

The MTA’s rules restrict the kinds of secondary jobs its workers can hold, which three dozen violated by moonlighting as Lyft /Uber drivers without agency permission. Five were fired. (Patch)

The governor won’t sign a bill that would loosen restrictions on affidavit ballots that would also retroactively decide the contested Queens DA race. (Jackson Heights Post)

After the arrest of Tyresse Singleton for the alleged burning of rainbow flags outside the Alibi Lounge in Harlem, a new set of flags are proudly waving. (amNY)

A look inside the bribery and corruption of two men who are partially responsible for the current taxi medallion financial crisis. (NY Times)

Everyone has a friend who always chooses the most expensive restaurant possible and the bill for the eight of you looks like someone’s rent instead of a bill for the meal. That’s the inspiration behind the list of the best restaurants for affordable group dinners. (The Infatuation)

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