The Briefly for October 24, 2019 – The “De Blasio Goes to War With the Lower East Side” Edition

The city is retiming traffic lights for cyclists, the special ingredients in the city’s water, it’s worth freaking out about Wegmans, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Want to live somewhere affordable, but still be in the city? Check out these 15 Queens streets, which are some of the most affordable in the city. (QNS.com)

The Union Square tech hub has a new name. Is Zero Irving any better of a name? (Curbed)

With the highest body count of cyclists killed by drivers in the city in twenty years, the city has begun to reconfigure the timing of traffic lights to better cater to cyclists to make the streets safer. (NY Times)

The mayor’s latest war is against the Lower East Side, with a new “quality of life” campaign for a six-block area that encompasses more than 80 bars and restaurants. They’re using a name that rolls right off the tongue: The Late-Night Quality of Life Improvement Plan. (Curbed)

10 hidden gems in Crown Heights. (Untapped New York)

A chill in the air means it’s the first hints of cuffing season. Here are 10 date ideas you can do on a Citi Bike. (Bushwick Daily)

The ice skating rinks in Central Park have dropped their Trump branding, but make no mistakes, they’ll still be operated by the Trump Organization. Turns out having Trump’s name on things doesn’t help business in New York City. (Curbed)

I don’t think that a Wegmans opening in Brooklyn is a big deal, but my wife who grew up upstate insists that I am very wrong and it’s worth freaking out about Wegmans. (Eater)

The troubled Squibb Bridge that connected Brooklyn Heights to Brooklyn Bridge Park has been demolished after opening in 2013, closing in 2014 and not opening again until 2017 and then closed again in 2018. (Curbed)

A guide on where to eat, drink, shop, and more in Industry City. (StreetEasy)

To combat the high number of NYPD suicides this year, the department is offering free, confidential mental health care as part of the “Finest Care” program. (Patch)

What’s in the city’s water that makes it taste so great? It might be the 270 cancer, brain damage, and pregnancy complicating chemicals found in a recent study by the Environmental World Group. (Patch)

Where to go when you’ve got a blind date. (The Infatuation)

The Briefly for October 9, 2019 – The “I Hope Someone Burns It Down” Edition

Alec Baldwin was scammed and the mayor is taking action, $10 million of speeding tickets in Queens, Brooklyn’s best fried chicken sandwiches, and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

The pre-Yom Kippur Jewish tradition of “transferring” your sins to a live chicken by swinging it over your head is called kaporos. It’s a barbaric and disgusting tradition that kills thousands of chickens in the streets of Crown Heights. You’ll find people saying if you oppose the tradition you’re anti-Semitic or you’re doing the same thing to the Jewish community that Russia or Germany did by callnig for an end to the tradition. Public streets are not the place for slaughtering animals in 2019. (Gothamist)

The 2019 Miss Subways has been crowned. Congratulations are in order to Ms. Dylan Greenberg, this year’s Miss Subways. (NY Times)

One of this year’s election questions is about ranked-choice voting, here’s an explainer on what it is and a little bit on why it’s a good thing. (amNY)

A community hearing about a homeless shelter in Glendale, Queens started with a moment of silence for the homeless men murdered in Chinatown and then quickly devolved into comments like “I hope someone burns it down,” and “They should be locked away forever.” (Gothamist)

Today’s the day for all working New Yorkers have to have completed sexual harassment training at work. The law was passing in April and gave all New York state employers about six months to have it done. The state senate hasn’t had their training yet. (Politico)

The city revitalized 54-acres of wetlands on Staten Island, with the goal for the first phase being 69 acres. Nice. (Curbed)

Video: A look at the history of tattoos in NYC, which were illegal for nearly 40 years. (Viewing NYC)

The most expensive apartment in the Bronx is on sale for $4.6 Million. (Welcome2TheBronx)

NYC has seen its first vaping death. (Patch)

It’s not only mind-boggling that there are 32 pairs of bus stops less than 260 feet away from each other, but it slows down the routes to have stops that close. (6sqft)

Drivers in Queens racked up over $10 million in speed camera violations in six weeks of the program giving $50 tickets for going more than 10 miles an hour over the speed limit in a school zone. Queens accounts for more than 1/3 of the $28 million total. (LIC Post)

Skunks are common in the city, but for the first time, one has been spotted in Prospect Park. They’re harmless as long as you don’t threaten them, so welcome to our new fuzzy and sometimes stinky park-dwellers. (Patch)

Take a ride in the new Cash Cab. (amNY)

The company operating floating billboards has finally left the city, after the city and state both passed laws making their type of floating billboards illegal. (Patch)

In the dumbest series of events that lead to something good, Alec Baldwin was scammed by the guys selling tickets to boat tours of the Statue of Liberty around Battery Park and Tuesday the mayor said the city will crack down on this type of ticketing scam. If you want to go to the statue, tickets are sold in front of Castle Clinton and on the Statue Cruises website. (NY Times)

What kind of punishment would you assume killing a 10-year-old with a car while driving without a license carries? If you said “a misdemeanor with a maximum punishment of 30 days in jail,” you’re right. (Streetsblog)

Netflix is turning Broadway’s Belasco Theatre into a movie theater to show Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman for the month of November. (Time Out)

A review of Mario Batali’s biggest NYC restaurants in a post-Batali world. (Eater)

The 10 best fried chicken sandwiches in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

The Briefly for August 26, 2019 – The “This Comes With A $10k Toilet” Edition

The US Open owes $300,000 in rent, Corey johnson writes for food access, New York’s red flag gun law goes into place, new restaurant openings and more in today’s daily NYC news digest

Monday means another week of late-night subway changes and disruptions. (Subway Weekender)

Queens Public Library’s Hunters Point branch is opening on September 24, after 4 years of construction. (Curbed)

All the big tech companies in the city, mapped. (The Real Deal)

Would you expect anything less than a $10,000 toilet in a $29 million home? (Architectural Digest)

The U.S. Open generates more than $750 million per year in “direct economic impact” to New York City and employs over 7,000 people each, but it also owes the city $300,000 in rent. (amNY)

Welcome to the weirdest office in the city. (Untapped Cities)

New York’s “red flag” gun bill went into effect over the weekend, which allows removal of their guns if a family member, law enforcement officer or educator successfully petitions the court. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Pacific Park, which was previously named Atlantic Yards, is the epicenter of the latest city vs state battle. The state gave approval for a massive underground gym to be added to the development and local officials are outraged that no concessions were made, especially since the developers are already behind in their commitment to creating affordable housing. (Brooklyn Paper)

Via for Schools will give parents and students the ability to track their bus’ locations in realtime. Last year thousands of kids experiencing multi-hour bus rides home from school. (Gothamist)

A federal appeals court upheld a rule that bans for-hire vehicles like Uber and Lyfts from having ads inside and on top of the vehicle.

New York’s license plates are changing, but the way they’re made will not be. License plates are made by prisoners earning $0.65/hour at the Auburn Correctional Facility. (Gothamist)

There have been no new measles cases reported in August and with the number stopped at 654, this may signal the end fo the measles outbreak that started in September 2018. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle)

Department of Corrections at Rikers Island cannot legally put an 18 – 21-year-old in solitary confinement, but that doesn’t mean they haven’t found a new form of extreme isolation, this one without any restrictions. (Gothamist)

The Spotted Pig has been in trouble since owner Ken Friedman was accused of groping his female staffers and other sexual misconduct. Foot traffic is down because a declining number of people want to support a business owned by that kind of monster. Now, with foot traffic and revenue down, Ken Friedman sees the writing on the wall and is open to selling. (Eater)

Here are the buildings in the city with the most elevator complaints. (Curbed)

She’s been making breakfast on the city’s streets for over 35 years. Meet the woman behind Mama Jo’s Breakfast Cart and self-proclaimed oldest street vendor in New York City, Mama Jo. (Viewing NYC)

You may not be invited over to Meryl Streep’s townhouse, but you can see what it looks like on the inside through this $18.25 million real estate listing. (Curbed)

It’s late August and someone on the corner of First Ave and third Street just put their Christmas tree on the curb. Amazing. (EV Grieve)

Photos from the Official Animal Rights March. (EV Grieve)

6 ways to celebrate National Dog Day in New York City. (amNY)

Be careful with your children and dogs in Central Park, Prospect Park, and Morningside Park. Deadly, toxic algae blooms have been found in all three parks. The Prospect Park Dog Beach is still safe. These blooms are likely side-effects of the recent, intense rains which have been linked to climate change. (NY Times)

A look back at Mayor David Dinkins, 30 years after his historic 1989 election to become the first black mayor of New York City. (Gotham Gazette)

Corey Johnson’s latest op-ed argues that access to adequate, nutritious food is a human right. (Chelsea Now)

7 new restaurant openings. (The Infatuation)

Thanks to Leah Bassity for today’s featured image.