The Briefly for September 6, 2019 – The “NYC Rodent Murder Sludge Bucket” Edition

A drag queen runs for City Council, ConEd gets yelled at, city beaches are prematurely closed, don’t trust the free subway wifi, and more in today’s daily NYC news update

This weekend’s subway service changes and disruptions are few in number, but the trains that are hit, are hit hard. Expect problems getting around on the 2, 6, J, N, R and SIR. (Subway Weekender)

Someone set up a makeshift stage for the mayor to drop out of the presidential race outside of the Park Slope YMCA. It’s not a bad strategy to get the mayor’s attention, he spends more time at the YMCA than he does at City Hall. (Brooklyn Paper)

Meet Deborah Lauter, the head of the city’s new Office for the Prevention of Hate Crimes. (NY Times)

Is the city ready for its first drag queen on city council? Marti Gould Allen-Cummings thinks so and plans to run in Manhattan District 7. (amNY)

A death box full of sludge and dead rats. Welcome to Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams’s new “hygienic, humane, and sustainable” mass-murder bucket. (Splinter)

Eric Garner’s family still has a lot of unanswered questions about his death, including why he was charged with a felony cigarette sale charge when it requires 10,000 cigarettes or more to be applicable or why the police report said no force was used. Pantaleo is fired, but the family is pushing forward to seek broader justice. (The Indypendent)

The guitarist of the band Piss Factory settles into his new role: the heir to a tofu dynasty. (NY Times)

Yeah, you love karaoke, but do you love it enough to run a karaoke den out of your home? (Bedford + Bowery)

A look at why subway tile is so classic and how it’s evolving. (StreetEasy)

Do you know about the Pratt Cats and the history behind the cat houses on campus? (Untapped Cities)

Where to eat after a run in Central Park (but also after you take a shower, right?) (The Infatuation)

Neopolitan, St. Louis, Chicago, Detroit Sicilian, and more. Where to find regional pizza styles in the city. (amNY)

City beaches are closed Friday and Saturday because of Hurricane Dorian-related conditions, ruining two of the three last days of beach season. Bummer. (Patch)

If you’re already missing summer, this split-screen video showing 100 years of history in Coney Island will have you feeling the sand in your shoes. (The New Yorker)

Photos from inside the 6,000-square-foot Artechouse, the space under Chelsea Market dedicated to new media artwork. (Untapped Cities)

29 fall restaurants openings you need to know about. (Grub Street)

He’s already got ethics charges against him, what’s a few more? The City Council Standards and Ethics Committee found evidence of conflict-of-interest violations and retaliation against staff members by Andy King, a council member from the Bronx. A closed-door hearing will be held September 13 for all charges. (Patch)

2019 has already seen more than twice the number of cyclists killed by drivers as in 2018. Mayor de Blasio’s natural instinct is to consider introducing new regulations for cyclists, not drivers. (Curbed)

Are you someone who finds satisfaction in watching something get clean? Watch the Museum of Natural History clean its 92-foot, 21,000-pound white whale and relax. (American Museum of Natural History)

ConEd sent people to get yelled at by City Council over this summer’s power outages. (Gothamist)

How to spend a day in Bushwick. (amNY)

Norm’s Pizza, a new pizza shop in Downtown Brooklyn, is the unholy marriage of the owners of dollar-slice 2 Bros. and the former Roberta’s pizzaiolo turned pizza consultant Anthony Falco. (Eater)

Must-see theater coming to the city’s stages this fall. (amNY)

Photos: ‘Meet Me in the Bathroom: The Art Show’ (Brooklyn Vegan)

At least four former city council members are considering running for their old seats after they were term-limited out. (Politico)

All the ways your information can be stolen while using the free wifi in a subway station. (amNY)

The hottest brunch spots in NYC. (Eater)

Thanks to reader Louisa for today’s featured photo.

The Briefly for August 29, 2019 – The “Fried Chicken Sandwich Ridiculousness Ends This Week” Edition

The police union calls for de Blasio and O’Neill’s removal, 15 trendy restaurants you can get into, security measures for the West Indian Day Parade, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

A ban on foie gras is working its way through the city council and could come up for a vote in the fall. More than half of the council has so-sponsored the bill and it has support from the mayor, but there are questions about the ability to enforce the bill. (NY Times)

Despite the ever-changing nature of the city, Gem Spa is swimming upstream on the corner of St. Marks and 2nd Ave in a struggle to survive. (NY Times)

New construction can’t stop the rats. (Bowery Boogie)

This week ends the Popeye’s fried chicken sandwich frenzy that took over August, as all locations will be completely sold out of the sandwich. (Grub Street)

Google Pigeon is turning to crowdsourcing to solve real-time public transit information, kinda like Waze for the buses and trains. It might be hard to log a delay between stations without a connection to the internet. (Streetsblog)

Photos: Inside Borough Park’s Torah Animal World, which is full of taxidermied animals mentioned in the Torah. (Untapped Cities)

Don’t be distracted, the classics are still the only real way to enjoy a meal at Katz’s Deli. (Eater)

The Department of Buildings blames construction materials stored on the roof for the building collapse on Tuesday in the Bronx, calling it a “preventable tragedy.” (Gothamist)

Here’s what eliminating the city’s schools’ gifted programs would look like and what would take their place. (Chalk Beat)

The 21 most anticipated restaurant openings of the fall. (Time Out)

The United States could lose its measles elimination status by October if more cases of the disease are discovered in NYC or NY state. (Huff Post)

Greta Thunberg, the teenage climate activist, arrived via a solar-powered boat on Wednesday after a 15-day trip across the Atlantic to attend the United Nations Climate Action Summit. (NY Times)

It’s rare, but every now and then you come across a subway busker actually worth listening to, like these two guys nailing Prince’s “Kiss.” (Gothamist)

How “public” is New York City’s public transportation? If it doesn’t serve all, who is it meant to serve? (The Indypendent)

No one wants to hear it (except the Halloween-obsessed spooks), but summer is coming to an end. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

How to spend a day eating, drinking, and enjoying Snug Harbor in Staten Island. (NY Times)

The police union passed a vote of no confidence Wednesday in Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner James O’Neill, calling for O’Neill to resign and for Governor Cuomo to remove Mayor de Blasio from office. This is in protest over the firing of Daniel Pantaleo, whose illegal chokehold on Eric Garner lead to his death. (Politico)

The history of the West Indian-American Day Carnival. (6sqft)

The NYPD announced safety measures for the West Indian Day Parade, summarizing their approach with “There will literally be a cop everywhere.” (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

What happened to the city’s safe injection sites? The mayor announced them in May of 2018, but none have opened. Activists that gathered outside Cuomo’s Manhattan offices are blaming the governor for intentionally delaying the state’s mandated review of the program. (Gothamist)

Did you talk shit about Amazon after they announced their Long Island City HQ2 plans? If you did, you’re probably in a secret “NY Negative Statements” dossier the company kept. (Gothamist)

The Notorious B.I.G., but in Funko Pop form. (Brooklyn Vegan)

What the Dodgers meant to Brooklyn. (Brooklyn this Week)

The New York Fire Department forced a Muslim firefighter to shave his beard in violation of his religious beliefs, according to a new lawsuit. (Patch)

15 trendy restaurants you can get into. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for August 14, 2019 – The “Hangry Squirrels Want Your Blood” Edition

Corey Johnson’s Rat Academy, the city and state challenge the “public charge” rule, Inwood fights rezoning, the best pastrami and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Are you ready for Rat Academy? City Council Speaker Corey Johnson is hosting an event with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on August 22 for free training on safe and effective methods for rat prevention. (Facebook)

In the first year of the city’s Culture Pass program, 70,000 tickets to 50 cultural institutions across the city like the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Second Stage, and others were given out. Anyone with a library card is eligible for CulturePass. (amNY)

Google Maps will now show the location of Lime bikes in the city. (Curbed)

The squirrels in Battery Park are out for blood. Don’t let them woo you into a false sense of security with their fluffy tails and seeming meekness. According to a new warning from city officials, they’re vicious little hellbeasts who will go for your food at any cost. (Gothamist)

The city’s subway stations are in pretty poor shape, but they’re the worst in Queens, where 44% of the structural components are in disrepair. The good news in this is that the overall number od station with serious structural deficiencies actually fell from 2012 to 2017. (LIC Post)

The governor signed a new law into place strengthening the state’s sexual harassment protections. (Gothamist)

David Chang continues his “I built my businesses on the foundation of Stephen Ross’s money” apology tour, donating all of the profits his restaurants to different progressive organizations. (Eater)

An oral (and visual!) history of Winston the Wonder Dog that jumped off a roof, fell through a sunroof and seems to be doing okay. (Gothamist)

Broadway producer Ben Sprecher was arrested on Tuesday morning on child pornography charges. (Gothamist)

What does “parents buying” mean on a real estate listing? Pretty much what you might imagine it would. (StreetEasy)

An NYPD officer committed suicide on Tuesday morning, the eighth of the year. An average year sees five officers commit suicide. (NY Times)

The Off-Broadway “How I Learned to Drive” won a Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1998 and 23 years later the show will reunite on Broadway in 2020 with David Morse and Mary-Louise Parker reprising their original roles. (NY Times)

Snapple is spending the summer paying tribute to “Boroughs & Burbs,” and the label designs are about as embarrassing as a drink designed by Bret Michaels. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The warden at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan has been temporarily reassigned after the suicide of Jeffrey Epstein and the two guards guarding him have been put on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation into his death. (NY Times)

The Metropolitan Correctional Center historically has had issues with overcrowding, understaffing, cleanliness, and medical care. This is the same facility that experienced a multi-day heat and electricity outage during the coldest days of last winter. (Gothamist)

The new transit fare OMNY system hit its millionth fare on August 8, four times faster than planned. The MTA has no plans to roll out the system ahead of schedule and will be in all stations and buses by the end of 2020. (amNY)

The 1, 2, and 3 trains are headed for some big outages over the next two weekends as the MTA is wrapping up a rehab project. Service will be shut down between Harlem and Downtown Brooklyn. (amNY)

Today is the first day of the special “look-back” period for sexual abuse lawsuits in the state and thousands of cases are expected to be filed. The suits are being triggered by the Child Victims Act, which increased the statute of limitation for child sexual abuse from age 23 to age 55 and included this one-year “look-back” period. (amNY)

This weekend Apartment 5A: A Tribute to the Show About Nothing takes over Parasol Projects on the Bowery. It’s an exhibition dedicated to all things Seinfeld in celebration of the show’s 30th anniversary. (Gothamist)

Meet Jamaal Bowman, Cornerstone Academy for Social Action’s principal, who is challenging Congressperson Eliot Engel for the 16th Congressional District seat in the House of Representatives. Bowman has the backing of Justice Democrats, the group who pushed Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez into office. (Gothamist)

The city and state are once again planning to take the federal government to court. This time it’s over the final “public charge” rule, which would require immigrants seeking green cards or visas to show they are not likely to rely on certain government programs like food stamps. Without challenge, the rule would go into effect in October. (Patch)

There is only one legal hostel in New York City thanks to the city’s building codes. Council members Mark Gjonaj and Margaret Chin are looking to change that with a new bill that will give hostels their own classification and a regulatory agency to look over them. (Gothamist)

Video: What’s the best pastrami sandwich in the city? (Viewing NYC)

Five finalists in the Big Ideas for Small Lots architecture competition are being displayed at the Center for Architecture. The competition highlights the challenges facing a number of the city’s 10,000 small and/or oddly-shaped lots and faces those challenges with unconventional developments. (Curbed)

A look back at the efforts of Jackie O and preservationists to save Grand Central Terminal from the same fate as the original Penn Station. (6sqft)

Opening arguments were heard on Tuesday in a lawsuit meant to prevent the rezoning of Inwood. The lawsuit accuses the city of failing to look at the environmental impact of the rezoning, particularly among racial lines. The rezoning was approved after three years of community protest that the rezoning continues Mayor de Blasio’s selling out the city to developers. (Gothamist)

A 3.2-acre farm is opening in Brooklyn on the rooftop of the Liberty View Industrial Plaza mall in Sunset Par and operated by Brooklyn Grange. Once the space officially opens, it will be open to the public on Sundays through October. (The Brooklyn Home Reporter)

The opening of a sanitation garage may not seem like a big deal, but it is when a neighborhood’s been waiting for it since 1985. Having a local garage means trash pickup times can change from evenings to mornings, which means a change in how the neighborhood looks and smells. (Kings County Politics)

The classic steakhouses of New York City. (Eater)