The Briefly for October 2-3, 2020 – The “Vaccinate All Your Trash Pandas” Friday Edition

The latest NYC news digest: Indoor dining, indoor schooling, the Brooklyn ballot blunder, NYSC gets sued, Kora’s doughnuts go pop-up, outdoor movies, and more

Today – Low: 54˚ High: 67˚
Possible drizzle in the morning.
This weekend – Low: 51˚ High: 67˚

If you’re one of the nearly 100,000 people who received incorrect ballots, the Board of Elections is sending you a few ballot. The Board of Elections is not doing much to earn our confidence in the last few years. (Brigid Bergin for Gothamist)

How’d the ballots get so screwed up? Blame Phoenix Graphics, the company hired to produce the ballots, which has historically supported Republicans and was paid $4.6 million to bungle our ballots, so to speak. (Clifford Michel for The City)

A look into the Brooklyn Psychedelic Society, and no, they do not provide drugs at their meetings. (Diana Kruzman for Bedford + Bowery)

A group of assholes from the Upper West Side rallied for the mayor to remove 240 homeless New Yorkers from their neighborhood and the mayor gave them what they wanted. The plan is to move them into a new shelter in the Financial District. Now, of course, there is a new group of assholes in the Financial District demanding they be moved elsewhere. (Tribeca Citizen)

The city is launching its annual campaign to vaccinate… the population of raccoons in the city against rabies. If you find your pet eating something that looks like a brown ketchup packet filled with a pink liquid, do your best to take it away from them, but it should not be harmful to them. (Liena Zagare for Bklyner)

There are ten neighborhoods in the city with positive Covid-19 testing rates above 3%, adding Fresh Meadows and Hillcrest to the already existing list. There are seven neighborhoods, East Williamsburg, Bed-Stuy, Windsor Terrace, Brighton Beach, Crown Heights, Rego Park and Jamaica Hills whose numbers are getting close to 3%. (Alehandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

An interactive map of Covid-19 cases. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that people who refuse to wear masks will be fined up to $1,000. Does this extend to police officers? There were zero fines issued on the first day of enforcement. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle)

The city’s plans to test 10-20% of each school every two weeks may miss large outbreaks of the virus according to a new student from NYU and recommends that half of every school be tested twice a month in order to catch outbreaks before they quickly spread out of control. (Benedict Carey, James Glanz and Eliza Shapiro for NY Times)

John F. Kennedy Jr. School in Elmhurst is the first NYC school to shut down for two weeks after two positive Covid-19 cases. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

“I keep saying there appears to be a real separation between what’s happening in the neighborhoods versus what’s happening in the public schools that really do have a different constituency.” – That was Mayor de Blasio before the positive tests in Elmhurst that shut down John F. Kennedy Jr. School and 100% contradicted this sentiment. He also said “We did it!” talking about opening the schools, words he would immediately come to regret if he were capable of shame. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

Before schools opened, Mayor de Blasio said that children that were unwilling or unable to be tested for Covid-19 would be moved into 100% remote learning. He has backed down on that claim. (Christina Veiga for Chalkbeat)

Schools are still open across the city, but a single day spike of positive test results at 3.25% is waking people up to the realizing that it’s possible for the city to hit the 3% seven-day average tripwire that would shut down all schools. (Elizabeth Kim for Gothamist)

Keep your eyes out for special pennies. Jill Magid is releasing 120,000 pennies into the world as part of her project “Tender,” in which each penny has “The body was already so fragile” engraved on their side. (Allie Conti for NY Times)

NYPD officer Eduardo Vite from East Harlem’s 25th precinct was arrested for beating and pulling a gun on his girlfriend. Vite has a history of alleged domestic violence and proven complaints of on-duty misconduct. He is facing an internal investigation and remains on the force. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The NYPD committed violations of international human rights laws during the June 4 protests, according to a new report by Human Rights Watch. (Ese Olumhense for The City)

Minutes after Governor Andrew Cuomo implored local governments to rethink the role of police in public safety after mass protests against racist police brutality, Cuomo said police officers should arrest people injecting drugs on city streets during a Tuesday press conference. (Sydney Pereira and Quari Alleyne for Gothamist)

James W. Cahill, president of the New York State Building & Construction Trades Council, was indicted on racketeering and fraud charges along with ten current and former members of the steamfitters Local 638. (Benjamin Weiser and Jesse McKinley for NY Times)

It’s the last few days of Century 21, if you think you’re gonna find a deal, get ready to wait in line. (NY1)

Indoor dining is (sort of) back in NYC. How nervous should you be about it? (Pete Wells for NY Times)

How to spot the risks of indoor dining. (Also Pete Wells for NY Times)

The mayor did not eat indoors on the first night of its availability. (Erika Adams for Eater)

“Overall, the restaurants where I ate, and the many others into which I popped my head during my tour, were operating well under the mandated 25% capacity. In fact, most dining rooms everywhere remained nearly empty even as their outdoor space filled up, perhaps not surprising given the exceptionally pleasant weather yesterday evening, not to mention the whole fear of catching a terrible contagious disease thing.”
-Scott Lynch, I Ate Inside A NYC Restaurant. This Is My Story for Gothamist

A last meal at Mission Chinese. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Some bars and restaurants are fighting back against the state SLA and winning, including Lucky in the East Village. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

Say farewell to the Islanders, who have played their last game in Brooklyn and will return to Long Island next season. (JT Torenli for Brooklyn Eagle)

Is it possible that America’s best bathroom is in Greely Square? Maybe it’s in the JFK AirTrain station? Both have been nominated. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

“We, the undersigned WSN Fall 2020 Editorial Staff, have collectively decided to resign from Washington Square News, effective immediately. This was extensively deliberated in collaboration with 43 staff editors, and it was not a decision we enjoyed making. However, we understand that continuing to work at WSN in our current circumstance would do more harm than good, and we refuse to condone what we have seen over the past three weeks.”
-Washington Square News Staff, We’re Resigning from WSN. Here’s Why. for Washington Square News

Queens Filipino bakery Kora is having a pop-up this weekend, featuring their innovative and extremely hard to get your hands on doughnuts. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Apartment Porn: This Hell’s Kitchen condo has a rooftop pool, a pocket park, a dog run, a library, and two guest suites. Apartments start at $910k for a studio. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

New York Sports Club is being sued for fraud by the Letitia James’s Attorney General office after it illegally charged customers fees during its legally mandated Covid-19 shutdown and then failed to issue reimbursements. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

11 spots showing outdoor movies. I suggest Parklife on Wednesday nights, where you’ll find me hosting trivia before the movie, even if The Infatuation didn’t mention me I’m still linking to them! (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

Thanks to reader Christopher V. for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for July 29, 2020 – The “11% of NYPD Officers Have a Record of Misconduct” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Industry City’s rezoning is dead, Revel is on pause, where to eat in Chinatown, Trash Panda Park, Cuomo fights for control over the city, and more

Today – Low: 77˚ High: 89˚
Clear throughout the day.

Governor Cuomo is expanding his oversight on the city and its finances via three nominations to the seven-member Financial Control Board, which has oversight over the city’s budget. He’s nominated allies to the board and stated he’s looking to scrutinize the city’s fiscal outlook. Other board members are State Comptroller Tom Napoli, Mayor de Blasio, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, and Governor Cuomo. (Zack Fink for NY1)

While Governor Cuomo is fighting to hold more control over the city, the State Legislature is fighting to take control away from Governor Cuomo, seeking to limit his power over the state’s budget. The Budget Equality Act, which hasn’t been voted on yet, would allow the legislature to add to the budget in addition to its powers right now, which only allow a reduction in spending. A change would require an amendment to the state’s constitution, so this will become a multi-year fight. (Ben Brachfeld for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: It has a 1,000 bottle wine room, a 1,200 square-foot terrace, an outdoor kitchen, and 6,400 square feet of space. All yours in Tribeca for the low, low price of $17.5 million. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

After two recent deaths, Revel has indefinitely suspended its service and review its safety measures in the city. The mayor called this “an unacceptable state of affairs.” Just imagine what he could actually get accomplished if the mayor stepped in when a system within the city is obviously broken and causing pain and suffering on a wide-spread basis. It should be noted that Revel has operated since 2018 and these two are the first reported deaths. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

1 out of ever 9 NYPD officers has a confirmed record of misconduct.3,796 out of 36,000 have at least one substantiated complaint against them. Most have received no penalty at all. (Christopher Robbins, George Joseph, Jake Offenhartz, Zach Gottehrer-Cohen, and Jake Dobkin for Gothamist)

Unsatisfied that Portland get all the country’s attention for people being grabbed off the street, the NYPD has decided to get in on the action. NYPD officers grabbed 18-year-old Nikki Stone tossing her into an unmarked Kia minivan. Reports indicate she’s since been released. (Allyson Chiu for The Washington Post)

91 percent of public drinking tickets in the last six months went to Black and Latinx New Yorkers. Is anyone surprised? (Luke Fortney for Eater)

“With the Senate back in Washington working on another COVID-19 relief package, we at the MTA are fending off a fiscal tsunami. We’re simply trying to survive the rest of this year, and the next one, with our finances mostly intact. But to do that, we need help and we need it now – in the form of another $4 billion in federal aid to get through 2020.”
-Patrick Foye, Chairman and CEO of the MTA, MTA fiscal tsunami requires federal relief for Bronx Times

A little look at NYC’s history using augmented reality. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York)

The history of animals in Central Park from the goat-drawn carriages to Hattie the snowplow elephant to the camels that helped plow the soil for planting. (Sam Neubauer for I Love The Upper West Side)

The city has suspended its brown bin composting program, but the LES Ecology Center is rolling out a phased reopening of food scrap drop-off sites with a few sites accepting scraps. (Tequila Minsky for amNewYork Metro)

The Yankees’ second game in two days was postponed while MLB tries to come to grips with the outbreak in the Marlins’ locker room. (Joe Pantorno for amNewyork Metro)

Governor Cuomo made the offer that New York state hosts the games for any MLB team that wants to play them, boasting the state’s infection rate is currently below 1%. For players, Cuomo would carve out a new exception from his out of state quarantine rules. (Zack Fink for NY1)

Illinois, Kentucky, Minnesota, DC, and Puerto Rico were all added to New York’s quarantine list, bringing the total up to 34 states. (Matt Troutman for Patch)

I nominate that Riverside Park be renamed Trash Panda Park after racoons have taken over. (Mike Mishkin for I Love The Upper West Side)

The Industry City rezoning is dead. City Councilmember Carlos Menchaca is the deciding vote when it comes to the proposal and he has come out in strong opposition to it. Menchaca has laid out multiple conditions for his support and he says they were not met. ITs only hope is that Speaker Corey Johnson step in to rally the council against Menchaca, which seems unlikely. (Kathryn Brenzel for The Real Deal)

A moment of cute! A duck built a nest on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The staff is keeping an eye on it and the new family will be moved to Central Park when they’re ready to leave. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

“I don’t think this is the type of job we should just ‘wing it,’ and that’s the sense I’ve been getting sometimes.” The city’s contact tracing program is not off to a great start. (Sharon Offerman for NY Times)

Mayor de Blasio says that unless the federal government’s new stimulus package includes more state aid, the city will be forced to layoff up to 22,000 workers. These are the jobs that he said could be saved with if the city can successfully renegotiate worker contracts with unions by October 1. (Alejandra O’Connell-Domenech for amNewYork Metro)

Thinking about heading to Long Island to go to the beach to avoid the city’s beaches? Good luck with those sharks. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

12 more bars have had their liquor licenses suspended by the State Liquor Authority, mostly in Jackson Heights, bringing the total to 29. (Tanay Warerkar for Eater)

For almost $1,000 you can enjoy a three-night stay in the Wythe Hotel, complete with a movie or TV show screening in the hotel’s private screening room. They’ll even throw in popcorn for free. (Shaye Weaver for Time Out)

A federal judge granted a preliminary injunction instructing New York State to begin unemployment payments to Uber and Lyft drivers immediately and promptly. (Noam Scheiber for NY Times)

Where to eat outside in Chintatown. (Hannah Albertine for The Infatuation)

The Briefly for November 21, 2019 – The “Raccoons Take Control, De Blasio’s MTA Influence Weakens” Edition

The best falafel, the city pays out $1 billion in lawsuits annually, Corey Johnson continues the tradition of playing politics with the budget, and more in today’s daily NYC digest.

Trash pandas rule the city’s parks at night, but now they are turning their little bandit-faced gaze towards becoming the kinds of the subterranean. Raccoon-related subway delays are up this year, way up. (Gothamist)

Let’s call it The Great Bell Blvd Oil Heist. The NYPD arrested Nigeme Rowe for stealing used oil from restaurants that put out the oil for recycling companies to be turned into biodiesel. (QNS)

The Daily News’ owners sold 25% of the company to the Tribune Company, the “destroyer of newspapers.” Sound promising. (Patch)

The city has paid $84.5 million annually to the victims of traffic violence caused by city employees in the Departments of Fire, Sanitation, Police, Transportation, and Parks. Add in all claims against the city? The number balloons to $1 billion. (Streetsblog)

The candy vendor arrested in a Harlem subway station last week plans to sue the city for $5 million for excessive force used by the four police officers who arrested him. (amNewYork)

The Queens DA will release its internal “credibility database” of cops who are suspected of lying in court. (Gothamist)

Are there enough places to buy coffee in NYC? Bandit is a new company that plans to open a coffee stand where you can buy a cup via their app with their eventual goal to be within a five minute walk from anyone who wants coffee. (Eater)

Broadway is Broadway, but Off Broadway, Off-Off Broadway and smaller theaters far beyond still has a strong economical presence. Non-Broadway theater generates $584 million annually and employs 3,000 people according to a new study form the mayor’s office. (NY Times)

Five holiday decoration tips for small spaces, including the very sad “put branches in the shape of a tree on your wall.” (StreetEasy)

Lyft and the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) announced the formation of a new Equity Advisory Board for Citi Bike to discuss and evaluate Citi Bike’s equity strategy to better serve New York. (Curbed)

This look back at the history of 57th St starts with the quintessential Manhattan question: “Does anyone actually want to go to Midtown?” (Gothamist)

13 Brooklyn condos with the best waterfront views. (6sqft)

The case for ending free parking in NYC is getting stronger. (NY Times)

Here are the things that New Yorkers are looking for when they search for a new home. Here’s a hint: low crime and good light. (Localize Labs)

Add another name to the great fried chicken fight of 2019. From Philly, the latest contestant is Starliner in Bushwick. (Gothamist)

Evictions are down in Manhattan, Staten Island, Brooklyn, and Queens, but not in the Bronx according to a new report issued by NYU’s Furman Center. (Welcome2TheBronx)

The Times is searching for stories about your neighborhood bodega. (NY Times)

Is your regular hookup becoming “a thing?” Here’s where to go when you’re not sure that your friend with benefits might want to have the “what ARE we?” talk. (The Infatuation)

Mayor de Blasio’s influence over the MTA is diminishing as one of his appointees, Veronica Vanterpool, is resigning from the MTA’s board. Vanterpool was also the youngest board member at 44 and its only woman of color. (Politico)

The MTA’s automated bus-mounted camera ticketing system is coming to the 14th St busway and will be online on December 2 and for the first sixty days, drivers will only receive a warning. (Gothamist)

Ten city zip codes are among the United States’ most expensive when it comes to home prices at numbers 5 and 8, respectively. Tribeca and Hudson Square broke through to the top ten. (Patch)

It seems that as long as you say you “didn’t realize” you hit and killed someone with your car, the NYPD will absolve you of wrongdoing. (Streetsblog)

A second New Yorker has died due to a vaping-related illness. (Patch)

More than two dozen homes in Dyker Heights have begun their annual Christmas light transformation. (Brooklyn Paper)

In September of 2018, the Department of Sanitation begun parking garbage trucks overnight on 10th between 1st and 2nd, which quite honestly sucks for the people who live on that block. It took 14 months, but State Senator Brad Hoylman and State Assemblymember Deborah J. Glick have introduced a bill that will prevent the DSNY from parking on residential streets. As a result, the DSNY has decided to move its trucks to Pier 42 for the next three months. (EV Grieve)

Starting next year, some buildings in the city will be required to display a letter grade, similar to restaurants, showing how energy efficient they are. (NY Times)

Is Corey Johnson using the City Council’s budget to reward his allies and make political deals? Yes. Has this been common practice in the City Council for long before Corey Johnson because the speaker? Also yes. (Politico)

NYC needs more weird, like Mother Pigeon, the bird woman artist and animal rights advocate who makes acrylic pigeon sculptures and sets them up in Union Square. (Viewing NYC)

Inside a celebration of Fet Gede in Downtown Brooklyn, the Haitian voodoo Festival of the Dead. (NY Times)

The best falafel in NYC. (Grub Street)

Thank you to MG Ashdown for today’s featured photo!