The Briefly for January 26, 2020 – The “Isn’t A Dessert Bagel Called A Doughnut?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: Andy Byford’s replacement pushed for the 500 subway cops, a $20,000/month apartment in Nolita, our hero Jane Jacobs, where to eat in Staten Island, and more

Today – Low: 44˚ High: 50˚
Rain and windy overnight.

State Assemblymember Nicole Malliotakis, a Republican, is asking the Trump administration to try to kill congestion pricing. Malliotakis, of course, represents Bay Ridge and Staten Island. (Alex Williamson for Brooklyn Eagle)

An interview with Dermot Shea, Mayor de Blasio’s new republican NYPD Commissioner, who won’t say if he voted for Trump in 2016. (Jeff Coltin for City and State)

Meet Efren Andaluz, the artist who painted the Kobe and Gianna tribute mural near the Barclays Center. (Kimmy Dole for Hiplanta)

Andy Byford’s temporary replacement is someone who led the push for more subway cops, MTA board member Sarah Feinberg. Her focus while on the board has been quality of life issues and homelessness. Feinberg oversaw the Federal Railroad Administration when a series of explosive oil train derailments and deadly commuter railroad crashes made headlines during the Obama administration. (Stephen Nessen, Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

See hundreds of pieces of Seneca Village artifacts online through the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission website. (Gabe Herman for amNewYork Metro)

Brooklyn Public Library’s University Open Air kicks off this week, offering 25 college-level courses for free from an international staff. (Colin Mixson for Brooklyn Paper)

The city has health with the homelessness crisis like it’s something to be managed, not solved. Can NYC actually fix its homeless crisis? (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

Photos: Inside Porto Rico, opened in 1907 and one of the city’s oldest coffee stores. (Noah Sheidlower, Photos by Nicole Saraniero for Untapped New York)

A dessert bagel? (Juan Vidal for Grub Street)

If you drop something on the subway tracks, don’t try to get it yourself. Two people have been hit by the 6 train at Astor Place this week while trying to get something that dropped onto the tracks. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

On his way to jail after his rape conviction, Harvey Weinstein was re-routed to Bellevue Medical Center with heart palpitations, pain, and high blood pressure. Once he’s discharged, he’ll be headed to Rikers Island. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

Looking for a bit of green for your apartment? The 10 best plants for apartment dwellers. (Rebecca Paul for 6sqft)

Apartment Porn: A $20,000/month 3,175 square foot rental in Nolita. (Dana Schulz for 6sqft)

Amazon could buy the former Lord & Taylor building from WeWork for $1 billion. (Alexandra Alexa for 6sqft)

A look back at the birth of The Committee to Save the West Village, led by Jane Jacobs, who history has proven to be the hero compared to Robert Moses. (Ariel Kates for GVSHP)

Photos: Inside the “morgue” of The New York Times. (Michelle Young for Untapped New York)

Goodbye Burger Heaven, after 77 years the Upper East Side diner is closing and going to diner heaven, blaming “delivery culture” on its demise. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street)

The MTA is moving forward on purchasing nearly 1,000 “open-gangway” subway cars. (Michelle Cohen for 6sqft)

& Sons is a new ham bar in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens. Wait, a ham bar? (Nikita Richardson for Grub Street)

Alligators in the sewers of New York City? Here’s the truth. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

Governors Island has an opening date for the summer: May 1. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

RIP Michael Hertz, designer of the current subway map. (Neil Genzlinger for NY Times)

Salt Bae’s new burger restaurant, like the Salt Bae himself, seems like a giant joke that isn’t funny. Recently his parent company has been sued for sexual harassment and wage theft. (Erika Adams for Eater)

Where to eat in Staten Island, which Eater calls “a low-key culinary paradise.” (Claire Elisabeth for Eater)

“Saddest moment of my week, watching it roll onto the track seconds before the train pulled up.”

Thank you to reader Maiya for today’s featured photo and sad story.

The Briefly for February 20, 2020 – The “A Diner by Any Other Name” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: “The Joy Goddess” of Harlem, the Lowline is dead, the best cocktail bars, Myles makes its NYC app debut, Lyft’s electric bikes are back and more

Today – Low: 22˚ High: 38˚
Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

A look at A’Lelia Walker, daughter of Madam C.J. Walker, who 100 years ago in Harlem was given the nickname of “the Joy Goddess” by Langston Hughes, and whose parties and events provided a central location for the Harlem Renaissance. Part of a series by The Root focusing on little-known or forgotten rebels, celebrating Black History Month. (Anne Branigin for The Root)

Mayor Bloomberg started off his debate night getting ruined by Elizabeth Warren. The rest of the night didn’t go so great for him either. (John F. Harris for Politico)

A timeline of Michael Bloomberg’s support of stop and frisk. (Maggie Astor for NY Times)

The Lowline, once an extremely cool idea of putting a Highline style park in an abandoned trolley terminal in the Lower East Side, is dead. After more than a decade of work, the project is out of money. (Bowery Boogie)

Let’s grapple with an existential question for a moment: Is the Soho Diner really a diner? In Robert Sietsema’s review, he points towards no, with food choices pointing more towards “Top Chef” than “greasy spoon.” The desserts earned a compliment, but those are from Petee’s Pies and not made in house. Is a diner by name still a diner? (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

Myles is a new ride-hailing app available this week in NYC. The company claims rides will be 10% cheer than Lyft and Uber on average and they won’t make use of surge pricing. (Igor Bonifacic for Engadget)

Say hello to Eugene Hernandez, the new director of the New York Film Festival. (Sara Aridi for NY Times)

The MTA is betting $15 billion of its $51 billion 2020 – 2024 capital plan on the Trump Administration giving congestion pricing the go ahead and not delaying the 2021 rollout. If there is a delay or a call for an environmental impact study, congestion pricing won’t start on time and the MTA would likely have to borrow money, eventually leading to a transit financial disaster. (Dave Colon for Streetsblog)

Lyft’s pedal-assisted electric bikes are finally back, after being pulled out of commission in April 2019 for malfunctioning brakes and batteries. (Tina Bellon for amNewYork Metro)

Chairnobyl? Chairnobyl. (EV Grieve)

NYC’s best under-the-radar museums, mapped. (Ameena Walker for Curbed)

This ain’t the piercing pagoda kiosk in the mall. A “hole new you” is ht promise of the new piercing studio Studs in Nolita. (Lindsay Tuchman for NY1)

The NYPD arrested a 14-year-old, the third and final suspect in the killing of 18-year-old Barnard College student Tessa Majors on Wednesday. (JB Nicholas for Gothamist)

Apartment Porn: Take a look inside the ex-WeWork CEO’s three-story $27.5 million Gramercy Park apartment. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed)

John Ciero, a former NYPD officer, is among five people indicted in federal court for dealing meth and a date rape drug called GBL, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Southern District of New York announced on Wednesday. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist)

New York City’s first weed dummies are arriving in Queens. Of course, you need to have a prescription to get them for the moment. (Jacob Kaye for QNS)

Here are the new protected bike lanes coming to Manhattan this year. From the plan, it looks like you’ll finally be able to bike around the perimeter of Manhattan completely in 2021. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

This story of a parrot who got loose in Manhattan, is frankly amazing. (Emily Flitter for NY Times)

Plush seating and carpets. That sounds like a good idea for the subways, right? (Jen Carlson for Gothamist)

Citywide alternate side parking tickets will be increasing from $45 to $65 starting today. I used to live in Park Slope and my upstairs neighbor never moved his car for ASP because if he never moved his car and just paid the tickets once a week, he was still going to pay less than if he put his car in any garage in the neighborhood for the month. At $65, three tickets a month is still cheaper than any garage. (Kristen Torres for Sunnyside Post)

James Dolan has won more legal victories over former-Knicks star Charles Oakley than the actual Knicks have won championships over anyone. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

The West Side Story revival has been met with protests, as demonstrators have been calling for Amar Ramasar’s removal from the cast because of his role in a photo-sharing scandal at City Ballet. (Julia Jacobs for NY Times)

Chirlane McCray, Mayor de Blasio’s wife, launched a podcast called “Thrive with Chirlane McCray” on the Brooklyn Free Speech podcast network and we are all paying for it. The podcast is funded by Thrive NYC, which has received $850 million in taxpayer funds. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

Do you know about “The Atlantic Ticket?” That’s a LIRR ticket that allows you to go from one of Brooklyn’s three stops to Jamaica, Hollis, Queens Village, Locust Manor, St. Albans, Laurelton or Rosedale for only $5. The success of this ticket is renewing calls that traveling within the city on the LIRR should cost $2.75. (Jose Martinez and Trone Dowd for The City)

Happy the elephant, who resides in the Bronx Zoo, does not have human-like rights and does not have to be transferred to a sanctuary. (NY1)

Believe it or not, there are people that live in the Financial District, and those people showed up in force to show their support against the creators of Sleep No More getting a liquor license at a Manhattan Community Board 1 licensing committee meeting. The new show is looking to set up shop in a mostly residential building. The NIMBYs voted against recommending a liquor license be granted and the proposal goes to a full vote of the community board next week, and the State Liquor Authority only uses community board votes as guidance, so it’s still possible the show moves forward as planned. (Ben Brachfield for Gothamist)

RIP Swamp Trump. We hardly knew ye. (Scott Enman for Brooklyn Eagle)

NYC’s top cocktail bars. (Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner for Eater)

thanks to reader Jacqueline for today’s featured photo!

The Briefly for February 5, 2020 – The “Why Bother Having A Public Transit System At All?” Edition

Today’s daily NYC news digest: The Upper West Side asks for a study on street parking, the five best bacon dishes, the NYPD blames a jump in crime on the latest boogeyman, and more

Today – Low: 37˚ High: 44˚
Light rain in the morning and overnight.

A not completely accurate comic portrayal of New York’s zoos. (@pixelatedboat)

Here’s the full list of Catholic clergy accused of sex abuse in NYC. (Adam Nichols for Patch)

29 things that are regular here and weird almost anywhere else. (Mary Lane for New York Cliche)

Andy Byford’s last day on the job for the New York Transit Authority will be February 22 and advocates are starting to get worried about the MTA’s ability to move forward without him. (Mark Hallum for amNewYork Metro)

The MTA is seeking proposals from ride-hailing services to help service transit deserts better by adding cars to bring people to the nearest subway stop during the hours of midnight and 5am. The details are nearly non-existent, like price and what locations would be served, but it’s a start. (Jose Martinez and Trone Dowd for The City)

Transit advocates are less than impressed with the MTA’s potential plan to subsidize for-hire car rides. Rather than address a real issue with transit availability, the MTA is punting to cabs to fill in the gaps it created. How long until the MTA uses this as an excuse to further cut back on night and weekend service? (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist)

The city is working on a pilot program to bring a potential 5,000 basement apartments up to code in East New York, but at the same time they are also cracking down on illegal basement apartments elsewhere. (Kevin Sun for The Real Deal)

Robert Sietsema’s top five bacon dishes across the city. (Robert Sietsema for Eater)

What’s the top hotel in the city? Was your pick The Lowell Hotel New York on 62nd? According to US News and Reports, it’s #1. Check out the rest of the top ten. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Renderings: Check out what the pedestrian plaza will look like outside Grand Central this summer. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft)

Does a perfect carrot cake exist? Does it come from Lloyd’s Carrot Cake in Riverdale? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx)

The train that lost power between Secaucus and Penn Station left New Jersey at 6pm and didn’t arrive at Penn Station until 10pm for a ride that usually takes 15 minutes. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist)

17 hidden gems in Flushing. (Noah Sheidlower for Untapped New York)

All hail Pizza Rat, the unofficial subway mascot. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist)

New York’s tourism industry is taking a hard hit from the lack of Chinese tourists around the city, representing the second-largest foreign travelers in the world. (James Barron for NY Times)

The first person showing signs of coronavirus symptoms does not have coronavirus. The other two people showing symptoms have not been given a diagnosis. (Joseph Goldstein for NY Times)

The Knicks fired their team president Steve Mills. Whoever takes the job for James Dolan next will either become a very wealthy person or the biggest idiot in the NBA. (Joe Pantorno for amNewYork Metro)

Kids born later in the year are up to 70% more likely to be diagnosed as having a learning disability by the city’s public schools according to a new data analysis from the Independent Budget Office. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

It’s an inclusive sauna on wheels, and yes, it’s in Bushwick. (Collier Sutter for Time Out)

The NYPD isn’t supposed to talk about public policy, so why are they opening their mouths about bail reform? Oh right, because they police themselves and basically feel like they can do almost anything they want. (Christopher Robbins for Gothamist)

January saw a 20% drop in murder, a 24% drop in hate crimes and an 18% drop in rape, but the overall volume of crime was up 17% compared to last January. The Police Benevolent Association’s Pat Lynch has decided this overall jump can be blamed on the NYPD’s latest boogeyman: bail reform. With the reforms being on the books for one month, it is impossible to make a direct connection between the two. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch)

Incidents of slashings and stabbings in city jails surged 10.4 percent last year and physical confrontations between detainees and corrections officers rose sharply to a staggering 37 percent—and the City Council Committee on Criminal Justice is trying to find out why. (Matthew Benedetti for NY City Lens)

The NYPD is phasing out its activity log memo books in favor of an iPhone app. The books have been in use since the 1800s and the new app will centralize the information and leave less room for fudging the facts. (Corey Kilgannon for NY Times)

22 go-to fast casual spots in the Financial District. (Urvija Banerji for Eater)

Brooklyn Bridge Park has new a public art installation at Pier 3. The large metal hoops are called “New York Clearing” by Antony Gormley and I’m going to withhold my judgement on this until I experience it firsthand, because it’s looking a little weird in the photos. (Gabe Herman amNewYork Metro)

An adult tree house is coming to this luxury Lower East Side high-rise. Of course it is. (Howard Halle for Time Out)

It took eight months, two closed-door sessions, and an hour of debate on the last night, but Community Board 7 on the Upper West Side has asked the city for a study curbside usage on the Upper West Side and explores the idea of paid residential parking permits. Eight months. (Eve Kessler for Streetsblog)

“The usual?” 26 restaurants where you’ll want to become a regular. (Hannah Albertine, Bryan Kim, & Matt Tervooren for The Infatuation)